OJD Week In Review: Nov. 6-10

This week we’ve got a few new resources and updates for you, just in case you haven’t already got them in your own inbox.

In the Week Behind Us

Last week the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice released a report titled “Developmental Reform in Juvenile Justice: Translating the Science of Adolescent Development to Sustainable Best Practice“.  This report is designed to assist local- and state-level organizations with incorporating “adolescent development research into their efforts to maximize improved and sustainable youth outcomes and system performance.”

Wake U

Also last week, NCCRED in collaboration with the Wake Forest University School of Law and Justice Program, the Wake Forest Journal of Law and Policy and the Wake Forest University Rethinking Community series held its Community Policing Symposium on Nov. 3.  The event featured a virtual lecture, a video presentation, and several discussions on how to improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve.  The summary for the event can be read here.

 

Lots of NJJN News

First in National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) news, we wanted to notify everyone that NJJN has  released a call to action to combat racism.  In their statement, NJJN acknowledges efforts in America’s history for civil rights and addresses the shortcomings of the juvenile justice system, particularly for youth of color, but also pointing out the marginalization of LGBTQI youth, children with disabilities and others.  NJJN also asks juvenile justice advocates to evaluate how we have approached racial injustice, to identify leadership, and  ask how we are held accountable.  Please take a moment to read the full article, which can be found here.

Secondly, NJJN has launched a campaign offering recommendations to improve relationships between police and youth of color.  They have a page on their website with a downloadable PDF with data and suggestions for distribution, and a press release template to help groups and individual advocates spread the word and get others involved.

Finally, NJJN has also announced that the Youth Justice Project will be hosting the #NJJNForum2018 in Durham.  This forum will celebrate the passage of Raise the Age in North Carolina and address much-needed reforms, such as eliminating collateral consequences, remedying racial and gender disparities, better access to defense for youth, and stemming the tide of referrals from schools to courts.  Currently, the organizations are seeking volunteers to join the Forum Planning Committee.  Please email Alyson Clements for more details.

Police Platform

More Useful Info

Earlier this week, the North Carolina Bar Association published an article by Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry about the National Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit.  In his writing, Zogry gives a brief account of his experience during the 21st annual conference.  You can read his article here and check out the NJDC page for more info on the Summit.

The Pew Charitable Trusts has created a chart, offering a visual display of data released from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  The data shows the declining rates of adjudicated youth  from 2006-2015, by state.  You can see the chart here.

From the On the Civil Side blog, Professor LaToya Powell’s has a new entry, “The Juvenile Court Counselor’s Role As Gatekeeper.”  You can read Professor Powell’s latest post here.

…and a Final Reminder

We also want to offer one final reminder that the Center for Death Penalty Litigation will be closing applications for its new staff attorney position on Monday, November 13.  You can view the full details about this position and how to apply here.

That is all for now.  We hope everyone has a safe and relaxing Veteran’s Day and there is more to come soon, so be sure to check back with us!

OJD Week in Review: Oct. 2-6

This week we want to remind everyone of some upcoming events/deadlines, an update to a Court of Appeals decision and an old-but-new addition to our materials for defenders.

LeandroOn Oct. 13, from 9:30 to 1 p.m., the the UNC Center for Civil Rights and the UNC Education Law & Policy Society, Black Law Students Association, and National Lawyers Guild are sponsoring “Leandro at 20: Two Decades in Pursuit of a Sound Basic Education.”  This event commemorates the 20th anniversary of Leandro v. State.  Registration is free, but space is limited, so be sure to sign up now!

Also, a brief reminder to recent law school grads (Class of 2017 or 2018), that applications for the NJDC Gault Fellowship are due by Oct. 30.  You can find further details about this opportunity and how to apply in our previous post from last month.  njdc logo

The Wake Forest University School of Law has just announced that registration is now open for their upcoming symposium.  This event, titled “The New Law and Order: Working Toward Equitable Community-Centered Policing in North Carolina”, will be hosted by the WFU School of Law Criminal Justice Program, NCCRED, and the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy on Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Four hours of CLE credit will be offered for attending.  You can register on their website here, and for further info on the symposium please check here.

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We also need to thank Assistant Appellate Defender David Andrews for reminding us that the Court of Appeals vacated the adjudication in In re T.K. on Sept. 29.  Andrews writes: “The basis of the opinion was that the juvenile petition was defective because the court counselor did not sign the petition and check the box on the petition indicating that it had been approved for filing.

“After the Court of Appeals issued its opinion, the State filed a petition for discretionary review in the Supreme Court of North Carolina.  [Last Friday], the Supreme Court issued an order denying the petition, which means that the Court of Appeals opinion in In re T.K. stands and will remain undisturbed.  So . . . keep scrutinizing petitions to make sure that they are proper!”

We would also like to bring it to everyone’s attention that we have the materials from this year’s Juvenile Defender Conference now available on our website.  Apologies for not having it added sooner, and big thanks to Austine Long for notifying us.  If you need a refresher or if you just happened to miss the conference and would like to see what was covered, the electronic copy of the materials are now ready and waiting for you in the “School of Government” section under the “Materials for Defenders” tab.

Juvenile defenders and others are still encouraged to share if there is anything you wish to discuss on our blog or our new podcast!  We are expecting more updates for other events in the coming months and we will also have other activities to share from our office as well, so be sure to check back frequently!

Save the Date: NCCRED Syposium

The North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NC-CRED), the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy, and the Wake Forest School of Law Criminal Justice Program, present “The New Law and Order: Working Towards Equitable and Community-Centered Policing in North Carolina” on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1312. The event is free and open to the public.  Approval for up to four hours of Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit from the North Carolina Bar Association is pending approval.  The event is also scheduled to be a live webcast.

NC-CRED is a diverse group of criminal justice stakeholders—judges, police chiefs, district attorneys, public defenders, scholars and community advocates, who work collaboratively to identify, document and reduce racial disparities in North Carolina’s criminal justice system.  The symposium will bring together law enforcement, practicing attorneys, scholars and community advocates to discuss equitable reforms to address racial disparities in policing in North Carolina.

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New L&O