Job Opportunity: NCCRED Seeks a New Executive Director

The North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Criminal Justice System (NCCRED) has an opening for a new Executive Director.

NCCRED

The Executive Director will provide leadership and manage all aspects of the organization including, but not limited to, coordinating and filing reports, developing relationships with potential partners, promoting and developing research on racial disparities, and supervising interns and contract staff.  The ideal candidate will have a passion for racial justice, experience in criminal justice reform and all aspects of nonprofit organizational management, excellent communication skills and comfort with managing conflict.

Please find the full job description here.  To apply please submit resume, cover letter, and salary requirements to James E. Williams, Jr., by June 1, 2019.  Please include email subject line “NCCRED Director Position.”

NCCRED is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that works across professional, political and ideological lines to identify, document and reduce racial disparities in North Carolina’s criminal justice system.  NCCRED brings together a diverse group of criminal justice leaders who share a commitment to building a more equitable, effective and humane criminal justice system in North Carolina.  Represented on the Commission are members of the Judiciary (Court of Appeals, Superior Court and District Court Judges), law enforcement professionals (Chiefs of Police and Department of Corrections), District Attorneys, Public Defenders, community advocates and scholars.  The Commission provides a forum for open dialogue, collective problem solving, information sharing and educating Commissioners on the most important developments in racially equitable criminal justice reform in North Carolina and across the nation.

NC-CRED is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, gender identity, age, disability, or gender.  NC-CRED will consider applications for both part-time and full-time employment.

 

Save the Date: N.C. Bar Association’s Groundwater Training on Racial Equity

The North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA) Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights, Education Law, Criminal Justice Sections, and Minorities in the Profession Committee are proud to present the Racial Equity Institute’s (REI) “Groundwater Presentation: An Introduction to Racial Equity”!  This free event will take place on May 9 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Bar Center (8000 Weston Parkway).  More information and a link for registration will be available soon, but if you have any questions about the event, please contact Andi Bradford.  (Please note that while the event is free for everyone to attend, no more than 175 attendees will be permitted, so please register early!)

REI hosts trainings locally and nationally to help participants develop tools to understand and challenge patterns of racial inequity and to grow equity within their organizations and communities.  REI’s Groundwater Training is a  lively, participatory, and evidence-based  introductory session in which trainers  review stories and data to examine characteristics of modern-day racial inequity, and actively engage participants in analyzing the impact of systemic and institutional racism in our society in areas such as education, healthcare, juvenile justice, criminal justice and child welfare.

This research-based presentation focuses on the following six points that are essential to understanding the realities of systemic racism as a predictor of outcomes in all institutions.

  1. Racial inequity looks the same across systems.
  2. Socio-economic difference does not explain the racial inequity.
  3. Systems contribute significantly to disparities.
  4. The systems-level disparities cannot be explained by a few ‘bad apples’ or ill-intentioned gatekeepers.
  5. Poor outcomes are concentrated in certain geographic communities; usually poor communities and communities of color.
  6. An analysis that includes race often draws starkly different conclusions than one that does not.

NCBA members who have attended this training describe it as transformative as well as fundamental to an attorney’s ethical responsibility to “seek improvement of the law, access to the legal system, the administration of justice and the quality of service rendered by the legal profession.” (NC Rules of Professional Conduct, .01 Preamble)

OJD Week in Review: Feb. 4 – 8

Salutations and thank you for joining us again!  This week, in addition to the invaluable Tip of the Week and necessary reminders, we’ve got a new job posting.  Also, please note that many deadlines job applications and event dates are approaching within the next week!

Tip of the Week – Calculations Matter

Make sure you calculate your client’s delinquency history correctly.  It is reversible error if you do not advise your client of the most serious disposition s/he is exposed to (even if everyone agrees to a lower dispositional level).  Feel free to use the disposition chart and prior record scoring sheet available here on our website.

delinquency calculation

From Around the Community

On Monday, Feb. 11, at 12:30 p.m., Duke Law School Professor Brandon L. Garrett and the Duke Criminal Law Society will be presenting and releasing their newest study, “Juvenile Life Without Parole in North Carolina”.  Garrett was awarded a grant from the Charles Koch Foundation to study evidence to inform criminal justice policy.  Through his research, Garrett prepared a report and will be sharing his findings with all attorneys working on juvenile cases at this event.  For further information, please direct questions to Callie Thomas.

Job Opportunities

National Center for State Courts (NCSC) is currently looking to fill a position for a Principal Court Management Consultant that would be based in one of NCSC’s offices (Denver, CO; Arlington, VA, or HQ in Williamsburg, VA), or possibly teleworking when not traveling.  NCSC is expanding its staff devoted to family and children’s issues and is hoping to get candidates with juvenile justice experience for this position.  To apply and see more details about this position, please check here.  The deadline for applications will be Friday, Feb. 15.

The deadline for electronic offers for the Office of Indigent Defense Services‘ Request for Proposals in Caswell, Person, Alamance, Orange, and Chatham counties will be Friday, Feb. 15.  The current contracts for adult noncapital criminal cases at the trial level and per session court cases in those districts will expire on May 31 and renew on June 1.  The RFP (RFP #16-0002R) seeks services for adult noncapital criminal cases at the trial level, juvenile delinquency, abuse/neglect/dependency and termination of parental rights, and treatment courts.  Please note that the RFP will not seek offers for potentially capital cases at the trial level, direct appeals or post-conviction cases.  Also, the juvenile delinquency RFP will only include Caswell, Alamance, and Person counties.  To access the RFP, please check here.

Training

On March 15, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., the UNC School of Government (SOG) will be hosting the first North Carolina Criminal Justice Summit in the the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Club.  The Summit will be lead by SOG’s own Professor of Public Law and Government Jessica Smith and will feature national and state experts with broad-ranging ideological perspectives who will discuss key issues capturing attention in North Carolina and around the nation, including bail reform, overcriminalization, and barriers to re-entry, such as fines and fees, the criminal record, and collateral consequences.  Join the conversation as they explore how these issues impact justice, public safety and economic prosperity in North Carolina, and whether there is common ground to address them.  This event will be free to attend, lunch will be provided, and it offers 5 hours of CJE and free CLE credit.  Attendees are responsible for their travel expenses, including a $14 event parking fee.  For those arriving the night before, state rate and discounted rooms at local hotels will be available.  To apply for this course and find more details, please visit here.  Applicants will be notified regarding acceptance no later than Friday, Feb. 15th.

The Office of the Juvenile Defender will be hosting a Juvenile Court Basics CLE on Feb. 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Cumberland County Courthouse.  Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes will be discussing the role of counsel, how to communicate with juvenile clients, dispositions, capacity, appeals, and so much more.  Questions and concerns are welcome.  Three general CLE credit hours are currently pending for this training.   Please contact Marcus Thompson by email or call 919-890-1650 if you have questions.

Save the date!  The 2019 Regional Training for Indigent Defense: Special Issues in Complex Felony Cases will be held on March 21 at the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C.  The training will focus on topics relevant to criminal law practitioners and is open to IDS contract attorneys and privately assigned counsel.  Participants will receive three general CLE credit hours.  Registration should open later this month.

every-day-is-training-day

That wraps up this week.  There should be more to come next Friday, but in the meantime, check out OJD’s Twitter and Facebook for posts throughout the week.

OJD Week in Review: Jan. 29 – Feb. 1

Happy first Friday and welcome to February!  Of course, this week there is a new tip, but we’ve also got another JJAC report, a new resource, and some new training announcements to share.

welcome

Tip of the Week – When Should I Receive the Disposition Report?

You should try to receive the disposition report prior to the dispositional hearing to review with your client.  If possible, try to get a copy of the report at least several days prior to the hearing.  While there is no statutory authority compelling the receipt from the intake counselor, there are local rules which suggest time periods.

JJAC Updates

The Juvenile Jurisdiction Advisory Committee (JJAC) has released its 2017 Annual Report.  This report features accomplishments of JJAC, data on the JCPC services, juvenile court services, juvenile facility populations,  education and clinical services, and more.  You can read the full report here.

Training

On March 15, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., the UNC School of Government (SOG) will be hosting the first North Carolina Criminal Justice Summit in the the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Carolina Club.  The Summit will be lead by SOG’s own Professor of Public Law and Government Jessica Smith and will feature national and state experts with broad-ranging ideological perspectives who will discuss key issues capturing attention in North Carolina and around the nation, including bail reform, overcriminalization, and barriers to re-entry, such as fines and fees, the criminal record, and collateral consequences.  Join the conversation as they explore how these issues impact justice, public safety and economic prosperity in North Carolina, and whether there is common ground to address them.  This event will be free to attend, lunch will be provided, and it offers 5 hours of CJE and free CLE credit.  Attendees are responsible for their travel expenses, including a $14 event parking fee.  For those arriving the night before, state rate and discounted rooms at local hotels will be available.  To apply for this course and find more details, please visit here.  Applicants will be notified regarding acceptance no later than February 15th.

wvpviw

The Office of the Juvenile Defender will be hosting a Juvenile Court Basics CLE on Feb. 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Cumberland County Courthouse.  Assistant Juvenile Defender Kim Howes will be discussing the role of counsel, how to communicate with juvenile clients, dispositions, capacity, appeals, and so much more.  Questions and concerns are welcome.  Three general CLE credit hours are currently pending for this training.   Please contact Marcus Thompson by email or call 919-890-1650 if you have questions.

Save the date!  The 2019 Regional Training for Indigent Defense: Special Issues in Complex Felony Cases will be held on March 21 at the East Carolina Heart Institute at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C.  The training will focus on topics relevant to criminal law practitioners and is open to IDS contract attorneys and privately assigned counsel.  Participants will receive three general CLE credit hours.  Registration should open later this month.

New Resource

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is delighted to share the updated 2018-2019 version of their Juvenile Defense Policy and Practice Career Resource Guide, which is intended to help law students prepare for a career in juvenile defense or juvenile justice policy reform.  Many law students, even those who are interested in criminal law, are not aware that juvenile defense, as a specialized practice, is a viable career option, and one that draws on many of the same motivations and skills as criminal defense.  Those students who are aware of juvenile defense have told NJDC they find it difficult to prepare for the job search in this field.  To that end, NDJC created this Career Resource Guide, which they hope will raise the profile of and help students prepare for a career in juvenile defense or juvenile justice policy reform.  The Guide includes information on coursework and externships that will help strengthen a candidate’s application in the juvenile defense field; resources to guide in the search for juvenile defense jobs, fellowships, and funding opportunities; and a list of offices around the country that provide employment and internship opportunities specific to juvenile defense.

From Around the Community

On Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m., Duke Law School Professor Brandon L. Garrett and the Duke Criminal Law Society will be presenting and releasing their newest study, “Juvenile Life Without Parole in North Carolina”.  Garrett was awarded a grant from the Charles Koch Foundation to study evidence to inform criminal justice policy.  Through his research, Garrett prepared a report and will be sharing his findings with all attorneys working on juvenile cases at this event.  For further information, please direct questions to Callie Thomas.

Job Opportunities

On Dec. 1, Indigent Defense Services issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) in Caswell, Person, Alamance, Orange, and Chatham counties.  The current contracts for adult noncapital criminal cases at the trial level and per session court cases in those districts will expire on May 31 and renew on June 1.  The RFP (RFP #16-0002R) seeks services for adult noncapital criminal cases at the trial level, juvenile delinquency, abuse/neglect/dependency and termination of parental rights, and treatment courts.  Please note that the RFP will not seek offers for potentially capital cases at the trial level, direct appeals or post-conviction cases.  Also, the juvenile delinquency RFP will only include Caswell, Alamance, and Person counties.  The deadline for electronic offers is Feb. 15.  To access the RFP, please check here.

This is it for this week.  There should be more to come next Friday, but in the meantime, check out OJD’s Twitter and Facebook for posts throughout the week.

OJD Week in Review: Feb. 5-9

This week there are some great opportunities for work, training and community building in juvenile defense.

Job Post Reminder and a Nice Little Feature

We want to remind everyone that the North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) will be closing applications for its executive director position on Feb. 15.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

NCCRED

If you haven’t already heard, the UNC School of Government recently added a post promoting the General Counsel Office of the Administrative Office of the Courts.  This post is a Q&A with LaToya Powell, former law professor of UNC and the new assistant legal counsel for the Office of General Counsel, working primarily in juvenile justice.  In the article, written by Austine Long, Powell discusses challenges in her new role, making an impact on Raise the Age, and her personal interest in juvenile justice.  You can read Austine’s post here.

Training for a Better You

On June 12-14, 2018, Global Youth Justice will host its 19th Global Youth Justice Training Institute in Cape Cod, MA.  Through more than 25 presenters, sessions, and workshops, participants will learn strategies to establish or enhance local volunteer-driven juvenile justice and youth justice diversion programs called Teen/Youth/Student/Peer Court or Peer Jury.  Topics will include youth and adult volunteer training; quality community service placements, programmatic enhancements, and operational strategies, administrative tips, grant writing, identifying funding opportunities, and more.  This will be the first year that both adults and youth will be able to attend.  To register and learn more about this exciting event, please check the website here.

training toy storyThe UNC School of Government is excited to announce that the “2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents” seminar has been rescheduled to Thursday, March 1 and registration is now open.  This full-day seminar provides training for attorneys who represent alleged contemnors in child support enforcement proceedings.  The seminar will begin with sessions on the requirements for civil and criminal contempt and the dispositional alternatives available to the trial court.  It continues with presentations on understanding the state and federal regulations, community resources for your clients, and advocacy in child support contempt cases.  The seminar also includes a one hour ethics session.  This training is open to public defenders and private attorneys who do appointed work and is geared toward attorneys who represent respondents in child support enforcement proceedings.  Pre-registration is required, there will be no onsite registration, and space is limited.  The registration deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 19.  To register online, as well as to find directions and other program information (including our cancellation and refund policy), please visit here.  If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact Tanya Jisa, Program Manager, jisa@sog.unc.edu or 919-843-8981, or Austine Long, Program Attorney, at along@sog.unc.edu or 919.962.9594.

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform(CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program until March 2.  This program will take place June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  The training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  For further details on this program and how to apply, please check out the link here.

That will be all for this week.  We will have more to come soon and we encourage you all to check back soon for updates and fresh announcements.

OJD Week In Review: Jan. 29-Feb. 2

This week we’ve been promoting some great new resources and opportunities, and continuing our momentum from the past few days, we just want to rehash a few things and introduce some other good nuggets for you all:

NCCRED Wants YOU

NCCREDThe North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) has opened applications for a new executive director.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Applications will be accepted until Feb. 15.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

New Resources

The North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients.  As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  In order to assist counsel in meeting the requirement of Padilla, IDS has contracted with two experienced immigration attorneys who will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.  An Immigration Consequences page has been added to IDS’ website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) has recently launched a Teen Dating Violence feature on its website.  This page offers links to the National Dating Abuse Helpline along with various publications and other resources to help victims and others involved with people who need aid or just want to be educated on the issue.   Their pages also provide further links to information on domestic violence, sexual assault, and “special populations”, including juveniles.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also released an updated review on “Interactions Between Youth and Law Enforcement“.  This document compiles research from various organizations, analyzing youth-initiated and police-initiated interactions, the impacts of such interactions on the juvenile justice system, police training programs, diversion programs and more.  The full review can be found here.

Training Opportunities

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favoriteThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

 

That will be all for this week.   There is plenty more to come in the next few weeks, so check back here early and often.  Also, if there is anything anyone in the N.C. juvenile defense community would like to submit to us to promote on our website and other channels, be sure to contact us and let us know.  We are always here to support you!

NCCRED Seeks a New Executive Director

The North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) is now accepting applications for an executive director.

The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.

To learn more about the job description and how to apply, please see the Indeed post here.

NCCRED

NCCRED is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that works across professional, political and ideological lines to identify, document and reduce racial disparities in North Carolina’s criminal justice system.  NCCRED brings together a diverse group of criminal justice leaders who share a commitment to building a more equitable, effective and humane criminal justice system in North Carolina.  Represented on the Commission are members of the Judiciary (Court of Appeals, Superior Court and District Court Judges), law enforcement professionals (Chiefs of Police and Department of Corrections), District Attorneys, Public Defenders, community advocates and scholars.  The Commission provides a forum for open dialogue, collective problem solving, information sharing and educating Commissioners on the most important developments in racially equitable criminal justice reform in North Carolina and across the nation.  NCCRED’s focus areas are pretrial justice, juvenile justice and policing.