OJD and NJDC Host Training to Prepare for Raising the Age

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NJDC’s Amanda Powell engages in discussion with trainees

With Raise the Age’s full implementation now only several months away, OJD has been diligent in rolling out its North Carolina Juvenile Defender State Enhancement Program (SEP).  As part of this initiative, from Apr. 24 – 26 the Office of Juvenile Defender (OJD) partnered with the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) to teach 10 dedicated N.C. juvenile defense attorneys NJDC’s Juvenile Training Immersion Program (JTIP).

During the three-day training program, three NJDC trainers engaged juvenile defenders in various hands-on activities and discussions in preparation to be effective regional trainers of other defenders across the state.  Discussions ranged from the difficulties of representing juveniles to cultivating showmanship and employing adult learning theory.  Defenders were also put into pairs and small groups for some activities to encourage collaboration.

As one of the first pieces in the SEP project, funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), the purpose of JTIP was to allow OJD to offer more quality training to defenders statewide, while also providing more support from defenders who practice in the communities and regions they will train in.  JTIP is meant specifically for trainer presentation, but does not offer substantive training on the new law.

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NJDC’s Amanda Powell discusses showmanship.

Also as a result of the OJJDP grant, Project Attorney Monique Williams joined the OJD team earlier this year.  As project attorney, she has done extensive investigations of juvenile courts in multiple counties, collected data, and devised new training to prepare N.C. juvenile defenders for the full implementation of Raise the Age.

“The JTIP training was absolutely the highlight of my tenure here as the Project Attorney for the OJJDP grant,” said Williams.  “I was able to sit in on some of the sessions, and the vast materials and concepts imparted by NJDC to our N.C. attorneys will not only enhance their instructional facilitation skills, but their practice skills as well.  I am certain that juvenile advocates across the state of N.C. will be educated and empowered by the content that will be shared with them in the coming future, and I am excited to see the positive impact in representation for our clients.”

Dorothy Hairston Mitchell, assistant clinical professor of law and supervising attorney of the Juvenile Law Clinic at North Carolina Central University (NCCU), was among the 10 participants selected for the program.  Mitchell and other members of NCCU’s staff were instrumental in assisting with preparations for the training.

“[North Carolina Central University] was so excited to host this training and the collaboration, working with Monique and everybody, was phenomenal,” Mitchell said.  “As a participant, I thought it was also phenomenal…  Really well put together.  I appreciated the way that they grouped us, they had us partnered up and, at least for my partner, I think we were perfectly paired.  And all of the people in our group, it seemed like everyone felt the same way…  I have not been to too many trainings where I come out like ‘Oh, my God, every single moment was just great!’, and this was one of them.”

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From right to left: NJDC’s Kristina Kersey, Tim Curry and Amanda Powell, and OJD’s Monique Williams

Although JTIP offers a more intensive 40-lesson program that spans multiple weeks, NJDC agreed to condense the training for the N.C. attorneys, providing them with the additional information, but simplifying the presentation to fit the three-day window.  Mitchell also stated that she was interested in learning more, saying that while she appreciated the experience, extending the training would have been the only thing she would have changed.  “It was very intense the way it was, but I would’ve appreciated [the longer training].  It was so good, that I had a longing for what we didn’t get.”

With JTIP now completed, the next steps in the SEP are to provide the regional and local trainings and follow up with trainers for future site visits.  Williams will also conduct further court observations, post-training evaluations, and surveys to help OJD assess what areas juvenile defenders may need more training in following Raise the Age’s full implementation.

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Group photo of new N.C. regional trainers and NJDC JTIP trainers.

 

 

2018 Year in Review

This past year has been a very eventful and exciting year for the juvenile defense community.  With N.C. now less than a year from the full implementation of the Raise the Age (RTA) legislation, which will raise the age of juvenile delinquency court jurisdiction, OJD has been working throughout 2018 to prepare attorneys around the state for the anticipated changes.

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Contracts & Trainings

Trainings:  OJD hosted multiple regional trainings around the state to discuss the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act (also known as the RTA legislation) and the office’s plans to address it going forward.  OJD also hosted various juvenile court basics trainings in different regions at the request of local attorneys and bar associations and will continue to do so upon request.  OJD also presented to law students and collaborated with other organizations, such as the N.C. Advocates for Justice Juvenile Defense Section, to train attorneys on RTA.

Contracts:  OJD established no new contracts this year, however there was a juvenile delinquency RFP issued and a few open contract positions filled through the year.  As part of the response to RTA, OJD will evaluate current contracts and observe court in all districts to determine where new contracts will be needed once the law is fully implemented.  Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes has also met with contractors in different districts to address issues and strategize on their cases.

Legislation

While there was no new legislation this year that OJD worked on, Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry continued to be active on the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) and the Legal Revisions and Legislative Issues Subcommittee, assisting in the planning and adjustments before the full implementation of RTA.  We also provide the most current information we can for frontline defenders and stakeholders pertaining to the changes to the law.

Outreach

This year OJD has continued to grow in our online presence.  We’ve continued to trend Dilemma of Dutiesupward with the numbers on social media and we still encourage all attorneys doing juvenile defense work in N.C. to join our Facebook/Twitter page.  On the OJD website, new content is still being added to the blog, and new resources are still being provided to prepare attorneys on the RTA page under the “Information for Defenders” tab.  We’ve also had some great new interviews on the OJD podcast, including a feature on Dr. Anne Corbin’s book, Dilemma of Duties, which focuses exclusively on attorneys in the N.C. juvenile justice system, and a discussion on juvenile psychological development and evaluations with Dr. Cindy Cottle.

In 2018, the bulk of our outreach efforts have been dedicated to education and the celebration of the passage of RTA, and also establishing relationships with organizations that have interest in the new legislation.  OJD has also met with N.C. Central University’s staff to strategize on how to utilize the technology available through their Virtual Justice Project to assist in outreach for 2019.

Direct Representation

OJD continues to provide direct representation of juvenile clients.  This has allowed our Office to observe and respond to trends in juvenile court as well as continue to have a presence in the courtroom.  OJD has represented juveniles in cases transferred from other districts and been able to identify issues for appeal and base trainings on issues that have arisen in multiple cases in various districts such as proper amendments to charges on petitions and improper dispositional levels.  Collaboration with defenders in other jurisdictions when we have juvenile clients in common has resulted in better outcomes for juveniles with petitions in multiple districts.

New Initiatives

With the implementation of RTA underway, OJD has executed its three-part plan to address the needs of defenders to absorb the increased number of cases.  This includes (1) developing virtual and in-person statewide and local conferences, trainings and presentations to keep defenders informed, (2) proposing a system of dedicated defenders through contracting with local defenders and consulting with public defender offices and contractors to determine the impact of potential increase in caseload, and (3) continuing to work on policy development as it pertains to RTA implementation.  Our office continues to update the RTA page on the OJD website with resources specifically related to the legislation and our plans, including summaries and a compilation of articles, and we will continue to update this page as more materials become available.

OJJDP Grant

Early in 2018, with the anticipated increase in the juvenile caseload once 16- and 17-year-olds enter the juvenile justice system as a result of RTA, OJD and the Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) applied for a federal grant offered through the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP).  The plan was to use the grant to help fund efforts to give attorneys access to more specialized training and resources and also increase our capacity for data collection over the next few years.  Fortunately, OJD was awarded the grant and has created the new Project Attorney position to assist in the planning and execution of virtual and in-person training statewide to better address juvenile defenders’ needs.  IDS has also created a new Juvenile Contract Specialist position to assist with the caseload increase.

OJD Week in Review: Aug. 13 – 17

Welcome back, everyone!  There is light news this week, but there are a few tidbits of information that might be of interest to you below.

Another OJD Spotlight On…

Before we get to the usual news, we would like to bring attention to a young man from Garner who wrote to our office recently with a personal request regarding school safety.  Lance Murphy, 16, of Garner Magnet High School, wrote Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry citing his concerns with the recent tragedies that have taken place within schools, including the one in Parkland, Fla.  In his writing, Murphy cites data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics and inquires about programs to aid at-risk youth, before concluding with the statement below:

“As North Carolina’s Juvenile Defender, I ask that you support programs that help rehabilitate juvenile offenders.  I also ask that you support programs that may help prevent at-risk youth from committing crimes to begin with.  Examples of this could include after-school care, community support groups, community sport leagues, community service, and job skills support.  All children should have an opportunity to become outstanding adults, even those who have made bad choices in the past.  I thank you for your service and time.  I anxiously await your reply.”

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While Zogry has sent his own reply to Murphy, perhaps we should also consider his heartfelt request as a call to action for all juvenile justice advocates and service providers.  It’s great that kids such as Murphy are considering preventative measures to keep more youth out of the justice system and addressing the fact that all kids, regardless of their actions, deserve the chance to prove themselves to be better adults.  We commend Murphy for speaking out on behalf of his peers and we also want to thank all those people who have actively worked to improve our communities and protect the future of our youth!

From Around the Community

cropped-whiteojd.pngOn Wednesday, Aug. 22, from 12 to 2 p.m., the Office of the Juvenile Defender will be hosting a Raise the Age Regional Informational Meeting in the Law Library of the Watauga County Courthouse (842 W. King Street) in Boone.  Juvenile defenders in District 24 and its surrounding districts are encouraged to attend.  During this meeting we will be discussing the Raise the Age law, OJD’s plans in response to the law, and what issues should be addressed going forward.  We encourage attendees to bring their lunch, as well as questions, comments and concerns.  We have a few other similar information meetings planned in other parts of the state, but if attorneys are interested in receiving more information, please feel free to reach out to our office and we will be happy to schedule a meeting/training with you!

On Thursday, Aug. 23, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., the OJJDP-funded Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program will host the “Internet Crimes Against Children/KeepSafe Incident Response Tool for Schools” webinar.  The webinar will discuss a free resource designed to help schools respond to technology-related incidents, including cyberbullying, sexting, hacking, and threats of violence.  The webinar will also identify how school officials can use this tool to work with law enforcement and other stakeholders to investigate and develop responses to all types of technology-related incidents.  If you are interested, please register here.

Training

Registration is now open for the 2018 Misdemeanor Defender Training, which will take place at the UNC-Chapel Hill campus from Sept. 18 – 21.  This training, cosponsored by the Office of Indigent Defense Services and the School of Government, will be an introductory program for attorneys who are new to handling misdemeanor cases and will offer 21.5 CLE credit hours, including one hour of ethics/professional responsibility credit and qualifies for criminal law specialization credit.  Attendees can expect sessions that will cover topics such as impaired driving, probation violations, ethical issues in district court, and much more.  The registration deadline will be 5 p.m. on Aug. 30 and the deadline for the hotel block will be Aug. 28.  There will be no onsite registration.  The fee for privately assigned counsel will be $560, but the program will be free for IDS state employees.  There is a new online registration system being used that will require first-time users to create an account, but if any issues should arise, please contact registration@sog.unc.edu/919.966.4414 or check the FAQ page.  For further questions contact either Tanya Jisa or Phil Dixon,Jr.

Save the Date!  The Bridging The Gap III Seminar will be in Winston-Salem September 20-21, 2018.  Participants in this seminar will be awarded 10.25 CLE credit hours, including 1.5 credit hours in ethics, professional responsibility and professionalism.  The registration fee is $115.00.  The focus of this seminar will be on client and family relations, and pretrial resolution.  Registration and hotel information will be published in early July.  A block of 40 rooms will be available once the registration is published.  For an attorney to attend he or she must have at least 7 years’ experience.  The “ gap” in Bridging The Gap describes lawyers who have never taken murder cases and are considering taking them on, and lawyers who have taken non-capital murder cases and are considering taking capital cases.  The seminar, hosted by the Office of the Capital Defender, focuses on issues relevant to both non-capital and capital murder cases.  If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Terry Alford.

That sums it up for this week!  The near-future for news in the juvenile defense community is looking good, so check back soon!

OJD Week in Review: Mar. 5-9

This week we’ve got a new update regarding Raise the Age, a valuable resource for defenders and, as usual, we’ve got some new training opportunities and job opportunities for you as well.

New JJAC Report

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The Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) released its first report on Mar. 1, which can now be found on our “Raise the Age” page under the “Information for Defenders” tab.  We’ve added a new section to the “Raise the Age” page dedicated to providing updates from JJAC to allow everyone to follow the Committee’s progress.  This report details the key implementation dates for initiatives proposed in the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act, the Committee’s requests for a unified video conferencing system, recommendations for transfer and housing of juveniles, requests from JJAC, OJD, and the Administrative Office of the Courts for additional funding, staff and other resources, dates for community and stakeholder forums, and other recommendations and plans of JJAC and its subcommittees.  A summary of the JJAC meeting prior to the report can be found here on our site.

Job/Fellowship Opportunities

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is currently hiring a strategic communications manager.  The individual in this position will be responsible for crafting organizational messaging, overseeing editorial excellence, and working with leadership to implement a communications strategy that is creative, forward-thinking, and reflective of NJDC’s vision.  This position will remain opened until filled.  To find further info about the position and how to apply, please go here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) is now accepting applications for its 2018-19 Youth Justice Leadership Institute.  This is an annual year-long fellowship program that selects 10 people of color working as professionals in the juvenile justice field to participate in a curriculum to develop their leadership and advocacy skills.  The fellowship can be completed with the fellows’ current employment, so those selected will not have to leave their jobs to participate in the Institute.  The fellowship will include two fully financed retreats, mentoring and frequent distance learning opportunities.  NJJN has already hosted one informational webinar on Mar. 8 and will host the next on Apr. 2.  To register for one of this webinar, please visit here.  Applications for the Institute (found here) must be submitted by Apr. 23.

 

Training

JD Leadship Summit 2018Save the Date!  NJDC will be hosting the 2018 Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit in St. Paul, Minnesota on Oct. 26-28.  We will be sure to provide further details for this event as they arrive.

Disability Rights North Carolina will be hosting its 2018 Disability Advocacy Conference on Apr. 19.  The conference offers five CLE credits for lawyers, including one credit hour for substance abuse/mental health awareness.  Sessions include parental rights, restrictive interventions in public schools, guardianship reforms, and a session exclusively tailored to attorneys titled “Recognizing and Responding to a Lawyer with a Mental Health Disorder”, just to name a few.  To learn more about this event and register please visit their web page here.

On March 12, 2018, from 4 to 5 p.m. ET, the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators‘ Positive Youth Outcomes Committee will host “Classroom Excellence in Secure Residential Facilities.” This webinar will highlight work to improve the quality of education provided to at-risk, low-income, minority teenagers and young adults who are attending schools in alternative settings, including youth correctional facilities.  You can register for the webinar here.

New Resources

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has released the Juvenile Residential Facility Census Databook, the latest addition to the Data Analysis Tools section of its Statistical Briefing Book. National and state data from 2000 to 2014 describing the characteristics of residential placement facilities that hold juvenile offenders are now available for analysis. This includes operation, classification, size, and crowding.

Events Around the Community

The North Carolina Bar Association Juvenile Justice and Children’s Rights Section will be holding a council meeting on March 22, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.  A networking reception will be held directly after the meeting at Whiskey Kitchen on 201 W. Martin St. and appetizers and a cash bar will be provided.  All section members and attorneys who could be members are welcome to attend and may RSVP here.

And that sums it up for this week.  We will have some more updates to our social media channels and more news you can use in the coming weeks, so please check back with us often.  Invitations are still open for guest bloggers and podcast guests as well, so feel free to reach out.  Until next week, we wish you well!

OJD Week in Review: Feb. 12-16

This week there is of course more training to come and a few other events and resources to note.  And we would also like to bring a special notice to the attention of  juvenile defenders:

A Quick Note from IDS

Indigent Defense Services continues to try to address the low hourly rates that resulted from the budget crisis in 2011.  We will once again ask for expansion funding to increase the rates $10 across the board as partial restoration of the pre-May 2011 rates.  However, we face an uphill battle as that cost is over $10 Million.

Earlier this year, we did identify availability in our budget to address a small portion of cases and increased the rate paid for High-Level Felonies (Class A-D) to $75/hour.  Attorneys and judges in delinquency court sometimes forget that the hourly rate for these higher level felonies is different than the usual $55/rate.  For cases disposed of prior to November 1, 2017 where the highest original charge was a Class A-D Felony, the hourly rate should be $70; for cases disposed of November 1, 2017, the rate is $75/hour.

Around the Defender Community

All juvenile justice advocates are welcome to come out to support Scott Holmes who will be honored at the Elna B. Spaulding Founder’s Award Partner’s for Peace Celebration.  Scott is an assistant clinical professor of law and supervising attorney of the Civil Litigation Clinic at North Carolina Central University.  He has long been a champion for the rights of children, immigrants, and the mentally ill and he has represented jail, protesters, Black Lives Matter protesters, families of minorities killed by police, and many other activists and disadvantaged groups.  The event will take place on  Thursday, March 22, from 6:30 to 8:30 at Hill House on 900 S. Street, Durham, N.C.  Advanced tickets are $30 and tickets can be purchased at the door for $35.  More event details can be found here.

Earlier this week, Youth First released a video titled “Jim Crow Juvenile Justice”.  The film explores the history of youth prisons, including the correlation between the 13th Amendment and the creation of these institutions, and examines the modern juvenile justice system from a racial-justice standpoint.  Please take a moment to view the short film here.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention will be hosting a webinar from 2-3 p.m. on Feb. 20 to provide information for its FY18 Juvenile Justice Emergency Planning Demonstration Program.  The webinar will cover project scope, eligibility requirements and other information for those interested in applying to support this project.  Please check out OJJDP’s website for more details and you can register here for the webinar.

Training Time, Y’all!

Registration is open for Higher-Level Felony Defense, Part I.  This training will take place April 9-10 and will offer 9.0 CLE credit hours.  Topics will include working with investigators and experts, building rapport with clients, investigation and discovery, the theory of defense, and third-party records.  Space is limited for only 36 participants, so please hurry if you are interested in participating!  Members of public defender offices should get approval from the Chief Public Defender to register and contractors and privately assigned counsel must receive a fellowship from IDS Director Tom Maher.  For more information on registration, the agenda, and hotel information please visit here.

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The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform(CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

We also would like to remind everyone that registration for the 2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents seminar is open until Monday, Feb. 19.  The seminar itself will take place on March 1 from 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. and it will offer 6 hours of CLE credit, including one hour of ethics/responsibility.  For registration, directions, and other details, please visit here.

New Resource

The National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics released a report earlier this week providing details from its survey of state criminal history information systems.  The survey was conducted by administrators of the state criminal history record repositories and offers information on topics ranging from noncriminal justice background checks to state criminal history files and accessibility to records and services through state repositories.  The report can be viewed here.

That is all for this week.  We will be updating our channels with new podcasts and other information & if you are interested in participating in a podcast or submitting a guest blog, please contact us to let us know.  We will also be providing more news regarding Raise the Age and other initiatives over time, so please be sure to keep up with us on all of our channels.

OJD Week In Review: Jan. 29-Feb. 2

This week we’ve been promoting some great new resources and opportunities, and continuing our momentum from the past few days, we just want to rehash a few things and introduce some other good nuggets for you all:

NCCRED Wants YOU

NCCREDThe North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) has opened applications for a new executive director.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Applications will be accepted until Feb. 15.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

New Resources

The North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients.  As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  In order to assist counsel in meeting the requirement of Padilla, IDS has contracted with two experienced immigration attorneys who will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.  An Immigration Consequences page has been added to IDS’ website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) has recently launched a Teen Dating Violence feature on its website.  This page offers links to the National Dating Abuse Helpline along with various publications and other resources to help victims and others involved with people who need aid or just want to be educated on the issue.   Their pages also provide further links to information on domestic violence, sexual assault, and “special populations”, including juveniles.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also released an updated review on “Interactions Between Youth and Law Enforcement“.  This document compiles research from various organizations, analyzing youth-initiated and police-initiated interactions, the impacts of such interactions on the juvenile justice system, police training programs, diversion programs and more.  The full review can be found here.

Training Opportunities

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favoriteThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

 

That will be all for this week.   There is plenty more to come in the next few weeks, so check back here early and often.  Also, if there is anything anyone in the N.C. juvenile defense community would like to submit to us to promote on our website and other channels, be sure to contact us and let us know.  We are always here to support you!

OJD Week in Review: Jan. 22-26

We’re bringing more reminders than big updates this week, but as always we’ve got a few good tidbits of news you can use.

Your Usual Training News

Earlier this week we posted that registration is now open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training.  Cosponsored by the Office of Indigent Defense Services and the School of Government, this training will be held on March 9 at the UNC School of Government, starting at 8:45 a.m. and ending at 4:15 p.m.  The training will be geared towards attorneys who represent youth in juvenile and superior court and will cover topics including sentencing, mitigation, parole hearings, transfer hearings and the future of Miller cases.  In our previous post we provide details for hotel information, travel reimbursement and registration.

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We’d also like to remind everyone that registration for “Regional Training for Indigent Defense: Defending Sexual Offenses” closes Monday, Jan. 29, at 5 p.m.  This CLE, hosted by the UNC School of Government, will focus on defending sexual offenses with sessions on physical evidence, cross-examining experts, and motions and legal issues.  The event will be held on Feb. 8, 2018 at 1801 Nash St., Sanford, N.C. in the Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center.  This program is open to all IDS contract attorneys and privately assigned counsel representing indigent clients and will offer 3.0 hours of CLE credit.  There is an $85 registration fee that will cover CLE credits, snacks, and materials.  Please find further details and register here.

New Resources

If you’re in need of CLE credits before the annual deadline, the Indigent Defense Education Group at the School of Government is ready and waiting to help.  With on-demand courses taught by experienced staff and legal professionals, you have the option to take a course for free if you just want to learn something new for the day or pay a fee to obtain your required CLE time.  This should be a valuable resource for all defenders, offering courses in many areas including ethics, mental health/substance abuse, and more.  You can access the on-demand content library here.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also added a new snapshot to its Statistical Briefing Book, focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system.  This new file offers statistics on the types of offenses committed by girls and comparisons of arrests for certain crimes between males and females, with data gathered up to 2015.  You can find the newest entry in the Statistical Briefing Book here and also check out other recent updates to the database here.

facebookThat completes the news for this week.  We still encourage all stakeholders in the juvenile defense community to feel free to contact us about submitting guest blogs or joining us on our podcast.  And for those of you who are new to juvenile defense, or if you know someone who is interested in juvenile defense, be sure to contact us to be added to our listserv, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter as well.