OJD Week In Review: Nov. 13-17

This week we would like to bring attention to a few training opportunities and at least one new job opportunity.

Good Ol’ Education

yoda trainingThe Office of the Juvenile Defender and North Carolina Advocates for Justice will be hosting a free juvenile defense CLE in Courtroom 1 of the Wayne County Courthouse on 224 E. Walnut St. in Goldsboro, N.C. on Thursday, Dec. 14.  The training, titled “Juvenile Defense – Effective Representation Now and For the Future”, will be held from 1-4 p.m. and a networking lunch will be provided from 12-1.  Presenters will include IDS Regional Defender Valerie Pearce, Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes, and Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry.  Topics discussed will include detention advocacy, the role of counsel and dispositional advocacy and tips and expected practice changes following the implementation of Raise the Age.  Please RSVP with Valerie Pearce by email or call 919-667-3369.

 

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) has released a bulletin on trauma-informed classrooms, which examines how trauma on students and adverse life experiences can impact their behavior in the classroom and offers strategies for creating trauma-informed classrooms.  In addition to this, NCJFCJ will also be hosting a free 90-minute webinar titled “Trauma-Informed Classrooms: Moving Theory into Practice” on Dec. 6, starting at noon.  The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention also has a webpage dedicated to raising awareness on trauma’s impact on children exposed to violence, which can be found here.

The Council of State Governments Justice Center will also be leading a webinar on Tuesday, Nov. 28, from 2-3 p.m. titled “Collateral Consequences of Juvenile Adjudication – How Juvenile Records Can Affect Youth Even After the Case is Over.”  To register and find more info on this please check here.

Your Future Job (?)

The Council of State Governments Justice Center has an opening for a project manager in juvenile justice.  This is a regular full-time position located in either New York, N.Y. or Bethesda, MD.  For the full details and to apply for these positions (and others), please visit their website here.

batman job

That is all for this week, but we would still like to remind the N.C. juvenile defense community to feel free to reach out to us with any questions, comments, or concerns.  Also, feel free to contribute your voice to our blog or podcast.  New points of view are always welcome!  In the meantime, have a great weekend and be assured there will be more to come soon!

Chief Justice Addresses #RaisetheAgeNC Again at Press Conference

On Monday, Chief Justice Mark Martin held a press conference at the N.C. Legislative Building to offer updates and remind the public of the importance of North Carolina raising the age of juvenile jurisdiction.  Martin and other speakers revisited the benefits of the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act, House Bill 280, which was introduced in March, and echoed the recommendations on juvenile justice reinvestment presented in the North Carolina Commission on the Administration of Law and Justice’s final report.

As expected, after the attention H280 received in March and the recent move by New York to raise the age of juvenile jurisdiction, there was tremendous support again for N.C. to move forward with the bill.  Judge Martin was joined by Former Rep. Tom Murry, Wake County Sheriff Donnie Harrison, Former Lt. Gov. James Gardner, Superintendent of Public Instruction Mark Johnson, Former Chief District Court Judge Marcia Morey, who now has a seat in the N.C. House of Representatives, along with several others in support of raising the age.

RTA

Chief Justice Martin stated that over 90 percent of parents thought that the maximum age for juvenile jurisdiction was already 18, and while there are 11 counties where young people are diverted to the juvenile system, 89 still remain where they are not.

Comparisons were made to other states, illustrating the disadvantages youth in N.C. face when measured against states such as Tennessee, where young people under the age of 18 are not automatically turned over to criminal court for minor offenses.  Former Lt. Gov. Gardner even pointed out how competitive the job market already is for young people today, whether they have been involved in the justice system or not, referring to his grandson who is an Eagle Scout with no criminal record.

Sheriff Harrison stated that he believed raising the age is needed in N.C., but he also acknowledged that money would be needed to make the necessary transitions.  He emphasized his belief in the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act saying, “I think this initiative will stop some crime… I know it will.”

Murry drove home the point, saying, “We already have Raise the Age in every state.  Now we need to bring the promise to N.C.

Additionally, with the anniversary of In re Gault close at hand, William Lassiter, Deputy Commissioner of Juvenile Justice at the N.C. Dept. of Public Safety stated, “The Gault decision was one of the precursors to raising the age.  It really has effected how the juvenile justice system has been set up in our country, and North Carolina is kind of lagging behind because we haven’t raised the age.  So, it would be sweet justice if we could pass Raise the Age on the 50th anniversary of Gault.”