2018 Year in Review

This past year has been a very eventful and exciting year for the juvenile defense community.  With N.C. now less than a year from the full implementation of the Raise the Age (RTA) legislation, which will raise the age of juvenile delinquency court jurisdiction, OJD has been working throughout 2018 to prepare attorneys around the state for the anticipated changes.

RTA

Contracts & Trainings

Trainings:  OJD hosted multiple regional trainings around the state to discuss the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act (also known as the RTA legislation) and the office’s plans to address it going forward.  OJD also hosted various juvenile court basics trainings in different regions at the request of local attorneys and bar associations and will continue to do so upon request.  OJD also presented to law students and collaborated with other organizations, such as the N.C. Advocates for Justice Juvenile Defense Section, to train attorneys on RTA.

Contracts:  OJD established no new contracts this year, however there was a juvenile delinquency RFP issued and a few open contract positions filled through the year.  As part of the response to RTA, OJD will evaluate current contracts and observe court in all districts to determine where new contracts will be needed once the law is fully implemented.  Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes has also met with contractors in different districts to address issues and strategize on their cases.

Legislation

While there was no new legislation this year that OJD worked on, Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry continued to be active on the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (JJAC) and the Legal Revisions and Legislative Issues Subcommittee, assisting in the planning and adjustments before the full implementation of RTA.  We also provide the most current information we can for frontline defenders and stakeholders pertaining to the changes to the law.

Outreach

This year OJD has continued to grow in our online presence.  We’ve continued to trend Dilemma of Dutiesupward with the numbers on social media and we still encourage all attorneys doing juvenile defense work in N.C. to join our Facebook/Twitter page.  On the OJD website, new content is still being added to the blog, and new resources are still being provided to prepare attorneys on the RTA page under the “Information for Defenders” tab.  We’ve also had some great new interviews on the OJD podcast, including a feature on Dr. Anne Corbin’s book, Dilemma of Duties, which focuses exclusively on attorneys in the N.C. juvenile justice system, and a discussion on juvenile psychological development and evaluations with Dr. Cindy Cottle.

In 2018, the bulk of our outreach efforts have been dedicated to education and the celebration of the passage of RTA, and also establishing relationships with organizations that have interest in the new legislation.  OJD has also met with N.C. Central University’s staff to strategize on how to utilize the technology available through their Virtual Justice Project to assist in outreach for 2019.

Direct Representation

OJD continues to provide direct representation of juvenile clients.  This has allowed our Office to observe and respond to trends in juvenile court as well as continue to have a presence in the courtroom.  OJD has represented juveniles in cases transferred from other districts and been able to identify issues for appeal and base trainings on issues that have arisen in multiple cases in various districts such as proper amendments to charges on petitions and improper dispositional levels.  Collaboration with defenders in other jurisdictions when we have juvenile clients in common has resulted in better outcomes for juveniles with petitions in multiple districts.

New Initiatives

With the implementation of RTA underway, OJD has executed its three-part plan to address the needs of defenders to absorb the increased number of cases.  This includes (1) developing virtual and in-person statewide and local conferences, trainings and presentations to keep defenders informed, (2) proposing a system of dedicated defenders through contracting with local defenders and consulting with public defender offices and contractors to determine the impact of potential increase in caseload, and (3) continuing to work on policy development as it pertains to RTA implementation.  Our office continues to update the RTA page on the OJD website with resources specifically related to the legislation and our plans, including summaries and a compilation of articles, and we will continue to update this page as more materials become available.

OJJDP Grant

Early in 2018, with the anticipated increase in the juvenile caseload once 16- and 17-year-olds enter the juvenile justice system as a result of RTA, OJD and the Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) applied for a federal grant offered through the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP).  The plan was to use the grant to help fund efforts to give attorneys access to more specialized training and resources and also increase our capacity for data collection over the next few years.  Fortunately, OJD was awarded the grant and has created the new Project Attorney position to assist in the planning and execution of virtual and in-person training statewide to better address juvenile defenders’ needs.  IDS has also created a new Juvenile Contract Specialist position to assist with the caseload increase.

OJD Spotlight: A Discussion on School-Justice Partnerships with LaToya Powell

As we observe and prepare for the full implementation of North Carolina’s plan to raise the age of juvenile jurisdiction, there are some elements of the new legislation that are worth highlighting, one of those being the mandate for school-justice partnerships.  The Office of the Juvenile Defender had the pleasure of sitting down with LaToya Powell to discuss the roll-out of the school-justice partnership project.

Office of the Juvenile Defender: Thank you for taking the time to be here with us today, LaToya.  Please tell us a little bit about yourself and your background in juvenile justice.

LaToya Powell: I have been working in the area of juvenile justice since I graduated law school in 2005.  First, as a prosecutor in Johnston County, then as an appellate attorney with the Attorney General’s Office where I handled juvenile delinquency appeals for the State.  After that, I worked as a law professor at the UNC School of Government, where I trained and advised North Carolina public officials, including juvenile court judges, prosecutors, juvenile defenders, and lawmakers.  Currently, I am with the Office of General Counsel at the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) where I work as the Assistant Legal Counsel responsible for addressing juvenile delinquency issues and policy changes like Raise the Age.

LaToya Powell headshotOJD:  What are school-justice partnerships?

LP:  A school-justice partnership is exactly what it says.  It’s a partnership between the schools and the courts and other community stakeholders, like law enforcement and juvenile justice, designed to reduce the school-to-prison pipeline.  The school-to-prison pipeline is what happens when schools rely heavily on exclusionary discipline, like suspensions, expulsions, and referring kids to court, to address minor misconduct in school.  We know from Juvenile Justice data that close to 50 percent of petitions are based on misconduct that happens at schools.  Ninety-four percent of those cases are minor misdemeanors, like simple assault, misdemeanor larceny, and disorderly conduct, such as a kid being disruptive in class or yelling at a teacher.  What we know from evidence is that when kids are referred to court, they are more likely to drop out of school, they are more likely to engage in future misconduct and they are more likely to be charged as an adult.  So not only does it produce negative outcomes for the students, but it also makes schools and communities less safe because it increases recidivism.

Rather than push kids out of school, school-justice partnerships keep kids in school where they have better outcomes.  And as a result of Raise the Age, we now have a directive from the Legislature to the Director of the AOC to create policies and procedures to expand school-justice partnerships throughout North Carolina.

OJD:  What results are you hoping to see from the expansion of school-justice partnerships?

LP:  What we would hope to see is a reduction in the number of school-based referrals that go to the court system, and as a result of that, better outcomes for students—greater academic achievement, lower dropout rates, increased graduation rates, safer schools—those are the main goals for this partnership.  Another thing that we hope to see is less disproportionality in the way that school discipline is administered because the school-to-prison pipeline has a disparate impact on certain groups of students, primarily students of color and disabled students.

OJD:  What questions or problems do you anticipate for these programs?

LP:  The biggest problem or obstacle that we anticipate is the lack of resources for schools that need to be able to address disruptive students without the need to suspend them or send them to court.  There are many counties in our state that have lots of programs, community-based and school-based, that support students who are misbehaving at school, but other counties are not so fortunate.  They don’t have as many resources or tools to help their teachers who have a classroom of 30 or more kids.  Often times, all they have is a school resource officer who they can ask “Can you help me with this kid who is disturbing my classroom?” So, we hope to see more funding to create additional programs that will serve this population of students.

We know that some of our counties have things like restorative justice programs, Teen Court programs, and other diversion programs that are very successful and produce really great results for children.  The Juvenile Jurisdiction Advisory Committee (JJAC), which is monitoring the implementation of Raise the Age, has requested additional resources from the Legislature to fund diversion programs for these school-justice partnerships.  Also, the AOC is creating a school-justice partnership toolkit that provides guidance on how to create and implement a school-justice partnership.

OJD:  How many counties in N.C. are currently implementing school-justice partnership programs and have there been any measurable levels of success?

LP:  To my knowledge there are at least six counties that currently have school-justice partnerships and several others are in the process of creating them.  New Hanover County established its school-justice partnership about two years ago under the leadership of Chief District Court Judge J. Corpening and under its model, schools use graduated responses to address minor misconduct.  A graduated response model is a tiered system of sanctions that essentially gives the child a second chance to get it right.  So, instead of a student immediately being arrested and charged the first time he or she gets into a fight, the school will first try to address the misconduct without resorting to exclusionary discipline.  For example, a teacher might reprimand the student or require the student to do an assignment that relates to the behavior.  And then the next time the student misbehaves, the school might refer the student to a program or a behavioral specialist at the school.  Under the graduated response model, a child would have to receive at least two graduated responses before a referral to court can be made.  As a result of this school-justice partnership, New Hanover County has reduced school-based referrals by 47 percent.

OJD:  What other solutions would you propose to derail the school-to-prison pipeline?

LP:  I think this project is going to help lots of children in North Carolina avoid contact with the juvenile justice system.  And that is really important, not just for our kids but also for our schools and our communities.  By reducing the population of students who are being referred to court for minor misconduct that happens at school, it will increase the capacity of the juvenile court system to serve the older population of juveniles, 16- and 17-year-olds, who will soon become a part of that system.  The successful implementation of Raise the Age is an important step in reducing the school to prison pipeline.

OJD:  How can people learn more about school-justice partnerships in North Carolina?

LP:  For more information about School Justice Partnership North Carolina, please visit SJP.nccourts.gov.

OJD Week in Review: May 21 – 25

Hello again.  This week we’ve got an update on the NCDPS website and a new program we thought would be worth promoting regarding school-justice partnerships.  Also, please note that some opportunities are closing soon.

New Resource

The North Carolina Department of Public Safety has added a Raise the Age page link to their homepage.  The RTA page was previously available, but with the new link it is much easier to locate.  This page contains links to multiple resources related to RTA including the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act, past presentations/reports on the need to raise the age, and documents explaining school-justice partnerships.

Job Opportunities

Applications for the Assistant Defender position with the Michigan State Appellate Defender Office’s (SADO) Juvenile Lifer Unit close today.  The Unit is composed of seven attorneys and four mitigation specialists representing over a hundred clients where prosecutors are again seeking life without parole sentences.  The ideal candidate will have experience in death penalty phase or juvenile lifer resentencing hearings, experience in both trial and appellate courts, and experience negotiating with prosecutors, preparing mitigation for clients, and working with expert witnesses.  The project is funded through October 2019 for now, but funding will likely continue as the work will not be complete by then.  To view the full job description and see how to apply please review the complete job posting here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

From Around the Community

The National Juvenile Justice Network will be hosting its 2018 Forum in Durham, N.C. from July 16 – 18 at the Duke University School of Law (210 Science Dr, Durham, NC 27708).  This event, co-hosted by the Youth Justice Project of the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and Duke Children’s Law Clinic, is meant to be a fun networking and training setting for juvenile justice advocates.  July 16 and 17 will be open to NJJN members only, and the final day will be open to the public.  For details on travel assistance, the current agenda, and lodging, please visit their site here.

Registration is now open for the 81st Annual National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Conference.  The event this year will take place at the Hyatt Regency Denver at the Colorado Convention Center from July 22 – 25.  The conference will offer presentations/training tracks on  topics such as family law, juvenile justice, child welfare, and family violence.  This conference is judicially-focused and open to all those interested in the improvement of juvenile and family justice.  For registration and further info, please visit the NCJFCJ website here.  The early bird deadline to register ends on June 1.

81st Annual Conference

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform has released a request for applications for the 2018 School-Justice Partnerships and Diversion Pathways Certificate Program to be held Sept. 24 – 28, in Washington, D.C.  This program, held in partnership with the American Institutes for Research and the National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice, will provide an intensive, week-long training to help school and district staff, court professionals, law enforcement, and child serving leaders address the needs of youth involved in or at risk of entering the juvenile justice system.  The deadline for applications will be June 15.

 

Training

Registration is still open for the 2018 Southern Juvenile Defender Center Regional Summit.  The event will take place on June 8 and 9 at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  For further details and to register for the event, please check the Eventbrite page here.

The 2018 Defender Trial School, cosponsored by the School of Government and the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, will be held Monday, July 9, through Friday, July 13, at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.  The online registration deadline will be at 5 p.m. on Monday, June 25, and interested parties may register here.  Defender Trial School participants will use their own cases to develop a cohesive theory of defense at trial and apply that theory through all stages of trial, including voir dire, opening and closing arguments, and direct and cross-examination.  The program will offer approximately 30 hours of general CLE credit and qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit, but attendees must attend all sessions.  The Defender Trial School is open to public defenders and a limited number of private attorneys who perform a significant amount of appointed work.  The registration fee for privately assigned counsel will be $700, which includes materials, breaks, lunches and parking, however Valerie Pearce and Tucker Charns can provide info for those interested in fellowships.  For additional info, please check out the program webpage.

Registration is open for the N.C. Bar Association’s annual meeting, this year titled “The Future of Law”.   This event will be hosted at the Wilmington Convention Center from June 21 – 24.  Topics covered will include artificial intelligence, virtual reality, design thinking in the law, and the future of legal service delivery.  For further info and to register please check out the NCBA website and the event brochure.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favorite

Please save the dates for the 2018 Parent Attorney and Juvenile Defender Conferences.  Parent Attorney Conference will be held Thursday, August 16 and Juvenile Defender Conference will be held Friday, August 17. Both conferences, cosponsored by the School of Government and the Office of Indigent Defense Services, will be held at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus, offer approximately six hours of CLE credit, and feature speakers from across the state.  Registration will open in mid-June with a formal announcement and full details.

Thank you for checking out this week’s wrap-up.  We hope you have a safe and enjoyable Memorial Day weekend!

OJD Week in Review: May 7 – 11

Hello, juvenile justice warriors.  This week we’ve got a new job opportunity and a new webinar added to the list of reminders for upcoming event and application deadlines.

Training

Registration is still open for the 2018 Southern Juvenile Defender Center Regional Summit.  Today will be the last day the hotel room block for this event will remain open.  The event will take place on June 8 and 9 at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  For further details and to register for the event, please check the Eventbrite page here.

training toy story

The 2018 Defender Trial School, cosponsored by the School of Government and the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, will be held Monday, July 9, through Friday, July 13, at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.  The online registration deadline will be at 5 p.m. on Monday, June 25, and interested parties may register here.  Defender Trial School participants will use their own cases to develop a cohesive theory of defense at trial and apply that theory through all stages of trial, including voir dire, opening and closing arguments, and direct and cross-examination.  The program will offer approximately 30 hours of general CLE credit and qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit, but attendees must attend all sessions.  The Defender Trial School is open to public defenders and a limited number of private attorneys who perform a significant amount of appointed work.  The registration fee for privately assigned counsel will be $700, which includes materials, breaks, lunches and parking, however Valerie Pearce and Tucker Charns can provide info for those interested in fellowships.  For additional info, please check out the program webpage.

Registration is open for the N.C. Bar Association’s annual meeting, this year titled “The Future of Law”.   This event will be hosted at the Wilmington Convention Center from June 21 – 24.  Topics covered will include artificial intelligence, virtual reality, design thinking in the law, and the future of legal service delivery.  For further info and to register please check out the NCBA website and the event brochure.

New Resource

Earlier this week we added the Miller Strategy Handout to the “Trial Motions and Forms Index” section of our website’s “Materials for Defenders” tab.  We hope that this handout will provide additional info to benefit defenders representing juvenile clients in first-degree murder cases and any case transferred to superior court.

giphy-1

From Around the Community

You’re invited to join the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) as we celebrate the transformational power of stories; a power that honors the dignity and humanity of every child.  On Tuesday, May 15 (OJD Note: the 51st anniversary of the Gault decision), we’ll gather at the historic National Museum of Women in the Arts for The Story of Justice.  It is our great pleasure to announce that NJDC is recognizing both Carrie Johnson, justice correspondent at NPR, and DLA Piper LLP (US), with the inaugural Norman Dorsen Award, dedicated to the late professor and civil rights attorney who forever changed the landscape of children’s rights in the United States.  This award celebrates those like Mr. Dorsen who work outside of the children’s defense community and yet contribute so much to the fulfillment of equal protections for young people.  If you’re interested in supporting The Story of Justice as a sponsor, learn more here.

Also on May 15 at 1 p.m., the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators will host “LGBTQI Youth in Juvenile Justice Settings: Closing the Gap between Recommended Practice and Reality.”  In this webinar presenters will discuss improving the the safety of and reducing violence against LGBTQI youth in corrections and helping this population develop prosocial skills.  To register for this webinar, please check the link here.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Council of State Governments Justice Center will host the 2018 Janet Reno Forum on May 21 at  Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.  The forum will highlight strategies for restructuring juvenile justice systems to more effectively enhance public safety and improve outcomes for youth.  The event will include the presentation of the second annual Janet Reno Endowment Women’s Leadership Award, and attendees will receive a publication featuring the highlighted strategies.  Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders are invited to attend.  Please register here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network will be hosting its 2018 Forum in Durham, N.C. from July 16 – 18 at the Duke University School of Law (210 Science Dr, Durham, NC 27708).  This event, co-hosted by the Youth Justice Project of the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and Duke Children’s Law Clinic, is meant to be a fun networking and training setting for juvenile justice advocates.  July 16 and 17 will be open to NJJN members only, and the final day will be open to the public.  For details on travel assistance, the current agenda, and lodging, please visit their site here.

Registration is now open for the 81st Annual National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Conference.  The event this year will take place at the Hyatt Regency Denver at the Colorado Convention Center from July 22 – 25.  The conference will offer presentations/training tracks on  topics such as family law, juvenile justice, child welfare, and family violence.  This conference is judicially-focused and open to all those interested in the improvement of juvenile and family justice.  For registration and further info, please visit the NCJFCJ website here.  The early bird deadline to register ends on June 1.

81st Annual Conference

Job Opportunities

The Michigan State Appellate Defender Office (SADO) is seeking an Assistant Defender for its Juvenile Lifer Unit.  The Unit is composed of seven attorneys and four mitigation specialists representing over a hundred clients where prosecutors are again seeking life without parole sentences.  The ideal candidate will have experience in death penalty phase or juvenile lifer resentencing hearings, experience in both trial and appellate courts, and experience negotiating with prosecutors, preparing mitigation for clients, and working with expert witnesses.  The project is funded through October 2019 for now, but funding will likely continue as the work will not be complete by then.  To view the full job description and see how to apply please review the complete job posting here.

The Georgetown Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative (GJJI) is currently accepting applications for a Race and Justice Fellow, who will work with GJJI staff to improve the systems youth encounter through policy reform, and to develop resources to raise the level of practice among juvenile defenders across the county.  Applications will be accepted until May 14.  Please find the complete job description and application info here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

That is all for now.  Feel free to reach out to us via phone, the listserv, or email if you ever need assistance, and follow us on Twitter or even share on the NCOJD Facebook page if you feel so inclined.  Until next time, we bid everyone a safe and happy weekend!

OJD Week in Review: Apr. 30 – May 4

Happy Friday to all!  This week is once again only reminders, but please note the dates for the upcoming CLEs below as few will be taking place/closing special offers before the end of next week.

Training

On Thursday, May 10, the N.C. Bar Association will be hosting “Raise the Age: A New Era for Juvenile Justice in North Carolina” at the N.C. Bar Center in Cary, from 8:25 a.m. to 3 p.m.  This seminar promises to expand attendees’ understanding of the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act and its practical and ethical implications.  Attendees will receive 5.5 CLE credits total, with 1.0 CLE credit in Ethics/Professional Responsibility and 4.5 General CLE credits.  For further details about this event, please check the website here.

Registration is still open for the 2018 Southern Juvenile Defender Center Regional Summit.  Partial scholarship assistance will be offered to assist with lodging expenses until May 7 and the hotel room block will remain open until May 11.   The event will take place from June 8 – 9 at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  For further details and to register for the event, please check the Eventbrite page here.

yoda training

The 2018 Defender Trial School, cosponsored by the School of Government and the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, will be held Monday, July 9, through Friday, July 13, at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.  The online registration deadline will be at 5 p.m. on Monday, June 25, and interested parties may register here.  Defender Trial School participants will use their own cases to develop a cohesive theory of defense at trial and apply that theory through all stages of trial, including voir dire, opening and closing arguments, and direct and cross-examination.  The program will offer approximately 30 hours of general CLE credit and qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit, but attendees must attend all sessions.  The Defender Trial School is open to public defenders and a limited number of private attorneys who perform a significant amount of appointed work.  The registration fee for privately assigned counsel will be $700, which includes materials, breaks, lunches and parking, however Valerie Pearce and Tucker Charns can provide info for those interested in fellowships.  For additional info, please check out the program webpage.

Registration is now open for N.C. Bar Association’s annual meeting, this year titled “The Future of Law”.   This event will be hosted at the Wilmington Convention Center from June 21 – 24.  Topics covered will include artificial intelligence, virtual reality, design thinking in the law, and the future of legal service delivery.  For further info and to register please check out the NCBA website and the event brochure.

From Around the Community

 

You’re invited to join the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) as we celebrate the transformational power of stories; a power that honors the dignity and humanity of every child.  On Tuesday, May 15 (OJD Note: the 51st anniversary of the Gault decision), we’ll gather at the historic National Museum of Women in the Arts for The Story of Justice.  It is our great pleasure to announce that NJDC is recognizing both Carrie Johnson, justice correspondent at NPR, and DLA Piper LLP (US), with the inaugural Norman Dorsen Award, dedicated to the late professor and civil rights attorney who forever changed the landscape of children’s rights in the United States.  This award celebrates those like Mr. Dorsen who work outside of the children’s defense community and yet contribute so much to the fulfillment of equal protections for young people.  If you’re interested in supporting The Story of Justice as a sponsor, learn more here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network will be hosting its 2018 Forum in Durham, N.C. from July 16 – 18 at the Duke University School of Law (210 Science Dr, Durham, NC 27708).  This event, co-hosted by the Youth Justice Project of the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and Duke Children’s Law Clinic, is meant to be a fun networking and training setting for juvenile justice advocates.  July 16 and 17 will be open to NJJN members only, and the final day will be open to the public.  For details on travel assistance, the current agenda, and lodging, please visit their site here.

Registration is now open for the 81st Annual National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Conference.  The event this year will take place at the Hyatt Regency Denver at the Colorado Convention Center from July 22 – 25.  The conference will offer presentations/training tracks on  topics such as family law, juvenile justice, child welfare, and family violence.  This conference is judicially-focused and open to all those interested in the improvement of juvenile and family justice.  For registration and further info, please visit the NCJFCJ website here.

81st Annual Conference

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Council of State Governments Justice Center will host the 2018 Janet Reno Forum on May 21 at  Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.  The forum will highlight strategies for restructuring juvenile justice systems to more effectively enhance public safety and improve outcomes for youth.  The event will include the presentation of the second annual Janet Reno Endowment Women’s Leadership Award, and attendees will receive a publication featuring the highlighted strategies.  Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders are invited to attend.  Please register here.

Job Opportunities

The Georgetown Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative (GJJI) is currently accepting applications for a Race and Justice Fellow, who will work with GJJI staff to improve the systems youth encounter through policy reform, and to develop resources to raise the level of practice among juvenile defenders across the county.  Applications will be accepted until May 14.  Please find the complete job description and application info here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

This wraps up the week.  We will bring more updates in time and we wish you all a safe and happy Cinco de Mayo weekend.

OJD Week in Review: Apr. 23 – 27

Hello, N.C. and beyond!  This week we primarily have reminders for you for previously mentioned news with an update on Defender Trial School and school-Justice partnership news included.

From Around the Community

On Wednesday, Apr. 25, a day-long conversation about the intersection of school safety, juvenile justice, law enforcement, and the criminal justice system took place in Cary.  This workshop was sponsored by the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts  (NCAOC) and the Juvenile Justice Section of the Department of Public Safety.   During this workshop, juvenile justice, education and law enforcement officials, along with judges, district attorneys, public defenders and juvenile program providers, learned about school-justice partnerships (SJP) and  had the opportunity to see the reveal of NCAOC’s “School-Justice Partnership Implementation Toolkit.”  This resource contains guidance to assist judicial districts in developing individualized SJP agreements, which are an important component of the “Raise the Age” legislation, or the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act of 2017.  During the afternoon session, the spotlight was on school safety and included mental health intervention strategies and a panel on the role of school resource officers in North Carolina schools.   The SJP is a group of community stakeholders who work together to establish specific guidelines for school discipline in a way that minimizes suspensions, expulsions, and school-based referrals to court for minor misconduct.  The main goal of the SJP is to keep kids in school and out of court for routine misconduct at school.  SJPs are being developed throughout North Carolina as a result of the state’s recently enacted Raise the Age law.

School-Justice Partnership Pic

You’re invited to join the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) as we celebrate the transformational power of stories; a power that honors the dignity and humanity of every child.  On May 15, 2018 (OJD Note: the 51st anniversary of the Gault decision), we’ll gather at the historic National Museum of Women in the Arts for The Story of Justice.  It is our great pleasure to announce that NJDC is recognizing both Carrie Johnson, justice correspondent at NPR, and DLA Piper LLP (US), with the inaugural Norman Dorsen Award, dedicated to the late professor and civil rights attorney who forever changed the landscape of children’s rights in the United States.  This award celebrates those like Mr. Dorsen who work outside of the children’s defense community and yet contribute so much to the fulfillment of equal protections for young people.  If you’re interested in supporting The Story of Justice as a sponsor, learn more here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network will be hosting its 2018 Forum in Durham, N.C. from July 16 – 18 at the Duke University School of Law (210 Science Dr, Durham, NC 27708).  This event, co-hosted by the Youth Justice Project of the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and Duke Children’s Law Clinic, is meant to be a fun networking and training setting for juvenile justice advocates.  July 16 and 17 will be open to NJJN members only, and the final day will be open to the public.  For details on travel assistance, the current agenda, and lodging, please visit their site here.

Registration is now open for the 81st Annual National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Conference.  The event this year will take place at the Hyatt Regency Denver at the Colorado Convention Center from July 22 – 25.  The conference will offer presentations/training tracks on  topics such as family law, juvenile justice, child welfare, and family violence.  This conference is judicially-focused and open to all those interested in the improvement of juvenile and family justice.  For registration and further info, please visit the NCJFCJ website here.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Council of State Governments Justice Center will host the 2018 Janet Reno Forum on May 21 at  Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.  The forum will highlight strategies for restructuring juvenile justice systems to more effectively enhance public safety and improve outcomes for youth.  The event will include the presentation of the second annual Janet Reno Endowment Women’s Leadership Award, and attendees will receive a publication featuring the highlighted strategies.  Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders are invited to attend.  Please register here.

Training

New details have been provided for the 2018 Defender Trial School.  This event, cosponsored by the School of Government and the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, will be held Monday, July 9, through Friday, July 13, at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.  The online registration deadline will be at 5 p.m. on Monday, June 25, and interested parties may register here.  Defender Trial School participants will use their own cases to develop a cohesive theory of defense at trial and apply that theory through all stages of trial, including voir dire, opening and closing arguments, and direct and cross-examination.  The program will offer approximately 30 hours of general CLE credit and qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit, but attendees must attend all sessions.  The Defender Trial School is open to public defenders and a limited number of private attorneys who perform a significant amount of appointed work.  The registration fee for privately assigned counsel will be $700, which includes materials, breaks, lunches and parking, however Valerie Pearce and Tucker Charns can provide info for those interested in fellowships.  For additional info, please check out the program webpage.

every-day-is-training-day

Registration is now open for the 2018 Southern Juvenile Defender Center Regional Summit.  The event will take place from June 8 – 9 at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  Partial scholarship assistance will be offered to assist with lodging expenses until May 7 and the hotel room block will remain open until May 11.   For further details and to register for the event, please check the Eventbrite page here.

Registration is now open for N.C. Bar Association’s annual meeting, this year titled “The Future of Law”.   This event will be hosted at the Wilmington Convention Center from June 21 – 24.  For those who register before May 1, a President’s Luncheon ticket and 6.0 CLE credit hours will be included with the registration price.  Topics covered will include artificial intelligence, virtual reality, design thinking in the law, and the future of legal service delivery.  For further info and to register please check out the NCBA website and the event brochure.

On May 10, the N.C. Bar Association will be hosting “Raise the Age: A New Era for Juvenile Justice in North Carolina” at the N.C. Bar Center in Cary, from 8:25 a.m. to 3 p.m.  This seminar promises to expand attendees’ understanding of the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act and its practical and ethical implications.  Attendees will receive 5.5 CLE credits total, with 1.0 CLE credit in Ethics/Professional Responsibility and 4.5 General CLE credits.  For further details about this event, please check the website here.

Job Opportunities

too-awesome-meme-e1495332925779

The Georgetown Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative (GJJI) is currently accepting applications for a Race and Justice Fellow, who will work with GJJI staff to improve the systems youth encounter through policy reform, and to develop resources to raise the level of practice among juvenile defenders across the county.  Applications will be accepted until May 14.  Please find the complete job description and application info here.

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) will close applications for its staff attorney position on Monday, Apr. 30.  The ideal candidate will have 2-4 years of experience, love writing, research, and critical thinking, and have a passion for advancing improvements in juvenile defense policy and practice.  To read more about this position and how to apply, please check out the post here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

This wraps up the week.  Please be sure to check out all of the upcoming training events and save the dates to get your CLE requirements knocked out faster!   We will bring more updates in time and we wish you all a safe and happy weekend.

OJD Week in Review: Apr. 16-20

Welcome back!  We’ve got a few new events, training, and job opportunities ahead this time around.  Please read through and be sure to check out the linked pages too so that you don’t miss out.

From Around the Community

Registration is now open for the 2018 Southern Juvenile Defender Center Regional Summit.  The event will take place from June 8 – 9 at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  Partial scholarship assistance will be offered to assist with lodging expenses until May 7 and the hotel room block will remain open until May 11.   For further details and to register for the event, please check the Eventbrite page here.

You’re invited to join the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) as we celebrate the transformational power of stories; a power that honors the dignity and humanity of every child.  On May 15, 2018 (OJD Note: the 51st anniversary of the Gault decision), we’ll gather at the historic National Museum of Women in the Arts for The Story of Justice.  It is our great pleasure to announce that NJDC is recognizing both Carrie Johnson, justice correspondent at NPR, and DLA Piper LLP (US), with the inaugural Norman Dorsen Award, dedicated to the late professor and civil rights attorney who forever changed the landscape of children’s rights in the United States.  This award celebrates those like Mr. Dorsen who work outside of the children’s defense community and yet contribute so much to the fulfillment of equal protections for young people.  If you’re interested in supporting The Story of Justice as a sponsor, learn more here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network will be hosting its 2018 Forum in Durham, N.C. from July 16 – 18 at the Duke University School of Law (210 Science Dr, Durham, NC 27708).  This event, co-hosted by the Youth Justice Project of the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and Duke Children’s Law Clinic, is meant to be a fun networking and training setting for juvenile justice advocates.  July 16 and 17 will be open to NJJN members only, and the final day will be open to the public.  For details on travel assistance, the current agenda, and lodging, please visit their site here.

IMG_2449

Registration is now open for the 81st Annual National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Conference.  The event this year will take place at the Hyatt Regency Denver at the Colorado Convention Center from July 22 – 25.  The conference will offer presentations/training tracks on  topics such as family law, juvenile justice, child welfare, and family violence.  This conference is judicially-focused and open to all those interested in the improvement of juvenile and family justice.  For registration and further info, please visit the NCJFCJ website here.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Council of State Governments Justice Center will host the 2018 Janet Reno Forum on May 21 at  Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.  The forum will highlight strategies for restructuring juvenile justice systems to more effectively enhance public safety and improve outcomes for youth.  The event will include the presentation of the second annual Janet Reno Endowment Women’s Leadership Award, and attendees will receive a publication featuring the highlighted strategies.  Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders are invited to attend.  Please register here.

Training

Registration is now open for N.C. Bar Association’s annual meeting, this year titled “The Future of Law”.   This event will be hosted at the Wilmington Convention Center from June 21 – 24.  For those who register before May 1, a President’s Luncheon ticket and 6.0 CLE credit hours will be included with the registration price.  Topics covered will include artificial intelligence, virtual reality, design thinking in the law, and the future of legal service delivery.  For further info and to register please check out the NCBA website and the event brochure.

RTA

On May 10, the N.C. Bar Association will be hosting “Raise the Age: A New Era for Juvenile Justice in North Carolina” at the N.C. Bar Center in Cary, from 8:25 a.m. to 3 p.m.  This seminar promises to expand attendees’ understanding of the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act and its practical and ethical implications.  Attendees will receive 5.5 CLE credits total, with 1.0 CLE credit in Ethics/Professional Responsibility and 4.5 General CLE credits.  For further details about this event, please check the website here.

We hope you saved the date!  It was recently announced that the 2018 Defender Trial School, cosponsored by the School of Government and the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, will be held Monday, July 9 through Friday, July 13, 2018, at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.  Defender Trial School participants will use their own cases to develop a cohesive theory of defense at trial and apply that theory through all stages of trial, including voir dire, opening and closing arguments, and direct and cross-examination.  The program will offer approximately 30 hours of general CLE credit and qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit.  The Defender Trial School is open to public defenders and a limited number of private attorneys who perform a significant amount of appointed work.  Further details will be provided on the course page in the near future.  Any questions or requests for additional info should be directed to Tanya Jisa at jisa@sog.unc.edu / 919.843.8981 or Professor John Rubin at rubin@sog.unc.edu/ 919.962.2498.

23777394-Save-the-date-grunge-rubber-stamp-on-white-vector-illustration-Stock-Vector

Job Opportunities

 

The Georgetown Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative (GJJI) is currently accepting applications for a Race and Justice Fellow, who will work with GJJI staff to improve the systems youth encounter through policy reform, and to develop resources to raise the level of practice among juvenile defenders across the county.  Applications will be accepted until May 14.  Please find the complete job description and application info here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) is still accepting applications for its 2018-19 Youth Justice Leadership Institute.  This is an annual year-long fellowship program that selects 10 people of color working as professionals in the juvenile justice field to participate in a curriculum to develop their leadership and advocacy skills.  The fellowship can be completed with the fellows’ current employment, so those selected will not have to leave their jobs to participate in the Institute.  The fellowship will include two fully financed retreats, mentoring and frequent distance learning opportunities.  Applications for the Institute (found here) must be submitted by Monday, Apr. 23.

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is currently seeking a staff attorney.  The ideal candidate will have 2-4 years of experience, love writing, research, and critical thinking, and have a passion for advancing improvements in juvenile defense policy and practice.  This position will remain open until April 30.  To read more about this position and how to apply, please check out the post here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

This wraps up the week.  Please let contact us if you have any questions or concerns.  Our office is making it part of our mission this year to disseminate more info and clarify anything related to Raise the Age prior to the legislation going into full effect next year.  If there is anything else we could be of further assistance in, please reach out and let us know!