OJD Week in Review: Feb. 5-9

This week there are some great opportunities for work, training and community building in juvenile defense.

Job Post Reminder and a Nice Little Feature

We want to remind everyone that the North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) will be closing applications for its executive director position on Feb. 15.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

NCCRED

If you haven’t already heard, the UNC School of Government recently added a post promoting the General Counsel Office of the Administrative Office of the Courts.  This post is a Q&A with LaToya Powell, former law professor of UNC and the new assistant legal counsel for the Office of General Counsel, working primarily in juvenile justice.  In the article, written by Austine Long, Powell discusses challenges in her new role, making an impact on Raise the Age, and her personal interest in juvenile justice.  You can read Austine’s post here.

Training for a Better You

On June 12-14, 2018, Global Youth Justice will host its 19th Global Youth Justice Training Institute in Cape Cod, MA.  Through more than 25 presenters, sessions, and workshops, participants will learn strategies to establish or enhance local volunteer-driven juvenile justice and youth justice diversion programs called Teen/Youth/Student/Peer Court or Peer Jury.  Topics will include youth and adult volunteer training; quality community service placements, programmatic enhancements, and operational strategies, administrative tips, grant writing, identifying funding opportunities, and more.  This will be the first year that both adults and youth will be able to attend.  To register and learn more about this exciting event, please check the website here.

training toy storyThe UNC School of Government is excited to announce that the “2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents” seminar has been rescheduled to Thursday, March 1 and registration is now open.  This full-day seminar provides training for attorneys who represent alleged contemnors in child support enforcement proceedings.  The seminar will begin with sessions on the requirements for civil and criminal contempt and the dispositional alternatives available to the trial court.  It continues with presentations on understanding the state and federal regulations, community resources for your clients, and advocacy in child support contempt cases.  The seminar also includes a one hour ethics session.  This training is open to public defenders and private attorneys who do appointed work and is geared toward attorneys who represent respondents in child support enforcement proceedings.  Pre-registration is required, there will be no onsite registration, and space is limited.  The registration deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 19.  To register online, as well as to find directions and other program information (including our cancellation and refund policy), please visit here.  If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact Tanya Jisa, Program Manager, jisa@sog.unc.edu or 919-843-8981, or Austine Long, Program Attorney, at along@sog.unc.edu or 919.962.9594.

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform(CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program until March 2.  This program will take place June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  The training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  For further details on this program and how to apply, please check out the link here.

That will be all for this week.  We will have more to come soon and we encourage you all to check back soon for updates and fresh announcements.

OJD Week In Review: Jan. 29-Feb. 2

This week we’ve been promoting some great new resources and opportunities, and continuing our momentum from the past few days, we just want to rehash a few things and introduce some other good nuggets for you all:

NCCRED Wants YOU

NCCREDThe North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) has opened applications for a new executive director.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Applications will be accepted until Feb. 15.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

New Resources

The North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients.  As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  In order to assist counsel in meeting the requirement of Padilla, IDS has contracted with two experienced immigration attorneys who will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.  An Immigration Consequences page has been added to IDS’ website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) has recently launched a Teen Dating Violence feature on its website.  This page offers links to the National Dating Abuse Helpline along with various publications and other resources to help victims and others involved with people who need aid or just want to be educated on the issue.   Their pages also provide further links to information on domestic violence, sexual assault, and “special populations”, including juveniles.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also released an updated review on “Interactions Between Youth and Law Enforcement“.  This document compiles research from various organizations, analyzing youth-initiated and police-initiated interactions, the impacts of such interactions on the juvenile justice system, police training programs, diversion programs and more.  The full review can be found here.

Training Opportunities

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favoriteThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

 

That will be all for this week.   There is plenty more to come in the next few weeks, so check back here early and often.  Also, if there is anything anyone in the N.C. juvenile defense community would like to submit to us to promote on our website and other channels, be sure to contact us and let us know.  We are always here to support you!

NCCRED Seeks a New Executive Director

The North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) is now accepting applications for an executive director.

The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.

To learn more about the job description and how to apply, please see the Indeed post here.

NCCRED

NCCRED is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that works across professional, political and ideological lines to identify, document and reduce racial disparities in North Carolina’s criminal justice system.  NCCRED brings together a diverse group of criminal justice leaders who share a commitment to building a more equitable, effective and humane criminal justice system in North Carolina.  Represented on the Commission are members of the Judiciary (Court of Appeals, Superior Court and District Court Judges), law enforcement professionals (Chiefs of Police and Department of Corrections), District Attorneys, Public Defenders, community advocates and scholars.  The Commission provides a forum for open dialogue, collective problem solving, information sharing and educating Commissioners on the most important developments in racially equitable criminal justice reform in North Carolina and across the nation.  NCCRED’s focus areas are pretrial justice, juvenile justice and policing.

 

OJD Week In Review: Nov. 6-10

This week we’ve got a few new resources and updates for you, just in case you haven’t already got them in your own inbox.

In the Week Behind Us

Last week the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice released a report titled “Developmental Reform in Juvenile Justice: Translating the Science of Adolescent Development to Sustainable Best Practice“.  This report is designed to assist local- and state-level organizations with incorporating “adolescent development research into their efforts to maximize improved and sustainable youth outcomes and system performance.”

Wake U

Also last week, NCCRED in collaboration with the Wake Forest University School of Law and Justice Program, the Wake Forest Journal of Law and Policy and the Wake Forest University Rethinking Community series held its Community Policing Symposium on Nov. 3.  The event featured a virtual lecture, a video presentation, and several discussions on how to improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve.  The summary for the event can be read here.

 

Lots of NJJN News

First in National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) news, we wanted to notify everyone that NJJN has  released a call to action to combat racism.  In their statement, NJJN acknowledges efforts in America’s history for civil rights and addresses the shortcomings of the juvenile justice system, particularly for youth of color, but also pointing out the marginalization of LGBTQI youth, children with disabilities and others.  NJJN also asks juvenile justice advocates to evaluate how we have approached racial injustice, to identify leadership, and  ask how we are held accountable.  Please take a moment to read the full article, which can be found here.

Secondly, NJJN has launched a campaign offering recommendations to improve relationships between police and youth of color.  They have a page on their website with a downloadable PDF with data and suggestions for distribution, and a press release template to help groups and individual advocates spread the word and get others involved.

Finally, NJJN has also announced that the Youth Justice Project will be hosting the #NJJNForum2018 in Durham.  This forum will celebrate the passage of Raise the Age in North Carolina and address much-needed reforms, such as eliminating collateral consequences, remedying racial and gender disparities, better access to defense for youth, and stemming the tide of referrals from schools to courts.  Currently, the organizations are seeking volunteers to join the Forum Planning Committee.  Please email Alyson Clements for more details.

Police Platform

More Useful Info

Earlier this week, the North Carolina Bar Association published an article by Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry about the National Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit.  In his writing, Zogry gives a brief account of his experience during the 21st annual conference.  You can read his article here and check out the NJDC page for more info on the Summit.

The Pew Charitable Trusts has created a chart, offering a visual display of data released from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  The data shows the declining rates of adjudicated youth  from 2006-2015, by state.  You can see the chart here.

From the On the Civil Side blog, Professor LaToya Powell’s has a new entry, “The Juvenile Court Counselor’s Role As Gatekeeper.”  You can read Professor Powell’s latest post here.

…and a Final Reminder

We also want to offer one final reminder that the Center for Death Penalty Litigation will be closing applications for its new staff attorney position on Monday, November 13.  You can view the full details about this position and how to apply here.

That is all for now.  We hope everyone has a safe and relaxing Veteran’s Day and there is more to come soon, so be sure to check back with us!

OJD Week in Review: Oct. 2-6

This week we want to remind everyone of some upcoming events/deadlines, an update to a Court of Appeals decision and an old-but-new addition to our materials for defenders.

LeandroOn Oct. 13, from 9:30 to 1 p.m., the the UNC Center for Civil Rights and the UNC Education Law & Policy Society, Black Law Students Association, and National Lawyers Guild are sponsoring “Leandro at 20: Two Decades in Pursuit of a Sound Basic Education.”  This event commemorates the 20th anniversary of Leandro v. State.  Registration is free, but space is limited, so be sure to sign up now!

Also, a brief reminder to recent law school grads (Class of 2017 or 2018), that applications for the NJDC Gault Fellowship are due by Oct. 30.  You can find further details about this opportunity and how to apply in our previous post from last month.  njdc logo

The Wake Forest University School of Law has just announced that registration is now open for their upcoming symposium.  This event, titled “The New Law and Order: Working Toward Equitable Community-Centered Policing in North Carolina”, will be hosted by the WFU School of Law Criminal Justice Program, NCCRED, and the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy on Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Four hours of CLE credit will be offered for attending.  You can register on their website here, and for further info on the symposium please check here.

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We also need to thank Assistant Appellate Defender David Andrews for reminding us that the Court of Appeals vacated the adjudication in In re T.K. on Sept. 29.  Andrews writes: “The basis of the opinion was that the juvenile petition was defective because the court counselor did not sign the petition and check the box on the petition indicating that it had been approved for filing.

“After the Court of Appeals issued its opinion, the State filed a petition for discretionary review in the Supreme Court of North Carolina.  [Last Friday], the Supreme Court issued an order denying the petition, which means that the Court of Appeals opinion in In re T.K. stands and will remain undisturbed.  So . . . keep scrutinizing petitions to make sure that they are proper!”

We would also like to bring it to everyone’s attention that we have the materials from this year’s Juvenile Defender Conference now available on our website.  Apologies for not having it added sooner, and big thanks to Austine Long for notifying us.  If you need a refresher or if you just happened to miss the conference and would like to see what was covered, the electronic copy of the materials are now ready and waiting for you in the “School of Government” section under the “Materials for Defenders” tab.

Juvenile defenders and others are still encouraged to share if there is anything you wish to discuss on our blog or our new podcast!  We are expecting more updates for other events in the coming months and we will also have other activities to share from our office as well, so be sure to check back frequently!

Save the Date: NCCRED Syposium

The North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NC-CRED), the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy, and the Wake Forest School of Law Criminal Justice Program, present “The New Law and Order: Working Towards Equitable and Community-Centered Policing in North Carolina” on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1312. The event is free and open to the public.  Approval for up to four hours of Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit from the North Carolina Bar Association is pending approval.  The event is also scheduled to be a live webcast.

NC-CRED is a diverse group of criminal justice stakeholders—judges, police chiefs, district attorneys, public defenders, scholars and community advocates, who work collaboratively to identify, document and reduce racial disparities in North Carolina’s criminal justice system.  The symposium will bring together law enforcement, practicing attorneys, scholars and community advocates to discuss equitable reforms to address racial disparities in policing in North Carolina.

Wake U

NCCRED Pic

New L&O

Job Opportunity: NCCRED Seeks an Executive Director

NCCRED is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that works across professional, political and ideological lines to identify, document and reduce racial disparities in North Carolina’s criminal justice system. NCCRED brings together a diverse group of criminal justice leaders who share a commitment to building a more equitable, effective and humane criminal justice system in North Carolina.  Represented on the Commission are members of the Judiciary (Court of Appeal, Superior Court and District Court Judges), law enforcement professionals (Chiefs of Police and Department of Corrections), District Attorneys, Public Defenders, community advocates and scholars.  The Commission provides a forum for open dialogue, collective problem solving, information sharing and educating Commissioners on the most important developments in racially equitable criminal justice reform in North Carolina and across the nation.  NCCRED’s focus areas are pretrial justice, juvenile justice and policing.

Position Summary

The Executive Director will provide leadership and manage all aspects of the organization:

Organizational Leadership

  • Provide strategic vision, planning and execution in collaboration with 30 Commission members
  • Manage organizational budget and finances
  • Develop and implement grant, individual giving and other fund development plans while managing current grants
  • Develop relationships with potential partners: similar organizations, researchers, and potential funders
  • Manage public and internal communications needs, including the website, marketing materials, public speaking opportunities and media inquiries
  • Coordinate Board of Directors meetings: schedule, set agendas, prepare reports for Board
  • Recruit, hire, train, and supervise interns and contract staff as needed

Racial Equity Coalition Building

  • Build trust, collaboration and involvement among a professionally, politically and ideologically diverse Commission membership
  • Plan quarterly Commission meetings that serve as forum for discussion, learning and collaboration on important issues related to racial disparities in NC
  • Plan and provide relevant trainings and leaning opportunities for NCCRED Commission members and other stakeholder groups
  • Further develop and implement Commission decision-making process, on-boarding materials, Commission member roles and work to foster a clear, shared understanding of the Commission’s work internally and externally
  • Participate in coalitions with allied organizations in areas of mutual interest
  • Coordinate Commission committees and recruit Commission members and other stakeholders to be involved

Commission Committees & Initiatives

  • Manage committees comprised of Commission members and other stakeholders on pretrial justice, juvenile justice, policing, communications and research.
  • Keep up to date on current research in our focus areas and on the issue of race and the law in general
  • Work with committees to develop action plans and lead implementation of plans
  • Plan and hold symposia, events and trainings
  • Promote and develop research on racial disparities, drivers of disparities and remedies
  • Develop and partner to create racial impact statements on current and pending policy matters
  • Produce a race & justice email update to share newly-released research, analysis, event announcements and other resources
  • Partner with local jurisdictions on system reform efforts

Desired Experience, Education, Skills & Knowledge

  • Passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform
  • Experience with criminal justice reform, whether policy, research, legal or communitybased
  • Experience with and interest in all aspects of nonprofit organizational management
  • Excellent oral and written communications skills
  • Comfort with conflict, disagreement and robust dialogue among people with different viewpoints
  • Ability to manage and move forward a wide-variety of organizational priorities

NC-CRED is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, gender identity, age, disability, or gender.

To apply please submit resume, cover letter, and salary requirements to mary@ncaj.com by September 15th, 2017.  Please include email subject line “NCCED Director Position.”