OJD Week in Review: Feb. 5-9

This week there are some great opportunities for work, training and community building in juvenile defense.

Job Post Reminder and a Nice Little Feature

We want to remind everyone that the North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) will be closing applications for its executive director position on Feb. 15.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

NCCRED

If you haven’t already heard, the UNC School of Government recently added a post promoting the General Counsel Office of the Administrative Office of the Courts.  This post is a Q&A with LaToya Powell, former law professor of UNC and the new assistant legal counsel for the Office of General Counsel, working primarily in juvenile justice.  In the article, written by Austine Long, Powell discusses challenges in her new role, making an impact on Raise the Age, and her personal interest in juvenile justice.  You can read Austine’s post here.

Training for a Better You

On June 12-14, 2018, Global Youth Justice will host its 19th Global Youth Justice Training Institute in Cape Cod, MA.  Through more than 25 presenters, sessions, and workshops, participants will learn strategies to establish or enhance local volunteer-driven juvenile justice and youth justice diversion programs called Teen/Youth/Student/Peer Court or Peer Jury.  Topics will include youth and adult volunteer training; quality community service placements, programmatic enhancements, and operational strategies, administrative tips, grant writing, identifying funding opportunities, and more.  This will be the first year that both adults and youth will be able to attend.  To register and learn more about this exciting event, please check the website here.

training toy storyThe UNC School of Government is excited to announce that the “2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents” seminar has been rescheduled to Thursday, March 1 and registration is now open.  This full-day seminar provides training for attorneys who represent alleged contemnors in child support enforcement proceedings.  The seminar will begin with sessions on the requirements for civil and criminal contempt and the dispositional alternatives available to the trial court.  It continues with presentations on understanding the state and federal regulations, community resources for your clients, and advocacy in child support contempt cases.  The seminar also includes a one hour ethics session.  This training is open to public defenders and private attorneys who do appointed work and is geared toward attorneys who represent respondents in child support enforcement proceedings.  Pre-registration is required, there will be no onsite registration, and space is limited.  The registration deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 19.  To register online, as well as to find directions and other program information (including our cancellation and refund policy), please visit here.  If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact Tanya Jisa, Program Manager, jisa@sog.unc.edu or 919-843-8981, or Austine Long, Program Attorney, at along@sog.unc.edu or 919.962.9594.

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform(CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program until March 2.  This program will take place June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  The training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  For further details on this program and how to apply, please check out the link here.

That will be all for this week.  We will have more to come soon and we encourage you all to check back soon for updates and fresh announcements.

OJD Week in Review: Jan. 8-12

This week we are lighter on the usual training notifications, but there are some important updates to be shared.

Training, Job Opportunities, and Events

wvpviwDue to the winter weather and the holidays, the UNC School of Government has announced that the deadline to register for the 2018 Child Support Enforcement:  Representing Respondents seminar has now been extended until Jan. 15.  Registration and other information can be found here.

Registration is also now open for the School of Government’s Regional Training for Indigent Defense: Defending Sexual Offenses.  This event will offer 3.0 CLE credit hours and will have sessions covering cross-examining experts, physical evidence, and motions and legal issues in sexual offense cases.  The training will be held on Thursday, Feb. 8, in Room 103 of the Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center at 1801 Nash St. in Sanford, N.C.  The deadline to register is 5 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 29.  An $85 registration fee will be required which will cover materials, snacks, and CLE credits.  For registration, contact details and other info, please go here.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) will be supporting National Drug and Alcohol Facts week, sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  From Jan. 22-28, these organizations will be supporting community events nationwide and beyond that bring people together, from adolescents to experts, to discuss alcohol and drug abuse.  The National Institute on Drug Abuse will be providing free booklets about how to deal with drug abuse, in addition to other educational resources.

OJJDP will also be accepting nominations for their 2018 National Missing Children’s Day awards until Jan. 24.  They are seeking nominees for their Missing Children’s Citizen Award and Missing Children’s Child Protection Award.  These awards are meant to recognize private individuals who helped to recover a missing/abducted child and professionals, such as law enforcement officers and child protective service agents, who have worked to protect children from abuse and victimization.  For further details and to submit your nominations, please check here.

Finally, for those interested, there are four juvenile court counselor positions available in Iredell, Union, Cleveland and Forsyth counties that will be closing today.  Interested parties can view and apply to these jobs here.

Progression of Raise the Age

On Thursday, Jan. 11, the N.C. Juvenile Jurisdiction Advisory Committee (JJAC) met for its second meeting since the passage of the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act.  During the meeting, several presenters addressed the Committee with research data and considerations for the juvenile justice system prior to and after the changes to the law are implemented.

AOC Director Marion Warren and Brad Fowler, manager of the AOC Research, Policy, and Planning Division, shared AOC’s analysis of the possible workload increase and need for more staff.  Fowler emphasized the need to assess the resources going into the cases we have now to prepare the juvenile justice system for the arrival of more cases.  “The system to handle 16- and 17-year-olds will not drop out of the sky the day the law changes,” he said.  “Having [the pieces] in place before that time is the goal.”

William L Lassiter, deputy secretary of juvenile justice for the Department of Public Safety, went on to discuss considerations for fiscal year (FY) 2018-2019.  Lassiter pointed out the need for subcommittees within JJAC, the success of raising the age in other states, and the need for more staff, improved facilities and community programs to assist youth.  Lassiter said that when Raise the Age was implemented in other states, complaints and recidivism rates dropped significantly, especially for kids younger than 12, because more diversion programs were explored as more kids were brought into the juvenile justice system.  While discussing community programs, he praised the success of North Carolina’s own Teen Court program.  “Teen Court is much more consequential and has a higher level of accountability than regular court.  Kids don’t want their friends to get away with something they didn’t get away with,” he said jokingly, pointing out how juveniles had to admit their guilt for a crime in Teen Court and a jury of their peers would ensure that juveniles would receive a suitable punishment in the form of community service, in addition to a term on the Teen Court jury.  Lassiter stated that participants in the Teen Court program only had a 12 percent recidivism rate and he desired for every district to have their own program.  He gave JJAC a breakdown of potential costs for community programs, new transportation for juveniles, and hiring of additional staff over the next few years, up to FY 2020-2021, which included about 292 new positions.

JJAC

Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry offered a brief presentation on the history and structure of North Carolina’s juvenile indigent defense system and the Office of the Juvenile Defender’s plan in preparation for the implementation of the law.  Zogry emphasized the need for a dedicated juvenile defender system in our state while pointing out that the majority of N.C. counties lacked a designated juvenile defender.  Mary Stansell, Juvenile chief of the Wake County Public Defender’s Office and member of JJAC, backed Zogry’s point, citing examples from her own personal experience of working with lawyers who were not familiar with or just not committed to the specialized practice of juvenile defense.

The last presentation by the Honorable J. Corpening, chief district court judge of District 5, discussed several phases to develop the school-justice partnership program.  Corpening talked about establishing relationships with other judges at leadership training, the progression of the program so far for specific counties, and the need for a comprehensive toolkit, website, and other resources to assist counties in implementing their own school-justice partnership programs.

Finally, the Committee returned to Lassiter’s suggestion to establish subcommittees to assist in the planning and execution of the new initiatives they would have to address in the coming months.  Several members of JJAC and others in attendance were selected to serve on the subcommittees before the chairs called for the meeting to be adjourned.

That is all the news for this week.  To catch up on upcoming training seminars, please be sure to check out our past posts.  We will be providing further updates on training, the progress of the Raise the Age initiative, job opportunities and more each week, so be sure to subscribe to the blog, Facebook page, and Twitter for all the news we have going forward into 2018!

ICYMI: Registration for the 2018 Child Support Enforcement Seminar Closing Soon

Registration for the 2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents seminar is open until Friday, January 5.

TOPICS:  This full-day seminar provides training for attorneys who represent alleged contemnors in child support enforcement proceedings. The seminar will begin with sessions on the requirements for civil and criminal contempt and the dispositional alternatives available to the trial court.  It continues with presentations on understanding the state and federal regulations, community resources for your clients, and advocacy in child support contempt cases. The seminar also includes a one hour ethics session. An agenda is posted on the course webpage.

PARTICIPANTS: Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents is open to public defenders and private attorneys who do appointed work and is geared toward attorneys who represent respondents in child support enforcement proceedings.

TIMES: Check-in will be on Friday, January 19 from 8:00am to 8:45am, at which time the program will begin. The program ends at 4:15pm.

REGISTRATION: To register online, as well as to find directions and other program information (including our cancellation and refund policy), please visit: http://www.sog.unc.edu/courses/child-support-enforcement

Pre-registration is required and space is limited; the registration deadline is 5:00pm on FRIDAY, JANUARY 5. There is no on-site registration.

 FEE:  The registration fee for private assigned counsel is $160. This fee includes materials, parking, breaks, and lunch.  Thanks to support from IDS, there is no fee for IDS employees.

CREDIT:  The programs will offer six hours each of continuing legal education (CLE) credit, including one hour of ethics/professional responsibility.

HOTEL INFORMATION: A block of rooms is available for Thursday, January 18 at the Holiday Inn Express at a reduced nightly rate of $80.00 plus tax which includes a deluxe hot breakfast and Wi-Fi. To make a reservation online visit https://www.ihg.com/holidayinnexpress/hotels/us/en/chapel-hill/rdufr/hoteldetail or call the hotel directly at 919.489.7555 and mention Group Code CSJ. These rooms are being held on a first-come, first-served basis. The reservation deadline for the block rate is January 1, 2018.

TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT – IDS STATE EMPLOYEES ONLY: Travel reimbursement for IDS state employees is contingent upon state rules and regulations. For all questions regarding travel reimbursement, please contact Elise Wolper—Fiscal Officer at IDS—at 919.354.7200.  Please note travel reimbursement forms must be submitted to IDS Financial Services within 30 days of travel or reimbursement will be denied.

 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: We look forward to seeing you in January.  If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact Tanya Jisa, Program Manager,  jisa@sog.unc.edu or 919-843-8981, or Austine Long, Program Attorney, at along@sog.unc.edu or 919.962.9594.