OJD Week in Review: Apr. 2-6

We are hoping everyone had a safe and happy Easter weekend and Passover, and we would like to recognize that we are now in Child Abuse Prevention Month (check out the National Criminal Justice Reference Service page for stats and other information).  We  have the usual training and job opportunity reminders for you this week along with a few online events that may arouse your interest.

From Around the Community

njdc logoOn Wednesday, Apr. 11, at 1 p.m. (EST) the Shriver Center Advocacy Exchange will be hosting a live, interactive webcast discussing effective partnerships between civil legal aid attorneys and juvenile defenders.  The online event will explore how partnerships between juvenile defenders and civil legal aid attorneys can minimize the effect of collateral consequences youth face from juvenile court involvement, such as difficulties continuing their education, finding a job, accessing housing, and even joining the military, as highlighted by the National Juvenile Defender Center in an article published on the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law’s Clearinghouse Community.  Interested parties may register here for the webinar.

The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) will be hosting a webinar titled “Pushing Back on Gang Databases and Injunctions” on Tuesday, Apr. 10, from noon to 1 p.m.  This one-hour presentation by  Kim McGill, organizer with the Youth Justice Coalition and NJJN member, will cover her own successful advocacy in California,  which recently passed legislation limiting the use of shared gang databases.  You may register for the webinar here.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Council of State Governments Justice Center will host the 2018 Janet Reno Forum on May 21 at  Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.  The forum will highlight strategies for restructuring juvenile justice systems to more effectively enhance public safety and improve outcomes for youth.  The event will include the presentation of the second annual Janet Reno Endowment Women’s Leadership Award, and attendees will receive a publication featuring the highlighted strategies.  Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders are invited to attend.  Please register here.

Training

TRAINING--DEVELOPMENT

Disability Rights North Carolina will be hosting its 2018 Disability Advocacy Conference on Apr. 19.  The conference offers 5.0 CLE credits for lawyers, which includes 1.0 credit hour for substance abuse/mental health awareness.  Sessions include parental rights, restrictive interventions in public schools, guardianship reforms, and a session exclusively tailored to attorneys titled “Recognizing and Responding to a Lawyer with a Mental Health Disorder”, just to name a few.  To learn more about this event and register please visit their web page here.

Registration is now open for N.C. Bar Association’s annual meeting, this year titled “The Future of Law”.   This event will be hosted at the Wilmington Convention Center from June 21 – 24.  For those who register before May 1, a President’s Luncheon ticket and 6.0 CLE credit hours will be included with the registration price.  Topics covered will include artificial intelligence, virtual reality, design thinking in the law, and the future of legal service delivery.  For further info and to register please check out the NCBA website and the event brochure.

On May 10, the N.C. Bar Association will be hosting “Raise the Age: A New Era for Juvenile Justice in North Carolina” at the N.C. Bar Center in Cary, from 8:25 a.m. to 3 p.m.  This seminar promises to expand attendees’ understanding of the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act and its practical and ethical implications.  Attendees will receive 5.5 CLE credits total, with 1.0 CLE credit in Ethics/Professional Responsibility and 4.5 General CLE credits.  For further details about this event, please check the website here.

RTA

 

Job Opportunities

The National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) is seeking a mid-level policy attorney to handle youth justice issues in Santa Clara County.  Applications will be accepted through Apr. 15.  For further details and to apply please check here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) is still accepting applications for its 2018-19 Youth Justice Leadership Institute.  This is an annual year-long fellowship program that selects 10 people of color working as professionals in the juvenile justice field to participate in a curriculum to develop their leadership and advocacy skills.  The fellowship can be completed with the fellows’ current employment, so those selected will not have to leave their jobs to participate in the Institute.  The fellowship will include two fully financed retreats, mentoring and frequent distance learning opportunities.  Applications for the Institute (found here) must be submitted by Apr. 23.

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is currently hiring a strategic communications manager.  The individual in this position will be responsible for crafting organizational messaging, overseeing editorial excellence, and working with leadership to implement a communications strategy that is creative, forward-thinking, and reflective of NJDC’s vision.  This position will remain opened until filled.  To find further info about the position and how to apply, please go here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

That pretty much covers the news we have this week.  Please spread the word to any of your associates who may still be on vacation this week so that they do not miss out on any of the opportunities we’ve listed here, as many are on short time now before they close.  To all actors in the N.C. juvenile justice system, we appreciate all that you do and we are always here to help.  We’d love to hear from you if you have any questions, comments, or concerns.  We will be sure to share more next week!

OJD Week In Review: Jan. 29-Feb. 2

This week we’ve been promoting some great new resources and opportunities, and continuing our momentum from the past few days, we just want to rehash a few things and introduce some other good nuggets for you all:

NCCRED Wants YOU

NCCREDThe North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) has opened applications for a new executive director.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Applications will be accepted until Feb. 15.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

New Resources

The North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients.  As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  In order to assist counsel in meeting the requirement of Padilla, IDS has contracted with two experienced immigration attorneys who will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.  An Immigration Consequences page has been added to IDS’ website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) has recently launched a Teen Dating Violence feature on its website.  This page offers links to the National Dating Abuse Helpline along with various publications and other resources to help victims and others involved with people who need aid or just want to be educated on the issue.   Their pages also provide further links to information on domestic violence, sexual assault, and “special populations”, including juveniles.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also released an updated review on “Interactions Between Youth and Law Enforcement“.  This document compiles research from various organizations, analyzing youth-initiated and police-initiated interactions, the impacts of such interactions on the juvenile justice system, police training programs, diversion programs and more.  The full review can be found here.

Training Opportunities

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favoriteThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

 

That will be all for this week.   There is plenty more to come in the next few weeks, so check back here early and often.  Also, if there is anything anyone in the N.C. juvenile defense community would like to submit to us to promote on our website and other channels, be sure to contact us and let us know.  We are always here to support you!