OJD Week in Review: Nov. 26 – 30

Salutations and happy Friday to all!  This week we’ve got a decent haul of fresh updates and reminders for upcoming deadlines.  Of course, in the holiday season things will eventually slow down again, but we’ve got other content planned before the end of the year for you…

Job Opportunities

The Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is currently seeking a full-time Project Attorney for a two-year contract position with the Office of the Juvenile Defender (OJD).  This is a federal grant-funded position meant to improve the training capabilities of OJD and prepare juvenile defense attorneys for the changes that will result from the Raise the Age legislation.  The Project Attorney’s duties will include planning and oversight of juvenile defense training statewide and recruitment of local trainers.  The selected candidate will report to the Juvenile Defender and IDS Contract Administrator.  The ideal candidate will have a minimum of three years of juvenile defense or appellate court experience, will be able to travel statewide, and possess experience in educating/training of professionals.  Applications will be accepted until Monday, Dec. 3, 2018.  For more information about the position, please check the post here.

IGotTheJob

The Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS), the Massachusetts public defender agency, is currently seeking a director for its newly created Strategic Litigation Unit.  The Strategic Litigation Unit will be responsible for litigation aimed at achieving systemic and institutional reform in all of CPCS’s criminal and civil practice areas.  The Strategic Litigation Director will lead those efforts and will work with other attorneys, advocacy organizations, and clients to promote justice for and protect the rights of individuals who are parties in criminal and civil right-to-counsel proceedings.  The director’s responsibilities will include criminal and civil litigation and administrative advocacy.  Litigation will include both trial and appellate advocacy in state and federal court.  Depending upon the matter at issue, the director may serve as lead counsel, co-counsel, consultant, amicus curiae, or provide technical support.  The position will be posted until filled.  To find further information and to apply, please visit here.

Bay Area Legal Aid is currently seeking a Youth Justice Staff Attorney who will provide civil legal services designed to meet the individualized needs of delinquency-involved youth, with a particular focus on SSI cases for children with disabilities.  This position is based out of Alameda County, CA, but the position may include travel throughout the Bay Area.  The Youth Justice Attorney’s responsibilities include client interviews, negotiations with governmental agencies/opposing parties, research and writing, and representation at administrative and court proceedings.  The attorney is also expected to engage in outreach with probation, social services, law enforcement, youth service providers, and other community organizations.  Beyond SSI cases, the position may also include a smaller, mixed caseload in areas such as special education, health access, public benefits (e.g. foster care benefits, CalWORKs, and General Assistance), legal permanency, housing, and other work.  Clients served by this project experience high rates of sexual exploitation, abuse and neglect, and mental health-related issues which the attorney will be expected to navigated in providing legal assistance.  Review of applications will begin immediately and continue on a rolling basis, but applicants are encouraged to apply as soon as possible.  For a full description of the job responsibilities and the application process, please check here.

From Around the Community

From the On the Civil Side blog, Professor Jacquelyn Greene discusses delinquency dispositional orders.  In this blog, Greene breaks down what factors need to be considered when deciding dispositional orders for juveniles.  You can read the full blog post here.

From the creators of the weekly public radio program This American Life, a spinoff podcast called Serial has an episode focused on youth at an Ohio juvenile correctional facility.  You can listen to the podcast here.  (Shout-out to David Andrews for bringing this piece to our attention!)

Training

i-love-training-trainings-my-favorite

From March 25- 29, 2019, at the Georgetown University Hotel and Conference Center the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) will be hosting the Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Juvenile Justice Certificate Program.  This is an intensive training  hosted in partnership with the Center for Children’s Law and Policy (CCLP) and designed to support local jurisdictions in their efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in their juvenile justice systems.   The training will allow participants to develop and implement a Capstone Project designed to reduce the disparate treatment in their communities.  CJJR will only accept a limited number of applicants, so please visit the website to view the curriculum and learn how to apply to the training.  Applications will be accepted through December 14, 2018.  For more information, please visit the training website.

On Dec. 7, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., the UNC School of Government will be hosting the 2018 Winter Criminal Law Update webinar.  This webinar will cover recent criminal law decisions issued by the North Carolina appellate courts and U.S. Supreme Court and will highlight significant criminal law legislation enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly.  School of Government criminal law experts Shea Denning and Phil Dixon Jr. will discuss a wide range of issues affecting felony and misdemeanor cases in the North Carolina state courts.  Participants will receive 1.5 hours of general CLE credit and this qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit.  All public defenders, private attorneys who handle or are interested in pursuing indigent criminal defense work, and other court personnel who handle criminal cases are invited.  The registration fee for private assigned counsel, contract attorneys, and other non-IDS employees is $75.00.  There is no registration fee for IDS state employees.   Please visit here to register online and find additional information about the webinar.  Pre-registration is required; the deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 5.  As it is a live broadcast, the webinar is NOT subject to the State Bar’s 6-hour per year credit limit for computer-based CLE.  For more info, please contact Program Manager Tanya Jisa or call 919.843.8981.

That will be all for now.  If you have any articles, videos, or podcasts from around the community or even something personal related to juvenile justice that you would like to submit, please feel free to reach out!  We’re always happy to see more engagement and have more collaboration!  Until next time, enjoy the weekend!

 

OJD Week In Review: Jan. 29-Feb. 2

This week we’ve been promoting some great new resources and opportunities, and continuing our momentum from the past few days, we just want to rehash a few things and introduce some other good nuggets for you all:

NCCRED Wants YOU

NCCREDThe North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) has opened applications for a new executive director.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Applications will be accepted until Feb. 15.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

New Resources

The North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients.  As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  In order to assist counsel in meeting the requirement of Padilla, IDS has contracted with two experienced immigration attorneys who will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.  An Immigration Consequences page has been added to IDS’ website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) has recently launched a Teen Dating Violence feature on its website.  This page offers links to the National Dating Abuse Helpline along with various publications and other resources to help victims and others involved with people who need aid or just want to be educated on the issue.   Their pages also provide further links to information on domestic violence, sexual assault, and “special populations”, including juveniles.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also released an updated review on “Interactions Between Youth and Law Enforcement“.  This document compiles research from various organizations, analyzing youth-initiated and police-initiated interactions, the impacts of such interactions on the juvenile justice system, police training programs, diversion programs and more.  The full review can be found here.

Training Opportunities

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favoriteThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

 

That will be all for this week.   There is plenty more to come in the next few weeks, so check back here early and often.  Also, if there is anything anyone in the N.C. juvenile defense community would like to submit to us to promote on our website and other channels, be sure to contact us and let us know.  We are always here to support you!