Registration is Now Open for the 2019 SJDC Regional Summit

The Southern Juvenile Defender Center (SJDC) proudly announces the ninth annual Regional Summit, taking place in New Orleans, Louisiana, June 7-8, 2019.  You’re invited to come together with your colleagues from across the Southern states to participate in this one-of-a-kind programIf interested in attending, please register here for the Summit before May 13.

For out-of-state attorneys, partial scholarship assistance is available to cover lodging expenses on first-come, first-served basis.  Scholarship recipients must be willing to share a two-bed hotel room with another attendee and to pay $25 per night toward the cost of the room.  To inquire about a scholarship, contact Randee J. Waldman and Richard Pittman.  The deadline for scholarship applications is May 9th.

A block of rooms has been reserved at the Holiday Inn New Orleans Downtown Superdome located at 330 Loyola Ave. at a special group rate of $139/night plus tax.  To book a room at the group rate, contact the hotel at 1-800-238-0227 with group code SNJ, or book directly at Southern National Juvenile Defender Center.  The group rate is available for stays up to 3 days before and 3 days after the Summit.

A major credit card must be provided to guarantee your reservation.  A 24-hour cancellation notice is required to avoid a penalty.  To guarantee the group rate, you must reserve your room by Monday, May 13th.  Free parking is included for up to one car per room.  Parking rates are an additional $30/day for additional vehicles.

Note: There is no charge for registration, but failure to cancel your registration for the SJDC Regional Summit by May 25 will result in a $100.00 fee payable to SJDC.

CLE credits have been applied for.  You will be responsible for paying for your own CLE credits directly to the bar.

The agenda will include sessions on “Efforts and Approaches to Juvenile Detention and Bail Reform”, “Walking In Your Clients Shoes: An Immersive Experience Into The Life of A System Involved Youth”, “Keeping Children Out of Adult Court”, “Ethical Considerations in Alternative Courts” and a JTIP session on “Representing Youth on Probation”.

*No DOJ funds will be used for food or beverage.

SJDC Regional Summit 2019 Save the Date1

Save the Date: N.C. Bar Association’s Groundwater Training on Racial Equity

The North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA) Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights, Education Law, Criminal Justice Sections, and Minorities in the Profession Committee are proud to present the Racial Equity Institute’s (REI) “Groundwater Presentation: An Introduction to Racial Equity”!  This free event will take place on May 9 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Bar Center (8000 Weston Parkway).  More information and a link for registration will be available soon, but if you have any questions about the event, please contact Andi Bradford.  (Please note that while the event is free for everyone to attend, no more than 175 attendees will be permitted, so please register early!)

REI hosts trainings locally and nationally to help participants develop tools to understand and challenge patterns of racial inequity and to grow equity within their organizations and communities.  REI’s Groundwater Training is a  lively, participatory, and evidence-based  introductory session in which trainers  review stories and data to examine characteristics of modern-day racial inequity, and actively engage participants in analyzing the impact of systemic and institutional racism in our society in areas such as education, healthcare, juvenile justice, criminal justice and child welfare.

This research-based presentation focuses on the following six points that are essential to understanding the realities of systemic racism as a predictor of outcomes in all institutions.

  1. Racial inequity looks the same across systems.
  2. Socio-economic difference does not explain the racial inequity.
  3. Systems contribute significantly to disparities.
  4. The systems-level disparities cannot be explained by a few ‘bad apples’ or ill-intentioned gatekeepers.
  5. Poor outcomes are concentrated in certain geographic communities; usually poor communities and communities of color.
  6. An analysis that includes race often draws starkly different conclusions than one that does not.

NCBA members who have attended this training describe it as transformative as well as fundamental to an attorney’s ethical responsibility to “seek improvement of the law, access to the legal system, the administration of justice and the quality of service rendered by the legal profession.” (NC Rules of Professional Conduct, .01 Preamble)

OJD Week in Review: Oct. 1 – 5

Happy First Friday!  This week, as far as news, we’ve got one new job opportunity added.

We also want to mention that we are still updating our Case Summaries list.  Most recently, we’ve added the published delinquency opinion for In re J.B., which deals with self-incrimination.  We do want to apologize for any issues with the links to the PDF versions of the opinions.  The addresses still work when copied into a browser, but we are aware that the hyperlink within the document gives an error message.  We apologize for that inconvenience, and we are still seeking solutions around it.

Job Opportunities

The Council for Children’s Rights is seeking to hire a full-time juvenile defense attorney for its Children’s Defense Team.  The juvenile defense attorney will primarily represent children in the Mecklenburg County Juvenile Court.  To apply, please submit a resume and cover letter here by Oct. 16.

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The Lousiana Center for Children’s Rights (LCCR) is currently accepting applications for a Miller staff attorney, a regional mitigation specialist, and a Miller mitigation supervisor.

Training

On Oct. 18, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., the North Carolina Advocates for Justice Juvenile Defense Section in collaboration with the Office of the Juvenile Defender will be hosting a CLE in Asheville, N.C. at the Lexington Brewery.  This CLE will have presentations from IDS Regional Defender Valerie Pearce, discussing the ethical obligations to representing youth following the full implementation of Raise the Age, and Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes, discussing strategies for utilizing resources and advocating for the best results for clients to set them up for success.  One CLE credit hour in ethics and one general  CLE credit hour for this course are currently pending with the Bar.  A sidebar social will also be held at the same location at 5:30 p.m.  You do not need to be a member of NCAJ to attend this CLE.  Everyone can attend for free and pay their CLE credit fees directly to the Bar.  To RSVP, please contact Valerie Pearce by email here or call 919-667-3369.

On Nov. 16, the UNC School of Government will be hosting a Back to School CLE from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.  The training offers 6.25 hours of CLE credit, including an hour of ethics and an optional hour of substance abuse credit.  Topics will include civil and criminal case law and legislative updates, the opioid epidemic, and a review and preview of the U.S. Supreme Court.  Registration will be $300 and the deadline to register will be Oct. 31.  Lunch will be provided.  To register please visit the UNC SOG site here.

That is all there is for this week.  Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!

OJD Week in Review: Sept. 3 – 7

Hello, all!  It’s been a slightly shorter week and we are still short on general news, but below we have just a couple of things to share with the juvenile defense community.

New Resource

The Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) has recently added a new section called “Voices of Public Defense”.  This new section will feature IDS’ public defense materials.  The current content includes a series of segments from a presentation by Christine Mumma about the importance of public defense in protecting the innocent and the IDS Commission’s “Committed to Fairness” video.  Feel free to check out the new section here.

Training

On Nov. 16, the UNC School of Government will be hosting a Back to School CLE from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.  The training offers 6.25 hours of CLE credit, including an hour of ethics and an optional hour of substance abuse credit.  Topics will include civil and criminal case law and legislative updates, the opioid epidemic, and a review and preview of the U.S. Supreme Court.  Registration will be $300.  Lunch will be provided.  To register please visit the UNC SOG site here.

This wraps up another light news week.  As more public events and other opportunities arise, we will be sure to share.  In the meantime, feel free to contact our office by phone or email, and check out our Facebook and Twitter pages for other useful articles/insights!

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OJD Week in Review: Aug. 27 – 31

Happy Labor Day Weekend!  The news is actually getting slower at the moment but here is something  the juvenile defender community may be interested in…

Raise the Age

On Friday, Aug. 24, the Juvenile Jurisdiction Advisory Committee met and the Division of Adult Correction and Juvenile Justice offered new updates on the implementation plan for Raise the Age.  If you are interested in what was discussed, please check out the material here.

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Training

On Nov. 16, the UNC School of Government will be hosting a Back to School CLE from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.  The training offers 6.25 hours of CLE credit, including an hour of ethics and an optional hour of substance abuse credit.  Topics will include civil and criminal case law and legislative updates, the opioid epidemic, and a review and preview of the U.S. Supreme Court.  Registration will be $300.  Lunch will be provided.  To register please visit the UNC SOG site here.

That is it…  Have a safe and exciting Labor Day weekend!

OJD Week in Review: Aug. 20 – 24

Happy Friday!  This another very light week, but we’ve got some new resources added and the same reminders for training registration deadlines that are approaching fast!

New Resource

There are three new resources added to the “Materials for Defenders” page.  Under the “Adolescent Brain Development” section, we’ve posted Dr. Cindy Cottle’s presentation from the Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder training titled Moving Forward: Advanced Concepts in Adolescent Brain Development.  Under the “Confessions” section, we’ve added the Juvenile Training Immersion Program’s Summary of Reid Interrogation Techniques.  Under the “Dispositions” section, you can now find Veronika Monteleone’s Disposition Worksheet.  All of these resources and more can be found here.

Training

Registration for the 2018 Misdemeanor Defender Training will at close 5 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 30There will be no onsite registration.  The training will take place at the UNC-Chapel Hill campus from Sept. 18 – 21.  This event, cosponsored by the Office of Indigent Defense Services and the School of Government, will be an introductory program for attorneys who are new to handling misdemeanor cases and will offer 21.5 CLE credit hours, including one hour of ethics/professional responsibility credit and qualifies for criminal law specialization credit.  Attendees can expect sessions that will cover topics such as impaired driving, probation violations, ethical issues in district court, and much more.  The deadline for the hotel block will be Tuesday, Aug. 28.  The fee for privately assigned counsel will be $560, but the program will be free for IDS state employees.  There is a new online registration system being used that will require first-time users to create an account, but if any issues should arise, please contact registration@sog.unc.edu/919.966.4414 or check the FAQ page.  For further questions contact either Tanya Jisa or Phil Dixon,Jr.

Save the Date!  The Bridging The Gap III Seminar will be in Winston-Salem September 20-21, 2018.  Participants in this seminar will be awarded 10.25 CLE credit hours, including 1.5 credit hours in ethics, professional responsibility and professionalism.  The registration fee is $115.00.  The focus of this seminar will be on client and family relations, and pretrial resolution.  Registration and hotel information will be published in early July.  A block of 40 rooms will be available once the registration is published.  For an attorney to attend he or she must have at least 7 years’ experience.  The “ gap” in Bridging The Gap describes lawyers who have never taken murder cases and are considering taking them on, and lawyers who have taken non-capital murder cases and are considering taking capital cases.  The seminar, hosted by the Office of the Capital Defender, focuses on issues relevant to both non-capital and capital murder cases.  If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Terry Alford.

That sums it up for this week!  Have a great weekend, and hopefully there is more to come next week!

OJD Week in Review: Aug. 13 – 17

Welcome back, everyone!  There is light news this week, but there are a few tidbits of information that might be of interest to you below.

Another OJD Spotlight On…

Before we get to the usual news, we would like to bring attention to a young man from Garner who wrote to our office recently with a personal request regarding school safety.  Lance Murphy, 16, of Garner Magnet High School, wrote Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry citing his concerns with the recent tragedies that have taken place within schools, including the one in Parkland, Fla.  In his writing, Murphy cites data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics and inquires about programs to aid at-risk youth, before concluding with the statement below:

“As North Carolina’s Juvenile Defender, I ask that you support programs that help rehabilitate juvenile offenders.  I also ask that you support programs that may help prevent at-risk youth from committing crimes to begin with.  Examples of this could include after-school care, community support groups, community sport leagues, community service, and job skills support.  All children should have an opportunity to become outstanding adults, even those who have made bad choices in the past.  I thank you for your service and time.  I anxiously await your reply.”

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While Zogry has sent his own reply to Murphy, perhaps we should also consider his heartfelt request as a call to action for all juvenile justice advocates and service providers.  It’s great that kids such as Murphy are considering preventative measures to keep more youth out of the justice system and addressing the fact that all kids, regardless of their actions, deserve the chance to prove themselves to be better adults.  We commend Murphy for speaking out on behalf of his peers and we also want to thank all those people who have actively worked to improve our communities and protect the future of our youth!

From Around the Community

cropped-whiteojd.pngOn Wednesday, Aug. 22, from 12 to 2 p.m., the Office of the Juvenile Defender will be hosting a Raise the Age Regional Informational Meeting in the Law Library of the Watauga County Courthouse (842 W. King Street) in Boone.  Juvenile defenders in District 24 and its surrounding districts are encouraged to attend.  During this meeting we will be discussing the Raise the Age law, OJD’s plans in response to the law, and what issues should be addressed going forward.  We encourage attendees to bring their lunch, as well as questions, comments and concerns.  We have a few other similar information meetings planned in other parts of the state, but if attorneys are interested in receiving more information, please feel free to reach out to our office and we will be happy to schedule a meeting/training with you!

On Thursday, Aug. 23, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., the OJJDP-funded Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program will host the “Internet Crimes Against Children/KeepSafe Incident Response Tool for Schools” webinar.  The webinar will discuss a free resource designed to help schools respond to technology-related incidents, including cyberbullying, sexting, hacking, and threats of violence.  The webinar will also identify how school officials can use this tool to work with law enforcement and other stakeholders to investigate and develop responses to all types of technology-related incidents.  If you are interested, please register here.

Training

Registration is now open for the 2018 Misdemeanor Defender Training, which will take place at the UNC-Chapel Hill campus from Sept. 18 – 21.  This training, cosponsored by the Office of Indigent Defense Services and the School of Government, will be an introductory program for attorneys who are new to handling misdemeanor cases and will offer 21.5 CLE credit hours, including one hour of ethics/professional responsibility credit and qualifies for criminal law specialization credit.  Attendees can expect sessions that will cover topics such as impaired driving, probation violations, ethical issues in district court, and much more.  The registration deadline will be 5 p.m. on Aug. 30 and the deadline for the hotel block will be Aug. 28.  There will be no onsite registration.  The fee for privately assigned counsel will be $560, but the program will be free for IDS state employees.  There is a new online registration system being used that will require first-time users to create an account, but if any issues should arise, please contact registration@sog.unc.edu/919.966.4414 or check the FAQ page.  For further questions contact either Tanya Jisa or Phil Dixon,Jr.

Save the Date!  The Bridging The Gap III Seminar will be in Winston-Salem September 20-21, 2018.  Participants in this seminar will be awarded 10.25 CLE credit hours, including 1.5 credit hours in ethics, professional responsibility and professionalism.  The registration fee is $115.00.  The focus of this seminar will be on client and family relations, and pretrial resolution.  Registration and hotel information will be published in early July.  A block of 40 rooms will be available once the registration is published.  For an attorney to attend he or she must have at least 7 years’ experience.  The “ gap” in Bridging The Gap describes lawyers who have never taken murder cases and are considering taking them on, and lawyers who have taken non-capital murder cases and are considering taking capital cases.  The seminar, hosted by the Office of the Capital Defender, focuses on issues relevant to both non-capital and capital murder cases.  If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Terry Alford.

That sums it up for this week!  The near-future for news in the juvenile defense community is looking good, so check back soon!