Week in Review: Feb 8-12

Happy Friday Readers! We hope your week was productive with plenty of moments to catch your breath too. Couple of announcements for you this week, along with a new (and free) OJD CLE!

Tip of the Week!

Where Can I Find the Law on RTA?

If you want to see the Session Laws which include the Raise the Age changes, see:

Senate Bill 413: 2019 Session Amendments to the RTA Bill (Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act)

Senate Bill 257: The final bill budget for Session Law 2017; info pertaining to the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act can be found on pages 309-325

You can also check out the NC General Assembly website.  Look under “Bills and Laws,” then “General Statutes.”  You can search by citation or test, or you can look at Chapter 7B under the Table of Contents, and see the most recent changes to statute text on the right side of the statute.

FROM IDS

The Commission on Indigent Defense Services recently approved a modest, but much-needed, partial restoration of rates paid to private counsel providing representation in some case types. Specifically, the Commission voted to raise by $5 an hour the rate for high-level felonies, with a corresponding increase in non-hourly representation for adult criminal and juvenile delinquency proceedings. The Commission also voted to raise by $5 an hour the rate for DWI and Class A1 misdemeanors disposed of in the district court, with a corresponding increase in non-hourly representation. The increases approved by the Commission will take effect on March 1, 2021. Please click here to read the notice from Darrin Jordan, the Commission Chair, and IDS Executive Director, Mary Pollard. Also, if you have any questions, please reach out to Whitney Fairbanks via email.

Have you seen our #BlackHistoryMonth Spotlights?

Lyana Hunter (left) & Staisha Hamilton (right)

This week we showcased two amazing women and their work within the juvenile defense community. First up was Lyana Hunter and then Staisha Hamilton. To catch up on their spotlights, click here for Lyana and click here for Staisha!

OJD CLE OPPORTUNITY!

Wednesday, February 24, 2021 at 2:30 PM, OJD is hosting “Representing LGBT Youth”. This CLE will be presented by Ames Simmons, the Policy Director for Equality NC. This program will be a 90 minute CLE, with application pending and FREE TO THE FIRST 35 REGISTRANTS. This webinar includes a general review of introductory concepts and terminology related to LGBTQ identities, including the importance of pronouns to professionalism. We will discuss gender-expansive youth and the processes of gender transition for young people. We will talk about LGBTQ youth in out-of-home custody and present best practices for advocating for LGBTQ young people in the juvenile legal system. CLICK HERE TO REGISTER.

THATS ALL FOR THIS WEEK! HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND!

Week in Review: Jan 4-8

Happy New Year Readers! We hope your holiday was relaxing, lazy, and full of what makes you happy. It’s time to get back to work & as always, OJD is here to round up the week.

Tip of the Week

Complaints Received

We are focusing our Tips of the Week on stages of juvenile proceedings that disproportionately impact youth of color. This week we are considering complaints received:

Attorneys are appointed to cases once a complaint is received by juvenile justice, then filed as a complaint.  So generally attorneys can’t impact whether or not a complaint is received.  But attorneys can prevent the case from going to adjudication by:

  • Asking for a dismissal for various reasons, such as the victim no longer wishes to prosecute or the juvenile has already made amends through a mediation program or restitution.
  • Continue the case for an opportunity for the juvenile to participate in a program such as suggested above, or Teen Court if your jurisdiction has one.
  • After an admission, ask the court to informally defer prosecution without an adjudication.  While the Code does not explicitly discuss this, prosecutors have broad discretion to dismiss allegations under N.C.G.S. 7B-2404.  If an adjudication is entered, the court may still “dismiss the case” under 7B-2501(d), in effect not entering a disposition.

Reminders!

  1. You may know or remember from last year that IDS offered 11 free-to-attend webinars on forensic evidence. This year IDS will continue to offer the webinars as part of a more formal series, which will help make it easier for you to attend, while getting CLE credit! This new series will start on Feb. 4.

If you’d like to attend some or all of the programs, please sign up using the link below. We look forward to seeing you on the webinars! 

2. Duke University has only had a handful of responses from NC public defenders, and would really like more so that they can more accurately learn about practices in North Carolina specifically. 

You can find the survey at this link (https://virginia.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3V6Ob2DbXpPl4K9), and it will only take about 10 minutes to complete, and they will mail you a gift-card for your participation. The survey will be closing soon, so please complete it in the next two weeks.

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to reach out to william.crozier@duke.edu.

3. Have you seen the new Juvenile Code? See a sneak peek below! Thanks to Eric for the picture.

From LaTobia,

I am seeking guest writers for our blog for each month this year, specifically those in juvenile defense or youth advocacy work. Topics will be of your choice, but should include some supporting information such as statutes, cases or graphics. These blogs are geared to help fellow attorneys and create discussion in regards to juvenile proceedings and court processes. Feel free to send me an email at latobia.s.avent@nccourts.org so we can discuss this further or if you’d like to volunteer. Also, feel free to send this message to your colleagues and friends, whoever may be a great contributor. Thanks!

Risk and Needs Assessment (YASI) Sessions

Afternoon Defenders!

North Carolina Department of Public Safety Juvenile Justice Section will begin using a new risk and needs assessment instrument beginning January 1, 2021. This new tool is called the Youth Assessment and Screening Instrument (YASI).  DJJ is offering virtual Q&A’s on the new tool to assist with the use when it launches.

The virtual YASI sessions will be conducted via WebEx and all judicial officials are invited to attend one of the following virtual sessions:

Thursday, November 5, 2020 @ 10:00 am

Friday, November 6, 2020 @ 10:00 am

Friday, November 6, 2020 @ 1:00 pm

Monday, November 9, 2020 @ 3:00 pm

Wednesday, November 18, 2020 @ 2:30 pm

 Tuesday, November 24, 2020 @ 12:00 pm

Please select a date for the meeting you would like to join via WebEx. Once you have selected your date, please email Crystal Wynn-Lewis at crystal.wynn-lewis@ncdps.gov to register for the date you are interested in attending. After you have registered, you will receive a WebEx invitation for the session selected. Please RSVP by Friday, October 30, 2020.

On behalf of Deputy Secretary William Lassiter, please see the attached New Risk and Needs Assessment (YASI) Q &A Sessions memo for your review. Please feel free to forward this to your professional associations to inform them of the upcoming trainings. Thank you.  

Week in Review: July 27-31

Good morning readers! It’s the last week in July, can you believe it? Is time flying by or is it just us? Let’s start your weekend off with a new OJD blog.

Raise the Age Tip of the Week

How Do I Know the State Will be Seeking the Gang Enhancement Against My Juvenile?

Under current law, there is no process for notice to the juvenile and the juvenile’s attorney that the state is seeking the gang enhancement.  As the juvenile’s attorney, you should consider the following:

  • Get a copy of the gang assessment from DJJ prior to adjudication
  • Argue that the notice of gang enhancement be presented pre-adjudication
  • Develop a theory of defense against client’s involvement in gang activity
  • Prepare for a hearing on the issue
  • Request a hearing, similar to an adjudicatory hearing
  • Request the court make findings on the record and appeal where  appropriate

A Bit of Housekeeping!

OJD is working from home for now and if you need to reach us for a case consultation, upcoming training, or have a question about court? Don’t forget you can email us for a faster response! Click here for links to our email addresses.

Upcoming Events

August 7, 2020 from 3:00-4:00 PMJen Story, Tessa Hale, Mary Stansell are presenting a new CLE: Making the Connection- Education Advocacy and Juvenile Defense. Come to this session to learn the basics of special education laws and school-based intervention plans; how to issue-spot when students’ unaddressed needs in schools are exacerbating their behaviors; and how to incorporate this knowledge into your advocacy in a way that sets juveniles up for long-term success.  You can register for this CLE here and will be sent the meeting link information afterwards.

Thursday, August 13, 6:00-7:30 please join us for COVID-19: The State of Our Mental Health Part II. This session will focus on the mental health and issues younger adults and youth are facing due to this pandemic. Featuring Nikki Croteau-Johnson, MA, LPA, Clinical Program Director at NC Child Treatment Program and Dorothy Hairston-Mitchell, Clinical Associate Professor and Supervising Attorney for the Juvenile Law Clinic at NCCU. Please click here to register for the event. You will receive the Zoom link afterward registering.

Opportunity!

LaTobia is looking for guest bloggers to contribute to our Week in Review. Defenders and those in juvenile justice are welcome to write in on topics of their expertise: secure custody, mental health in juveniles, etc! We want to hear from you! There’s plenty more weeks left in the year! Reach out to LaTobia here for more information.

THAT’S ALL FOR JULY! HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND!

Week in Review: July 6-10

Happy Friday Readers! 2nd week in July done and over, but was plenty busy for OJD. Webinars, meetings, court, you name it! So here’s your weekly recap plus a great tip.

Tip of the Week:

Tip of the Week – My Client is in Detention… How Do I Find Them?

There are currently eight detention centers in North Carolina:

  • Alexander Juvenile Detention Center in Taylorsville
  • Cabarrus Regional Juvenile Detention Center in Concord
  • Cumberland Regional Juvenile Detention Center in Fayetteville
  • New Hanover Regional Juvenile Detention Center in Castle Hayne
  • Pitt Regional Juvenile Detention Center in Greenville
  • Wake Juvenile Detention Center in Raleigh
  • Durham County Youth Home in Durham
  • Guilford County Detention Center in Greensboro

Check with your court counselor’s office to find out which location your client is being held, and check here for contact information to visit and call your client.

Webinar, Anyone?

  • NC CRED is hosting a webinar, Wednesday, July 15th from 3:00-4:30 PM entitled, “Balancing The Scales: The Injustice Of Confederate Monuments In Public Spaces.” This webinar how these figures are antiethical to equality under the law and it’s placement at courthouses, plus more. To read more about the presenters and to register for this event, please click here.
  • Join NACDL for a Free Virtual Discussion on Race + Pretrial Practices, Tuesday, July 14th at 4:00 PM entitled, “Policing Black Bodies: Race and Pretrial Practices.” This webinar will discuss the issues of racial bias and racial disparity and how they are pervasive in the criminal legal system. To read more on the details of this webinar and to register, click here.
  • DEFENDERS! DON’T MISS OUT ON A FREE CLE! July 24, 2020 at 3:00-4:00 PMInterviewing and Counseling Youth: Presented by Dorothy Hairston-Mitchell, Clinical Assistant Professor & Supervising Attorney, Juvenile Law Clinic at NCCU. You can register here and will be sent link information afterwards.

OJD is covering CLE costs for the first 30 registrants and CLE is pending.

Want to meet our Summer 2020 Interns? Read below!

Alex Palme

My name is Alexander Jeffrey Palme and I am from Sanford, NC. I am 24 years old and am married.  I have been playing various sports since I was very young and currently play professional soccer in the UPSL for Moros FC in my free time. I have degrees in Sociology and Anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where I also wrote a study that I self-published on the recommendation of my professor. I will be in my third year of law school at NCCU and am currently operating under a practicing certificate from the NC bar. I plan to take the UBE next summer and would ultimately love to be on the bench. Last summer I clerked for Legal Aid’s Senior Law Project in Asheville, NC. 

Alex is currently assisting in case research with our Assistant Juvenile Defenders and helping outline our Pocket Guides which will be distributed to defenders soon!

Terris Riley

Mrs. Terris Riley, a native of South Carolina, is law student at North Carolina Central University School of Law with an expected graduation in 2022. As a non-traditional student, she has over 22 years of experience in the Information Technology industry—both private and public sector. She has received numerous local, regional and national awards for her leadership in technology. In 2013, Mrs. Riley’s IT firm was awarded and recognized as South Carolina’s No. 3 Best Performing Business in the State. She later founded a non-profit to pursue activism work for Justice Reform. Prior to relocating to North Carolina for law school, Mrs. Riley served as the Director of Constituent Support for Democratic National Committee Chairwoman and South Carolina House Representative Gilda Cobb-Hunter, the longest serving Member of the SC General Assembly. Upon graduation, she desires to work as an Assistant United States Attorney.

Terris is currently assisting with webinar series and communications, and she brings with her experience with the Virtual Justice Project.

We can’t wait to see the work you two do this summer with OJD!

Week in Review: Feb 9-13

Good Morning Readers! We know it has been a chaotic week and one filled with a bit of stress. So we’ll keep it light and airy, an easy blog post for your enjoyment.

Appeals Tip of the Week: Courtesy of David Andrews, Office of the Appellate Defender

Suppression motions and contested adjudicatory hearings – If the suppression motion is denied, object when the evidence is admitted at the adjudication hearing because the failure to do so creates a heavier burden on appeal. A pretrial ruling on a motion to suppress is “preliminary,” which means the juvenile must object when evidence is offered during the adjudication hearing. State v. Waring, 364 N.C. 443 (2010). The failure to object when the evidence is admitted subjects the argument to plain error review on appeal. State v. Stokes, 357 N.C. 220 (2003).

Training

An announcement regarding the upcoming Watauga County CLE will be posted later today due to COVID concerns.

Need something to listen to while you work? How about the OJD Podcast?

You can listen to the new podcast here on Soundcloud. Our first episode features Dorothy Hairson-Mitchell, Clinical Assistant Professor/Supervising Attorney Juvenile Law Clinic, NC Central University School of Law, Durham, NC. We have new episodes coming soon!

Stay Safe! See you next week!

Week in Review: March 2-6

What a week for OJD! Started off smooth sailing and then 2 days at the UNC School of Government for the Intensive Juvenile Defender Training. But we’ll get to that later, first substance!

Appeals Tip of the Week: Courtesy of David Andrews, Office of the Appellate Defender

If the trial attorney does not file any motion to suppress, (or make an oral motion as allowed by §7B-2408.5(e)), the juvenile cannot raise a suppression issue on appeal. State v. Miller, 2018 N.C. LEXIS 425. If the juvenile made a confession or was subject to a search or seizure, you should strongly consider filing and litigating a suppression motion.

NEW COA OPINIONS!

There has been a new Court of Appeals opinion and we have that available to you on our website under Materials for Defenders > Case Summaries. Remember this page has many different summaries that can help you in your defense. Here’s a link to In The Matter of H.D.H. the most recent update.

2020 Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights Section Annual Meeting

The NCBA Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights Section are having their annual meeting and CLE on Thursday, May 4, 2020 at the NC Bar Center in Cary. The topic discuss Raise the Age in different aspects, such as: The Juvenile Court Counselors View, School to Prision Pipeline and will also have a Juvenile Justice Panel. Check-in begins at 8:30 AM and the CLE will end at 12:15. If you are interested, you can reach out to Eric for more information.

UPCOMING TRAINING!

Last but not least! Training Recap: 2020 Intensive Juvenile Defender Training at UNC SOG.

2 full days of learning at the UNC School of Government did not go unappreciated. Defenders learned topics ranging from Adolescent Behavior to Disposition Advocacy. Packed with workshops and discussions on how to advocate for our youth, UNC and OJD did a great job of bringing defenders out and lifting them up in the defense community. Take a look at some photos below.

Week in Review: Feb 24-28

If I told you that OJD had the busiest week, would you believe us? From grant meetings to trainings, the work never stops when OJD is making juvenile justice a bit better in North Carolina.

Appeals Tip of the Week: Courtesy of David Andrews, Office of the Appellate Defender

N.C. Gen. Stat. § 7B-2408.5 governs suppression motions in juvenile court. Under the statute, the suppression motion must include an affidavit. In adult cases, the failure to include an affidavit waives the suppression issue, even on appeal. State v. Holloway, 311 N.C. 573 (1984).

Upcoming Trainings

Remember! OJD is reporting and covering CLE fees.

Juvenile Enhancement Training Recap

First, OJD would like to thank all of our guest speakers who presented at the Juvenile Enhancement Training: Dr. Julianne Ludlam, Dorothy Hairston-Mitchell, Kim Howes, Terri Johnson, Eric Zogry, L. Chantel Cherry-Lassiter & Mary Stansell. We appreciate your time and effort to make this CLE possible and a success. A big thank you to Austine Long for organizing and scheduling this event, and one to LaTobia for getting the materials printed and arranged so nicely.

Topics covered included: Raise the Age, Adolescent Behavior, Collateral Consequences, Interviewing and Expunctions. It was a long but educational day. Subscribe to our blog for more training announcements. Take a look at some photos below!

Next up, UNC SOG Intensive. See you next week!

Week in Review: Feb 17-21 (Corrected)

This post has been edited to correct CLE presentation information due to inaccurate names. MY APOLOGIES! – LaTobia

Happy SNOW DAY Friday Readers! Parts of North Carolina are covered in snow but that doesn’t mean that OJD takes a break. We’re still working hard even if we want to go make snow angels.

Appeals Tip of the Week: Courtesy of David Andrews, Office of the Appellate Defender

More on Motions to Dismiss – If there are specific elements that you believe are not satisfied by the evidence, argue about those elements after you raise the general arguments outlined in last week’s tip. If the judge asks for specific variance arguments and you are not aware of any, tell the
judge that you are raising a variance argument to preserve the issue for appeal. Prior case law finds that if there is a variance between the offenses alleged in the petitions and any offense for which the state’s evidence may have been sufficient and that adjudicating the juvenile delinquent of those offenses would violate Due Process under the United States and North Carolina constitutions.

Wake County Bar CLE

Eric & Tawanda Foster presented a CLE at the Wake County Bar Association Tuesday. Take a look at Tawanda present below.

Take a look at Eric who presented with LaToya Powell February 14, on how Raise the Age and School Justice Partnerships impact racial and ethnic disparities in the juvenile justice system.

Juvenile Enhancement Training

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We’re days away from our Juvenile Enhancement Training. We have a wide wealth of knowledge headed to AOC to train our defenders on varying Juvenile Justice Topics. Make sure you check back next week for a round-up of just how we did that!

2020 Intensive Juvenile Defender Training

The UNC School of Government has announced their 2020 Intensive Juvenile Defender Training. The deadline for registration is quickly approaching. The training will offer approximately 12.75 hours of CLE credit, which includes one hour of ethics. To read the full post and register before February 26, click here.

One More Thing!

Have you seen our Who We Are page? There’s been an update [with one more to come ;)]. Take a look here.

Week in Review: Feb 3-7

Happy Friday readers! We hope this week was productive, exciting and successful!

Appeals Tip of the Week: Courtesy of David Andrews, Office of the Appellate Defender

Make constitutional arguments when available. If you anticipate making constitutional arguments, put the argument in a motion and get a ruling on it. “Constitutional issues not raised . . . at trial will not be considered for the first time on appeal.” State v. Gainey, 355 N.C. 73 (2002). If an unexpected issue arises and you cannot file a motion, constitutionalize your objection. Due Process is most likely an appropriate basis for your objection.

Upcoming Training!

February 14th will be the last day OJD accepts RSVP for our Juvenile Enhancement Training on February 26. Closing the RSVP will ensure we have printed enough materials for all guests and can account for some goodies we’ll have available! Make sure you RSVP now!

OJD Visits NCCU

It’s all about community building. The future lawyers at North Carolina Central University attended an Informational Career Fair and OJD was there to spark some interest in Juvenile Defense. LaTobia did a great job organizing the OJD table and speaking to the students about the importance of defending children, opportunities in policy or direct representation in juvenile defense and many other exciting things OJD has to offer for them. Thank you to NCCU for allowing us to come by and talk!

NEW JOB OPPORTUNITY!

The IDS Commission is seeking the next Executive Director for IDS and the position has been posted hereThe position closes February 18, 2020, and the Commission expects to conduct interviews March 26 or 27. 

This is an exciting opportunity for someone with a vision for public defense in North Carolina and an interest in working with great people to turn that vision into reality. 

If you want to learn more about North Carolina’s Indigent Defense Services and how you can be of great help to our community, visit the IDS Website.

Thanks for stopping by! Make sure you come back next week for another Week in Review!