OJD Week in Review: Mar. 5-9

This week we’ve got a new update regarding Raise the Age, a valuable resource for defenders and, as usual, we’ve got some new training opportunities and job opportunities for you as well.

New JJAC Report

RTA

The Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) released its first report on Mar. 1, which can now be found on our “Raise the Age” page under the “Information for Defenders” tab.  We’ve added a new section to the “Raise the Age” page dedicated to providing updates from JJAC to allow everyone to follow the Committee’s progress.  This report details the key implementation dates for initiatives proposed in the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act, the Committee’s requests for a unified video conferencing system, recommendations for transfer and housing of juveniles, requests from JJAC, OJD, and the Administrative Office of the Courts for additional funding, staff and other resources, dates for community and stakeholder forums, and other recommendations and plans of JJAC and its subcommittees.  A summary of the JJAC meeting prior to the report can be found here on our site.

Job/Fellowship Opportunities

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is currently hiring a strategic communications manager.  The individual in this position will be responsible for crafting organizational messaging, overseeing editorial excellence, and working with leadership to implement a communications strategy that is creative, forward-thinking, and reflective of NJDC’s vision.  This position will remain opened until filled.  To find further info about the position and how to apply, please go here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) is now accepting applications for its 2018-19 Youth Justice Leadership Institute.  This is an annual year-long fellowship program that selects 10 people of color working as professionals in the juvenile justice field to participate in a curriculum to develop their leadership and advocacy skills.  The fellowship can be completed with the fellows’ current employment, so those selected will not have to leave their jobs to participate in the Institute.  The fellowship will include two fully financed retreats, mentoring and frequent distance learning opportunities.  NJJN has already hosted one informational webinar on Mar. 8 and will host the next on Apr. 2.  To register for one of this webinar, please visit here.  Applications for the Institute (found here) must be submitted by Apr. 23.

 

Training

JD Leadship Summit 2018Save the Date!  NJDC will be hosting the 2018 Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit in St. Paul, Minnesota on Oct. 26-28.  We will be sure to provide further details for this event as they arrive.

Disability Rights North Carolina will be hosting its 2018 Disability Advocacy Conference on Apr. 19.  The conference offers five CLE credits for lawyers, including one credit hour for substance abuse/mental health awareness.  Sessions include parental rights, restrictive interventions in public schools, guardianship reforms, and a session exclusively tailored to attorneys titled “Recognizing and Responding to a Lawyer with a Mental Health Disorder”, just to name a few.  To learn more about this event and register please visit their web page here.

On March 12, 2018, from 4 to 5 p.m. ET, the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators‘ Positive Youth Outcomes Committee will host “Classroom Excellence in Secure Residential Facilities.” This webinar will highlight work to improve the quality of education provided to at-risk, low-income, minority teenagers and young adults who are attending schools in alternative settings, including youth correctional facilities.  You can register for the webinar here.

New Resources

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has released the Juvenile Residential Facility Census Databook, the latest addition to the Data Analysis Tools section of its Statistical Briefing Book. National and state data from 2000 to 2014 describing the characteristics of residential placement facilities that hold juvenile offenders are now available for analysis. This includes operation, classification, size, and crowding.

Events Around the Community

The North Carolina Bar Association Juvenile Justice and Children’s Rights Section will be holding a council meeting on March 22, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.  A networking reception will be held directly after the meeting at Whiskey Kitchen on 201 W. Martin St. and appetizers and a cash bar will be provided.  All section members and attorneys who could be members are welcome to attend and may RSVP here.

And that sums it up for this week.  We will have some more updates to our social media channels and more news you can use in the coming weeks, so please check back with us often.  Invitations are still open for guest bloggers and podcast guests as well, so feel free to reach out.  Until next week, we wish you well!

OJD Week In Review: Jan. 29-Feb. 2

This week we’ve been promoting some great new resources and opportunities, and continuing our momentum from the past few days, we just want to rehash a few things and introduce some other good nuggets for you all:

NCCRED Wants YOU

NCCREDThe North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) has opened applications for a new executive director.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Applications will be accepted until Feb. 15.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

New Resources

The North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients.  As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  In order to assist counsel in meeting the requirement of Padilla, IDS has contracted with two experienced immigration attorneys who will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.  An Immigration Consequences page has been added to IDS’ website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) has recently launched a Teen Dating Violence feature on its website.  This page offers links to the National Dating Abuse Helpline along with various publications and other resources to help victims and others involved with people who need aid or just want to be educated on the issue.   Their pages also provide further links to information on domestic violence, sexual assault, and “special populations”, including juveniles.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also released an updated review on “Interactions Between Youth and Law Enforcement“.  This document compiles research from various organizations, analyzing youth-initiated and police-initiated interactions, the impacts of such interactions on the juvenile justice system, police training programs, diversion programs and more.  The full review can be found here.

Training Opportunities

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favoriteThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

 

That will be all for this week.   There is plenty more to come in the next few weeks, so check back here early and often.  Also, if there is anything anyone in the N.C. juvenile defense community would like to submit to us to promote on our website and other channels, be sure to contact us and let us know.  We are always here to support you!

OJD Week In Review: Oct. 30 – Nov. 3

We hope everyone had a great Halloween, and this week we’ve got a few new updates to resources, training info, and reminders for you.

A Few Treats and (Possibly New) Tricks You Can Use

Never too old

The Youth Justice Project has released a new report titled “Putting Justice in North Carolina’s Juvenile System”.  This report points out areas in which North Carolina’s juvenile justice system is failing youth, especially youth of color.  The  report identifies five major barriers that are hindering the N.C. juvenile justice system, including one which sites inadequate resources for OJD.  You can read the report here.

The W. Haywood Burns Institute has updated its interactive map which illustrates significant racial and ethnic disparities in youth incarceration rates.  Through this map you can review how your state ranks in incarceration rates, compare which counties have incarcerated the most youth by race,  and filter data by measurement, race, offense and placement type.  You can view the map on their website here.

Registration is now open for the Winter Criminal Law Webinar: Case and Legislative Update.  This webinar is open to public defenders and private attorneys who are interested in or currently practicing indigent defense work and will cover recent criminal law decisions from the N.C. Appellate Court and N.C. Supreme Court.  The training will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 8, and will reward participants with 1.5 hours of general CLE credit.  There is a registration fee of $75 for privately assigned counsel, contract attorneys and other non-IDS employees.  Registration ends on Dec. 6 at 5 p.m.  To register and find more info on presenters and topics included in this event, please visit the School of Government’s page.

Whale TrT

Stretched and Fading Deadlines

The Center for Death Penalty Litigation in Durham has extended its deadline for applications for a new staff attorney.  The closing date for this position will now be November 13.  You can view the full details about this position and how to apply here.

Applications for the North Carolina Judicial Fellowship’s two-year fellowships (six openings) beginning in August 2018 will close today at 5 p.m.  If you want to get in a last-minute application, feel free to check their website and submit it fast!

And that is all for this week.  There will be more to come in the next few weeks, even in the holiday season, so continue to check back frequently.  Also, feel free to join the conversation on our social media pages and feel free to share, especially on the OJD Facebook page, if there is something you think is worth discussing in the juvenile defender community!

OJD Week in Review: Oct. 16-20

This week we’ve got a few new resources for you, a panel discussion, and a declaration from the governor’s office we had to include.

Quick Reminder

Firstly, we’d like to remind everyone of the approaching deadlines for a couple of job opportunities we’ve previously mentioned.  Applications for the NJDC Gault Fellowship are due Monday, Oct. 30.  Also, applications for North Carolina Judicial Fellowship‘s two associate counsel positions are due by 5 p.m. today, and applications for the six (6) two-year fellowships starting August 2018 will close on Nov. 3.  Hurry and spread the word or apply if you are interested!

The National Juvenile Justice Network has also posted an opening for a 2018 Fall internship.  The full details for this unpaid internship can be found here.

And moving on to this week’s news…

On last Friday, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper declared Oct. 15-21 “Juvenile Justice Week” (among other things).  In his proclamation (which can be read here), Governor Cooper acknowledges the milestones achieved by the Juvenile Justice Section of the Division of Adult Corrections and Juvenile Justice, including the decline of the juvenile crime rate and passing of Raise the Age.

AtlanticOn Tuesday, Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry joined Ricky Watson, Jr., co-director of the Youth Justice Project, and District Court Judge Louis Trosch, Jr., co-chair of Race Matters of Juvenile Justice and judge for the 26th judicial circuit, on a live panel with The Atlantic‘s Assistant Editor (now to promoted Managing Editor as of this post) Adrienne Green to discuss juvenile justice reform and racial disparities.  In the video, the panel touches on school-justice partnerships, acknowledging implicit biases, and expectations for Raise the Age.  You can view the video here.

From the On the Civil Side blog, Professor LaToya Powell offers some insights on capacity.  In the latest post, titled “Incapacity to Proceed and Juveniles“, Powell breaks down the requirements for a juvenile to be determined capable of proceeding.

The Sentencing Project has also released two new fact sheets, “Native Disparities in Youth Incarceration” and “Latino Disparities in Youth Incarceration“, which offer quick statistics on the disparities between juvenile placements of youth of these ethnic groups and their Caucasian peers.  These fact sheets can be paired with the “Black Disparities in Youth Incarceration” fact sheet released back in September.

NJJN image

You should also check out the National Juvenile Justice Network’s latest newsletter when you find the time.  NJJN has several new articles, including one discussing Texas’ plans for juvenile justice reform, ways to participate in Youth Justice Action Month, and recognizing implicit bias, just to name a few.  The toolkit for changing harmful media narratives about youth of color that we mentioned last week can also be found in their newsletter.

That is all for this week, folks.  We hope that it has been a great Juvenile Justice Week for everyone.  If there is anything you would like to share about your experience during Youth Justice Action Month, please let the N.C. Juvenile Defender community know on Facebook or here on our blog!

OJD Week in Review: Oct. 9-13

This week we would like to point out some new resources, upcoming deadlines, and available job opportunities.

Fellowships and Deadlines

Early this week, the North Carolina Judicial Fellowship, a new office within the N.C. Judicial Branch which provides legal support to district and superior court judges, opened applications for several positions.  Currently, the office is accepting  applications for two associate counsel positions and six fellowships for August 2018 to August 2020.  Applications for these positions will close next Friday, Oct. 20, and Nov. 3, respectively.  On Nov. 6, the office will begin accepting applications for two other fellowships serving from January 2018 to August 2019.  The deadline for applications to this fellowship will be Nov. 17.  For more information about any of the positions or to apply, please visit here.  Questions may be directed to Andrew Brown, Director of the N.C. Judicial Fellowship at 919-890-1671 or Andrew.Brown@nccourts.org.

The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law has also opened applications for a two-year clinical fellowship beginning on Jan. 8, 2018.  This will be an immigration law fellowship in the Bluhm Legal Clinic’s Children and Family Justice Center.  The fellow will participate in community outreach, represent youth and parents in immigration court proceedings, and assist in the supervision and teaching of clinical students.  The deadline for applications will be Nov. 15 and all application materials and questions can be submitted to Uzoamaka Emeka Nzelibe.  The full description and requirements for this position can be found here.

New Resources, Fresh Updates, and Media

The National Juvenile Justice Network released a new toolkit on Tuesday which offers suggestions for advocates of juvenile justice to change the narrative of how minority youth are portrayed in the media.  The toolkit discusses social media strategies, methods for establishing relationships with media outlets, and other resources to assist in the prevention of media that criminalizes youth of color.

Campaign for Youth Justice released its newest report this week titled Raising the Bar:  State Trends in Keeping Youth Out of Adult Courts (2015-2017),  which examines states that are creating solutions to prevent children from entering the adult criminal justice system.  The report suggests that since 2005, 36 states have implemented a significant number of laws to protect youth from being treated as adults, even referencing plans to raise the age in multiple states, including North Carolina.  The report highlights the strengths and weaknesses of reform efforts in specific states as well.

CFYJ State Trends

We would also like to bring attention to several videos on Suite 6 LLC’s Vimeo channel, produced in collaboration with Campaign for Youth Justice.  These videos showcase interviews with adults who were incarcerated as juveniles and the parents of children involved in the justice system.   The interviews offer a intriguing perspective of individuals affected by the juvenile justice system.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has recently updated its Statistical Briefing Book to include a Data Snapshot series.  The one-page data sheets reveal stats on subjects such as characteristics/trends in delinquency cases involving Hispanic youth, the continued decline of the juvenile placement population, and frequently asked questions about commitments based on race and ethnicity.  There are also updates to several older resources.  The list for all of the new info can be accessed here.

do-dont-sign-300x296The Council of State Governments also has a great resource that was released last month titled “Do’s and Don’ts For Reducing Recidivism Among Young Adults in the Justice System“.  The document is a concrete and concise list outlining the best strategies for policymakers and leaders in juvenile justice to improve the outcomes for youth involved in the justice system.

And that is all there is for this week!  Juvenile justice advocates are always welcome to lend their voices to our blog or podcast, and don’t be shy about leaving comments and questions for us on our social media pages as well.  We want to have conversations with you all!  We will continue to provide more updates to the news above and other events as they arise, so please be sure to check out our website, Facebook, and Twitter frequently.  And as always, thanks for all that you do!

A Brief Word on the Harms of Juvenile Detention and Juvenile Probation Order Reform

Image result for juvenile detention center nc

What’s the harm in putting a child in a detention center?  While it might be argued that juvenile detention is in the best interest of the child prior to trial, statistical data proves otherwise.  The detrimental affects on youth and their families for even brief periods of containment in juvenile detention are detailed here.

Probation orders are also a common problem, and probation just happens to be the most common disposition given to juveniles adjudicated delinquent.  The rules of probation are difficult to understand and follow for most juveniles, and if not tailored appropriately to the child, the rules can be easily violated and lead to long-term repercussions on them.  In order for probation to yield the intended positive effects for youth, change is greatly needed.  You can learn more here.

Both articles above were recently published by the National Juvenile Defender Center.