OJD Week In Review: Nov. 6-10

This week we’ve got a few new resources and updates for you, just in case you haven’t already got them in your own inbox.

In the Week Behind Us

Last week the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice released a report titled “Developmental Reform in Juvenile Justice: Translating the Science of Adolescent Development to Sustainable Best Practice“.  This report is designed to assist local- and state-level organizations with incorporating “adolescent development research into their efforts to maximize improved and sustainable youth outcomes and system performance.”

Wake U

Also last week, NCCRED in collaboration with the Wake Forest University School of Law and Justice Program, the Wake Forest Journal of Law and Policy and the Wake Forest University Rethinking Community series held its Community Policing Symposium on Nov. 3.  The event featured a virtual lecture, a video presentation, and several discussions on how to improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve.  The summary for the event can be read here.

 

Lots of NJJN News

First in National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) news, we wanted to notify everyone that NJJN has  released a call to action to combat racism.  In their statement, NJJN acknowledges efforts in America’s history for civil rights and addresses the shortcomings of the juvenile justice system, particularly for youth of color, but also pointing out the marginalization of LGBTQI youth, children with disabilities and others.  NJJN also asks juvenile justice advocates to evaluate how we have approached racial injustice, to identify leadership, and  ask how we are held accountable.  Please take a moment to read the full article, which can be found here.

Secondly, NJJN has launched a campaign offering recommendations to improve relationships between police and youth of color.  They have a page on their website with a downloadable PDF with data and suggestions for distribution, and a press release template to help groups and individual advocates spread the word and get others involved.

Finally, NJJN has also announced that the Youth Justice Project will be hosting the #NJJNForum2018 in Durham.  This forum will celebrate the passage of Raise the Age in North Carolina and address much-needed reforms, such as eliminating collateral consequences, remedying racial and gender disparities, better access to defense for youth, and stemming the tide of referrals from schools to courts.  Currently, the organizations are seeking volunteers to join the Forum Planning Committee.  Please email Alyson Clements for more details.

Police Platform

More Useful Info

Earlier this week, the North Carolina Bar Association published an article by Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry about the National Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit.  In his writing, Zogry gives a brief account of his experience during the 21st annual conference.  You can read his article here and check out the NJDC page for more info on the Summit.

The Pew Charitable Trusts has created a chart, offering a visual display of data released from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  The data shows the declining rates of adjudicated youth  from 2006-2015, by state.  You can see the chart here.

From the On the Civil Side blog, Professor LaToya Powell’s has a new entry, “The Juvenile Court Counselor’s Role As Gatekeeper.”  You can read Professor Powell’s latest post here.

…and a Final Reminder

We also want to offer one final reminder that the Center for Death Penalty Litigation will be closing applications for its new staff attorney position on Monday, November 13.  You can view the full details about this position and how to apply here.

That is all for now.  We hope everyone has a safe and relaxing Veteran’s Day and there is more to come soon, so be sure to check back with us!

OJD Week In Review: Oct. 30 – Nov. 3

We hope everyone had a great Halloween, and this week we’ve got a few new updates to resources, training info, and reminders for you.

A Few Treats and (Possibly New) Tricks You Can Use

Never too old

The Youth Justice Project has released a new report titled “Putting Justice in North Carolina’s Juvenile System”.  This report points out areas in which North Carolina’s juvenile justice system is failing youth, especially youth of color.  The  report identifies five major barriers that are hindering the N.C. juvenile justice system, including one which sites inadequate resources for OJD.  You can read the report here.

The W. Haywood Burns Institute has updated its interactive map which illustrates significant racial and ethnic disparities in youth incarceration rates.  Through this map you can review how your state ranks in incarceration rates, compare which counties have incarcerated the most youth by race,  and filter data by measurement, race, offense and placement type.  You can view the map on their website here.

Registration is now open for the Winter Criminal Law Webinar: Case and Legislative Update.  This webinar is open to public defenders and private attorneys who are interested in or currently practicing indigent defense work and will cover recent criminal law decisions from the N.C. Appellate Court and N.C. Supreme Court.  The training will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 8, and will reward participants with 1.5 hours of general CLE credit.  There is a registration fee of $75 for privately assigned counsel, contract attorneys and other non-IDS employees.  Registration ends on Dec. 6 at 5 p.m.  To register and find more info on presenters and topics included in this event, please visit the School of Government’s page.

Whale TrT

Stretched and Fading Deadlines

The Center for Death Penalty Litigation in Durham has extended its deadline for applications for a new staff attorney.  The closing date for this position will now be November 13.  You can view the full details about this position and how to apply here.

Applications for the North Carolina Judicial Fellowship’s two-year fellowships (six openings) beginning in August 2018 will close today at 5 p.m.  If you want to get in a last-minute application, feel free to check their website and submit it fast!

And that is all for this week.  There will be more to come in the next few weeks, even in the holiday season, so continue to check back frequently.  Also, feel free to join the conversation on our social media pages and feel free to share, especially on the OJD Facebook page, if there is something you think is worth discussing in the juvenile defender community!

Job Opportunity: Staff Attorney for CDPL

The Center for Death Penalty Litigation in Durham, North Carolina seeks a new staff attorney.

CDPL is a non-profit law firm and advocacy organization that works to provide the highest quality representation to people facing execution, and to end the death penalty in North Carolina. CDPL’s commitment to representing indigent and disadvantaged defendants just as vigorously as corporate lawyers defend their highest-paying clients, and training other capital attorneys across the state to do the same, has saved the lives of many who faced execution. In addition to representing individual clients, CDPL spearheads litigation and public education campaigns that address systemic injustices and cast light on the arbitrariness and unfairness of our state’s capital punishment system. Over the past decade, CDPL has been a leading force in stopping executions in North Carolina.

Our team of attorneys, mitigation investigators, paralegals, and public education specialists works to identify strategic opportunities to change public opinion and reduce the use of the death penalty. Our office also has a strong commitment to racial equity, and works both internally and externally to combat systemic racism. In addition to handling individual cases, attorneys are encouraged to participate in cross-disciplinary projects that further our goals of ending the death penalty and promoting racial equity.

The ideal candidate will have:

  • Two to seven years of experience practicing law
  • Commitment to ending the death penalty and addressing systemic unfairness
  • Strong oral and written communications skills
  • Understanding of issues common in capital cases, such as mental illness, poverty, racism and substance abuse
  • Interest in advocacy and public education, in addition to direct representation of clients

Applicants should send a cover letter by October 2nd detailing interest, as well as a resume, the names of two professional references, and a writing sample of approximately 10 pages to Ms. Barrie Wallace at barrie@cdpl.org or to her attention at the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, 123 West Main Street, Suite 700, Durham, N.C. 27701.  For additional information, please contact Barrie Wallace at barrie@cdpl.org.

CDPL is committed to diversity and racial equity and is an equal opportunity employer.