OJD Week in Review: Jan. 29 – Feb. 1

Happy first Friday and welcome to February!  Of course, this week there is a new tip, but we’ve also got another JJAC report, a new resource, and some new training announcements to share.

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Tip of the Week – When Should I Receive the Disposition Report?

You should try to receive the disposition report prior to the dispositional hearing to review with your client.  If possible, try to get a copy of the report at least several days prior to the hearing.  While there is no statutory authority compelling the receipt from the intake counselor, there are local rules which suggest time periods.

JJAC Updates

The Juvenile Jurisdiction Advisory Committee (JJAC) has released its 2017 Annual Report.  This report features accomplishments of JJAC, data on the JCPC services, juvenile court services, juvenile facility populations,  education and clinical services, and more.  You can read the full report here.

Training

On March 15, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., the UNC School of Government (SOG) will be hosting the first North Carolina Criminal Justice Summit in the the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Club.  The Summit will be lead by SOG’s own Professor of Public Law and Government Jessica Smith and will feature national and state experts with broad-ranging ideological perspectives who will discuss key issues capturing attention in North Carolina and around the nation, including bail reform, overcriminalization, and barriers to re-entry, such as fines and fees, the criminal record, and collateral consequences.  Join the conversation as they explore how these issues impact justice, public safety and economic prosperity in North Carolina, and whether there is common ground to address them.  This event will be free to attend, lunch will be provided, and it offers 5 hours of CJE and free CLE credit.  Attendees are responsible for their travel expenses, including a $14 event parking fee.  For those arriving the night before, state rate and discounted rooms at local hotels will be available.  To apply for this course and find more details, please visit here.  Applicants will be notified regarding acceptance no later than February 15th.

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The Office of the Juvenile Defender will be hosting a Juvenile Court Basics CLE on Feb. 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Cumberland County Courthouse.  Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes will be discussing the role of counsel, how to communicate with juvenile clients, dispositions, capacity, appeals, and so much more.  Questions and concerns are welcome.  Three general CLE credit hours are currently pending for this training.   Please contact Marcus Thompson by email or call 919-890-1650 if you have questions.

Save the date!  The 2019 Regional Training for Indigent Defense: Special Issues in Complex Felony Cases will be held on March 21 at the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C.  The training will focus on topics relevant to criminal law practitioners and is open to IDS contract attorneys and privately assigned counsel.  Participants will receive three general CLE credit hours.  Registration should open later this month.

New Resource

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is delighted to share the updated 2018-2019 version of their Juvenile Defense Policy and Practice Career Resource Guide, which is intended to help law students prepare for a career in juvenile defense or juvenile justice policy reform.  Many law students, even those who are interested in criminal law, are not aware that juvenile defense, as a specialized practice, is a viable career option, and one that draws on many of the same motivations and skills as criminal defense.  Those students who are aware of juvenile defense have told NJDC they find it difficult to prepare for the job search in this field.  To that end, NDJC created this Career Resource Guide, which they hope will raise the profile of and help students prepare for a career in juvenile defense or juvenile justice policy reform.  The Guide includes information on coursework and externships that will help strengthen a candidate’s application in the juvenile defense field; resources to guide in the search for juvenile defense jobs, fellowships, and funding opportunities; and a list of offices around the country that provide employment and internship opportunities specific to juvenile defense.

From Around the Community

On Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m., Duke Law School Professor Brandon L. Garrett and the Duke Criminal Law Society will be presenting and releasing their newest study, “Juvenile Life Without Parole in North Carolina”.  Garrett was awarded a grant from the Charles Koch Foundation to study evidence to inform criminal justice policy.  Through his research, Garrett prepared a report and will be sharing his findings with all attorneys working on juvenile cases at this event.  For further information, please direct questions to Callie Thomas.

Job Opportunities

On Dec. 1, Indigent Defense Services issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) in Caswell, Person, Alamance, Orange, and Chatham counties.  The current contracts for adult noncapital criminal cases at the trial level and per session court cases in those districts will expire on May 31 and renew on June 1.  The RFP (RFP #16-0002R) seeks services for adult noncapital criminal cases at the trial level, juvenile delinquency, abuse/neglect/dependency and termination of parental rights, and treatment courts.  Please note that the RFP will not seek offers for potentially capital cases at the trial level, direct appeals or post-conviction cases.  Also, the juvenile delinquency RFP will only include Caswell, Alamance, and Person counties.  The deadline for electronic offers is Feb. 15.  To access the RFP, please check here.

This is it for this week.  There should be more to come next Friday, but in the meantime, check out OJD’s Twitter and Facebook for posts throughout the week.

OJD Week in Review: Mar. 5-9

This week we’ve got a new update regarding Raise the Age, a valuable resource for defenders and, as usual, we’ve got some new training opportunities and job opportunities for you as well.

New JJAC Report

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The Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) released its first report on Mar. 1, which can now be found on our “Raise the Age” page under the “Information for Defenders” tab.  We’ve added a new section to the “Raise the Age” page dedicated to providing updates from JJAC to allow everyone to follow the Committee’s progress.  This report details the key implementation dates for initiatives proposed in the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act, the Committee’s requests for a unified video conferencing system, recommendations for transfer and housing of juveniles, requests from JJAC, OJD, and the Administrative Office of the Courts for additional funding, staff and other resources, dates for community and stakeholder forums, and other recommendations and plans of JJAC and its subcommittees.  A summary of the JJAC meeting prior to the report can be found here on our site.

Job/Fellowship Opportunities

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is currently hiring a strategic communications manager.  The individual in this position will be responsible for crafting organizational messaging, overseeing editorial excellence, and working with leadership to implement a communications strategy that is creative, forward-thinking, and reflective of NJDC’s vision.  This position will remain opened until filled.  To find further info about the position and how to apply, please go here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) is now accepting applications for its 2018-19 Youth Justice Leadership Institute.  This is an annual year-long fellowship program that selects 10 people of color working as professionals in the juvenile justice field to participate in a curriculum to develop their leadership and advocacy skills.  The fellowship can be completed with the fellows’ current employment, so those selected will not have to leave their jobs to participate in the Institute.  The fellowship will include two fully financed retreats, mentoring and frequent distance learning opportunities.  NJJN has already hosted one informational webinar on Mar. 8 and will host the next on Apr. 2.  To register for one of this webinar, please visit here.  Applications for the Institute (found here) must be submitted by Apr. 23.

 

Training

JD Leadship Summit 2018Save the Date!  NJDC will be hosting the 2018 Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit in St. Paul, Minnesota on Oct. 26-28.  We will be sure to provide further details for this event as they arrive.

Disability Rights North Carolina will be hosting its 2018 Disability Advocacy Conference on Apr. 19.  The conference offers five CLE credits for lawyers, including one credit hour for substance abuse/mental health awareness.  Sessions include parental rights, restrictive interventions in public schools, guardianship reforms, and a session exclusively tailored to attorneys titled “Recognizing and Responding to a Lawyer with a Mental Health Disorder”, just to name a few.  To learn more about this event and register please visit their web page here.

On March 12, 2018, from 4 to 5 p.m. ET, the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators‘ Positive Youth Outcomes Committee will host “Classroom Excellence in Secure Residential Facilities.” This webinar will highlight work to improve the quality of education provided to at-risk, low-income, minority teenagers and young adults who are attending schools in alternative settings, including youth correctional facilities.  You can register for the webinar here.

New Resources

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has released the Juvenile Residential Facility Census Databook, the latest addition to the Data Analysis Tools section of its Statistical Briefing Book. National and state data from 2000 to 2014 describing the characteristics of residential placement facilities that hold juvenile offenders are now available for analysis. This includes operation, classification, size, and crowding.

Events Around the Community

The North Carolina Bar Association Juvenile Justice and Children’s Rights Section will be holding a council meeting on March 22, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.  A networking reception will be held directly after the meeting at Whiskey Kitchen on 201 W. Martin St. and appetizers and a cash bar will be provided.  All section members and attorneys who could be members are welcome to attend and may RSVP here.

And that sums it up for this week.  We will have some more updates to our social media channels and more news you can use in the coming weeks, so please check back with us often.  Invitations are still open for guest bloggers and podcast guests as well, so feel free to reach out.  Until next week, we wish you well!

OJD Week in Review: Feb. 12-16

This week there is of course more training to come and a few other events and resources to note.  And we would also like to bring a special notice to the attention of  juvenile defenders:

A Quick Note from IDS

Indigent Defense Services continues to try to address the low hourly rates that resulted from the budget crisis in 2011.  We will once again ask for expansion funding to increase the rates $10 across the board as partial restoration of the pre-May 2011 rates.  However, we face an uphill battle as that cost is over $10 Million.

Earlier this year, we did identify availability in our budget to address a small portion of cases and increased the rate paid for High-Level Felonies (Class A-D) to $75/hour.  Attorneys and judges in delinquency court sometimes forget that the hourly rate for these higher level felonies is different than the usual $55/rate.  For cases disposed of prior to November 1, 2017 where the highest original charge was a Class A-D Felony, the hourly rate should be $70; for cases disposed of November 1, 2017, the rate is $75/hour.

Around the Defender Community

All juvenile justice advocates are welcome to come out to support Scott Holmes who will be honored at the Elna B. Spaulding Founder’s Award Partner’s for Peace Celebration.  Scott is an assistant clinical professor of law and supervising attorney of the Civil Litigation Clinic at North Carolina Central University.  He has long been a champion for the rights of children, immigrants, and the mentally ill and he has represented jail, protesters, Black Lives Matter protesters, families of minorities killed by police, and many other activists and disadvantaged groups.  The event will take place on  Thursday, March 22, from 6:30 to 8:30 at Hill House on 900 S. Street, Durham, N.C.  Advanced tickets are $30 and tickets can be purchased at the door for $35.  More event details can be found here.

Earlier this week, Youth First released a video titled “Jim Crow Juvenile Justice”.  The film explores the history of youth prisons, including the correlation between the 13th Amendment and the creation of these institutions, and examines the modern juvenile justice system from a racial-justice standpoint.  Please take a moment to view the short film here.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention will be hosting a webinar from 2-3 p.m. on Feb. 20 to provide information for its FY18 Juvenile Justice Emergency Planning Demonstration Program.  The webinar will cover project scope, eligibility requirements and other information for those interested in applying to support this project.  Please check out OJJDP’s website for more details and you can register here for the webinar.

Training Time, Y’all!

Registration is open for Higher-Level Felony Defense, Part I.  This training will take place April 9-10 and will offer 9.0 CLE credit hours.  Topics will include working with investigators and experts, building rapport with clients, investigation and discovery, the theory of defense, and third-party records.  Space is limited for only 36 participants, so please hurry if you are interested in participating!  Members of public defender offices should get approval from the Chief Public Defender to register and contractors and privately assigned counsel must receive a fellowship from IDS Director Tom Maher.  For more information on registration, the agenda, and hotel information please visit here.

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The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform(CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

We also would like to remind everyone that registration for the 2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents seminar is open until Monday, Feb. 19.  The seminar itself will take place on March 1 from 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. and it will offer 6 hours of CLE credit, including one hour of ethics/responsibility.  For registration, directions, and other details, please visit here.

New Resource

The National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics released a report earlier this week providing details from its survey of state criminal history information systems.  The survey was conducted by administrators of the state criminal history record repositories and offers information on topics ranging from noncriminal justice background checks to state criminal history files and accessibility to records and services through state repositories.  The report can be viewed here.

That is all for this week.  We will be updating our channels with new podcasts and other information & if you are interested in participating in a podcast or submitting a guest blog, please contact us to let us know.  We will also be providing more news regarding Raise the Age and other initiatives over time, so please be sure to keep up with us on all of our channels.

OJD Big Week Wrap-Up: Gault, H280, and Training

It’s been an eventful week for our office and just to keep everyone in the loop on what’s been going on, we’ve prepared a quick summary of the excitement for you here!

Monday, May 15, was the 50th anniversary of In re Gault.  Our office hosted a successful Twitter Town Hall with the help of representatives from the Administrative Office of the Courts, the N.C. Advocates for Justice, ACLU, the Council for Children’s Rights, the N.C. Bar Association, the Office of the Appellate Defender and others.  During the event we GAULTat50_TwitterTownHall_1discussed what it means to fulfill the promise of Gault and the need to raise the age of juvenile jurisdiction in N.C.  Governor Roy Cooper also chimed in using our hashtag, #Gault50NC, and his tweets for  were listed several times on the top tweets in NC!

Prior to the Twitter event, our office also debuted our video discussing Gault and Raise the Age on social media.  The video stars Communications and Office Manager Marcus Thompson and was created in collaboration with Chris Mears of AOC.

Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry also attended the Gault at 50 Gala in Washington, D.C that evening.  During the gala, Eric met with many other leaders in juvenile defense from across the country.

The National Juvenile Defender Center also released its report titled Access Denied: A National Snapshot of States’ Failure to Protect Children’s Right to Counsel, highlighting the shortcomings of states across the country in fulfilling the promise of Gault.

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The Annual Spring Public Defenders and Investigator Conference was held in Charlotte from May 17-19.  This was the first year two juvenile tracks were offered,  with one covering protection from ICE and another on education advocacy.  Our own Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes participated in the conference and also assisted in getting the two juvenile defense courses included this year.  (*applause* Great job, Kim!)

On Wednesday, House Bill 280, the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act, had its second hearing in the House.

Rep. Chuck McGrady, Rep Marcia Morey, and others stood to voice their support of the bill.  Arguments made in favor of the bill addressed the need to protect youth from physical assault in adult prisons, higher rates of recidivism among youth incarcerated with adults, the suffering of youth with disabilities in the justice system, and youth being imprisoned in the criminal system for crimes as simple as littering or performing harmless pranks.

Rep. Larry Pittman and others did stand to voice their concerns and opposition to the bill.  Pittman asked fellow representatives to forget that N.C. was standing alone in keeping 15 as the maximum age for juveniles, and “not to go easy on offenders based on age”, but to consider the victims of their crimes instead.  Some representatives only proposed that the bill be amended to include F-I felonies and other minor changes, but still voiced their support for raising the age.  Concerns about recurring gang activity among youth who are given too much leniency in juvenile court were also brought up.  The most common point of opposition seemed to be about the budget.

In closing, McGrady addressed the opposition, saying that there is a budget in place and pointing out that there were more people complaining about the costs than the law itself.  In the end, the bill was passed in a 104-8 vote!

We want to celebrate these successes and also look for more opportunities to improve the juvenile justice system in N.C.  There are still plenty of training events scheduled for the remainder of the year, more work to be done in the protection of children’s rights, and a lot of preparation for when N.C. finally raises the age.  Let’s continue gaining more successes and let us know your thoughts for what could be done going forward!

New Policy Recommendations by the National Juvenile Justice Network

From Sarah Breyer, Executive Director of the National Juvenile Justice Network:

August 3, 2016

New Policy Recommendations!

Every year, NJJN members draft and vote on policy platforms on key issues in youth justice. They’re meant to guide and influence the creation of policy and legislation.

This year, we produced a new policy platform on confidentiality (along with a related document with detailed recommendations to ensure youth records are kept confidential), and we revisited and updated our policy platform on sex offense registries and related laws. Click here to see them.

 

 

 

 

NC Division of Adult Corrections and Juvenile Justice Ends Juvenile Solitary Confinement

The North Carolina Department of Public Safety, Division of Adult Correction and Juvenile Justice is ending its use of solitary confinement for its youngest inmates housed in its adult prisons system and is introducing a new youthful offender program that more appropriately and effectively focuses on the needs of these young people. This program was announced last week.  Further details about the Youthful Offender Program can be found here.

New Report: Future Interrupted: The Collateral Damage Caused by Proliferation of Juvenile Records

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The Juvenile Law Center recently released Future Interrupted: The Collateral Damage Caused by Proliferation of Juvenile Records.  This document contains valuable information for defenders in providing clients with guidance on the impact of juvenile adjudications and how those adjudications may be held against them in the future.  Of particular interest would be the sections on the economic argument against proliferation of records, and the collateral consequences of juvenile adjudication adjudications, including educational and employment impacts.