Week in Review: March 15-19

Happy Friday Readers! Short and sweet Week in Review for you today. We’re at the middle of the month and who doesn’t love getting to the weekend faster?

Tip of the Week

Transcript of Admission

Filling out a transcript of admission on any admission of a new offense is important for several reasons.  It memorializes the record of admission in writing if subject to an appeal.  Reviewing the transcript with your client helps your client better understand the admission and the rights s/he is asserting or waiving.  Make sure you complete the transcript with your client present and do so in a confidential space. Consider making a copy of the transcript to keep at the attorney table to help your client answer questions.  Stand with your client when the court asks your client the listed questions and be prepared to confer with your client if any issues arise.

PAC Fee App & New Juvenile Rates

The Office of the Juvenile Defender has been notified of an increasing number of errors on fee applications for delinquency matters.  In order that all fee applications can be processed, and payments issued in a timely manner, please read the following MEMO & view the Juvenile Rates Chart.

March CLE!

Have you registered for our Challenging North Carolina’s Automatic Transfer Laws, presented by David Andrews? Join us March 24, 2021 from 4:00-5:00 PM. This CLE will be 1 hour long, with CLE currently pending. Please remember this CLE is DEFENDER ONLY.

This presentation will provide juvenile defense attorneys with an understanding of North Carolina statutory provisions for the automatic transfer of children from juvenile court to adult criminal court.  The presentation will also discuss strategies and arguments that juvenile defense attorneys can use to challenge automatic transfer laws, including provisions in the United States and North Carolina constitutions covering due process, cruel and unusual punishment, equal protection, and the right to counsel.

To register, please click here.

From a Lawyer’s View: Youthful Offenders – What to Do When Clients Want to Be Transferred

Who are youthful offenders?

In the jurisdiction where I practice, we refer to 16-17 year-old clients who are subject to potential mandatory transfer to superior court as youthful offenders. This age group has its own special needs and challenges. One challenge is when your client either refuses an offer that will allow him/her to stay in juvenile court and/or requests transfer to superior court.

We know from science that adolescent brains are not fully developed until approximately between the ages of 21-25. We know that these differences in brain development have practical implications which impact their ability to plan ahead and think in hypothetical terms. We also know that they exhibit a greater degree of risk taking and more easily succumb to peer pressure. All of these factors (and more) influence their ability to make decisions and affect a teen’s ability to exhibit self-control. Additionally, they tend to be less sensitive to negative consequences. All of these factors (and more) played a role in North Carolina finally implementing the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act (also known as Raise the Age) to include youth under 18 under juvenile court jurisdiction for many offenses.

N.C.G.S. §7B-2200.5 requires a youth who is charged with an A-G felony offense to be transferred to superior court for trial as an adult after a finding of probable cause or indictment. So how does this impact your representation of a 16 or 17 year old client who tells you s/he wants to be transferred to superior court or refuses to admit to an offer that will allow him/her to remain in juvenile court?

What Is Our Role?

The first, and most important, thing to remember is that as defenders our role is NOT to advocate for the best interest of our client. We are express interest advocates and represent our juvenile clients with the same zealous advocacy that we do for our adult clients – even if we disagree with the decision s/he is making once we’ve counseled him/her regarding the benefits and risks of any decision. This means we must give our clients all the information they need, in language they can understand (i.e. age appropriate) to allow them to make their own decision. There is nothing wrong with challenging their thought process or asking someone they respect to have a conversation with them about the risk of transfer.

Assuming you have exhausted all your options in advising your client, and despite all your good legal advice your client insists on moving forward, what do you do? I would suggest the following:

  1. Get a second opinion – talk to a local attorney who you trust or contact our office to get advice on other ways to advise your client.
  2. Review with your client the possible collateral consequences of a transfer to superior court. OJD has a form that lists possible risks/consequences of transfer that requires your client to acknowledge that s/he has been informed and is choosing to transfer against advice of counsel. You can access the form here.
  3. Put it on the record. Make the court aware of your client’s decision, but do it in a professional manner that doesn’t negatively impact the court’s view of your client.

Lastly,

4. Respect your client’s decision. You may disagree, but it’s important to respect your client’s agency in making a decision that s/he will have to live with.

Written by Kim Howes, Assistant Juvenile Defender for The Office of the Juvenile Defender. Kim Howes has extensive juvenile court knowledge and directly represents juveniles for OJD while also supporting the middle districts of North Carolina, including Wake & Durham counties.

From A Lawyer’s View: The Kitchen Sink

Over the past several months, attorneys at the Office of the Juvenile Defender, the Wake County Public Defender’s Office, and my office (the Office of the Appellate Defender) have been strategizing on how to challenge automatic transfer from juvenile court to superior court.  One other attorney – Katie Kerr – served as both scribe and generator-of-ideas.  Katie helped move this process along and deserves a great deal of credit for pulling us over the finish line.  The finish line, of course, are new packets for juvenile defenders to challenge automatic transfer from district court to superior court.

The new packets come in two varieties.  One for 13-, 14-, and 15-year-olds and one for 16- and 17-year-olds.  Each packet contains instructions, a motion and a supporting memorandum for district court, and a separation motion and memorandum for superior court. 

Why all the fuss?  There two primary concerns: completeness and waiver. 

Regarding completeness: Those of us who worked on these packets tried to come up with any and all arguments that might convince a court to strike down automatic transfer.  The kitchen sink, you might say.  We might have missed a few arguments, but we included several, including procedural and substantive due process, cruel and unusual punishment, and even the deprivation of the right to counsel.  We don’t know which – if any – of these ideas might work, but we hope that at least one will.

Regarding waiver: Appeals are byzantine.  There are many traps for the unwary, including waiver.  In order to blunt inevitable waiver arguments on appeal, we strongly recommend that you challenge automatic transfer in both juvenile court and adult court.  File the motions and memoranda.  Then, raise all of the arguments orally and get rulings on them all.  As I mentioned above, we might not win on the merits, but we at least want to be able to argue the merits on appeal.

If you have questions about challenging automatic transfer, I encourage you to post them to the juvenile listserv.  I guarantee others will have the same concerns.  And good luck litigating this important issue!

The motions and instructions can be located on the Office of the Juvenile Defender website in the Defender’s Only Section. If you need to obtain access, please contact LaTobia Avent at Latobia.s.avent@nccourts.org


Written by, David Andrews. David W. Andrews is an Assistant Appellate Defender in the North Carolina Office of the Appellate Defender (OAD), a division of the Office of Indigent Defense Services. OAD staff attorneys represent indigent clients in criminal, juvenile delinquency, and involuntary commitment appeals to the Court of Appeals of North Carolina and the Supreme Court of North Carolina.

Your 2020 Year in Review

We have reached the Year in Review portion of our weekly reviews! How did we get here so fast?! While this year has been the most challenging, between Zoom & WebEx, crashing technology and “Can you hear me?” ten times a day, everyone has worked so hard to keep our support of #JuvenileJustice strong. So true to tradition we have put together a culmination of what OJD has done throughout the year and it feels like so much :D.

With the tremulous year of 2020 ending, The Office of the Juvenile Defender (OJD) would like to recap how the year unfolded through it all. We’ll review how OJD hired a new Assistant Juvenile Defender, hosted new trainings, managed the first year of Raise the Age (RTA), and produced several materials as required for the second year of the federal OJJDP grant. OJD has worked throughout the year to keep our defenders informed and supported, while working on new ways to serve the state, such as our Regionalization plan.

Activities and Initiatives Since COVID-19 

Since the beginning of the pandemic, OJD has held weekly check-ins to speak about current projects, ways to engage in the community without physical contact, and how to support defenders in the best way through the various projects listed in this report. OJD has been reaching out to defenders in the field, offering support and resources and gathering information to relay to the defender community.  Additionally, we have communicated with other court actors, especially juvenile justice administration, to stay updated with ongoing changes in policies and procedures. We began work on additional pocket guides like the RTA guide released in December. Each guide will highlight a specific area of juvenile delinquency law and provide defender strategies, such as secure custody and adjudication. We also began developing remote training capabilities and plan to pilot trainings during the court closure. Each one of these activities and initiatives will be discussed further below along with updates from the initiatives from 2019.

Raise the Age

              While RTA implementation has been slowed by the impact of COVID on the courts, OJD has been steadily reacting to the impact of the new law: 

  • General consulting on trial and appellate issues 
  • Focusing on specific issues, including indictment procedure and the intersection of bonds with youth in detention 
  • Challenging the “automatic” transfer provisions through motions practice 
  • Working with IDS General Counsel on the development of a comprehensive chart on the appointment/payment/recoupment of attorneys representing transferred juveniles 
  • Participation on the Juvenile Jurisdiction Advisory Committee, with a focus on discussing ongoing conforming changes to the law, as well as the minimum age of juvenile jurisdiction in NC (it is currently 6, the lowest stated age in the U.S.) 

Take a break, settle in and get comfy, and read our 2020 Year in Review here.

Week in Review: August 3-7

Happy Friday Readers! As the meme above says, another good week done! Thank you for all that you do in these times with our youth and in your daily lives. We know things are a bit crazy and harder than normal for everyone. You rock!

TIP OF THE WEEK

Transcript of Admission Tips 

Filling out a transcript of admission on any admission of a new offense is important for several reasons.  It memorializes the record of admission in writing if subject to an appeal.  Reviewing the transcript with your client helps your client better understand the admission and the rights s/he is asserting or waiving.  Make sure you complete the transcript with your client present and do so in a confidential space. Consider making a copy of the transcript to keep at the attorney table to help your client answer questions.  Stand with your client when the court asks your client the listed questions and be prepared to confer with your client if any issues arise.

Webinar?

Continuing with our collaboration with the School of Law at NCCU and the Virtual Justice Project, Part II of our Covid-19: The State of Our Mental Health webinar will be Thursday, August 13 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM. This is not a CLE.

Our guest speakers are Nikki Croteau-Johnson, MA, LP, HSP-PA from the NC Child Treatment Program in Durham, NC and Dorothy Hairston-Mitchell, Clinical Associate Professor and Supervising Attorney of the Juvenile Law Clinic at NCCU, and Jesse Edmonds, a Juvenile Court Counselor with NC DPS.

From discussions about the new school model, missing out on graduation to the shaking of their everyday lives, this webinar is intended on how to best adapt to our youth’s new path into growing up in a pandemic. Click here to register.

CLE REMINDER!

TODAY! from 3:00-4:00 PM. 

Jen Story, Tessa Hale, Mary Stansell are presenting a new CLE: Making the Connection- Education Advocacy and Juvenile Defense. 

Come to this session to learn the basics of special education laws and school-based intervention plans; how to issue-spot when students’ unaddressed needs in schools are exacerbating their behaviors; and how to incorporate this knowledge into your advocacy in a way that sets juveniles up for long-term success.  You can register for this CLE here and will be sent the meeting link information afterwards

This CLE is DEFENDER ONLY! OJD is covering CLE costs for the first 30 registrants and CLE is pending.

That’s all we have for this week!

Week in Review: May 4-8

Thanks for stopping by for another Week in Review! Plenty of meetings and calls this week as NC gears up to reopen our courts and we’re so ready to share new ways to pursue juvenile justice in this new time. Remember, if you have any questions or suggestions, we are more than willing to help.

Also! OJD is looking to develop and provide webinar training to our Juvenile Defenders throughout this pandemic. We are currently requesting topics and information you would like to have discussed. Please email Austine Long with your thoughts. Thank you.

TIP OF THE WEEK

Youth Development Center commitment

We are focusing our Tips of the Week on stages of juvenile proceedings that disproportionately impact youth of color. This week we are considering commitment to a youth development center (YDC):

  • Whenever disposition is being entered for your client, always argue for the lowest level of disposition.  A small number of points, or a violation of probation, can quickly send your client to YDC.
  • Consult with the court counselor and the ADA on their recommendations to the court.  If possible, negotiate a lesser disposition than YDC commitment before court.
  • Meet with your client before the dispositional hearing and provide the court with an alternative disposition plan that considers the safety of the community and your client’s needs.
  • Provide in court testimony from supportive community members.
  • Consider offering the court recent recidivism studies which indicate that commitment to YDC is factor for increased recidivism in juveniles. 

Resources

  • May 14, 2020 at 11 AM: NC CRED presents an interactive round-table webinar with leading experts in the North Carolina public health and criminal justice systems. The webinar will explore current conditions in North Carolina and discuss actionable steps to help mitigate the adverse effects on people in North Carolina who is a webinar about preparing and conducting video conference secure custody hearings. The speaker will discuss best practices, confidentiality and other important issues concerning video conferencing hearings.are involved with the criminal justice system. To register for this webinar, click HERE.
  • From the Coalition for Juvenile Justice and the National Juvenile Justice Network member call, “COVID-19: The Heightened Dangers of Confinement” here are some resources they discussed.
  1. Distinction between medical isolation and solitary (AMEND at UCSF)
  2. A list of disability specific issues/resources (NDRN)
  3. Center for Educational Excellence in Alternative Settings
  4. Council of Juvenile Justice Administrators
  5. National Commission on Correctional Healthcare
  6. National Partnership on Juvenile Service
  7. Stop Solitary for Kids
  8. Tolerance.org

Thanks for stopping by!

Week in Review: Apr 27 – May 1

Welcome to May Readers! April went by a whole lot faster than March and we’re glad everyone is still safe and joining us for another OJD Week in Review.

TIP OF THE WEEK

Secure Custody

We are focusing our Tips of the Week on stages of juvenile proceedings that disproportionately impact youth of color. This week we are considering secure custody:

  • If possible, find out if your client is being detained before the initial secure custody hearing.  It’s critical to start the attorney-client relationship early and inform your client of their rights as well as what to expect at the hearing.
  • If you meet your client for the first time at the initial secure custody hearing, take a few minutes to introduce yourself, describe your role, and answer any questions about the hearing.
  • Come up with a plan for release:  reasonable conditions on your client, alternative placements, or other information that will help the court support a decision for release.
  • If your client is shackled, argue for the removal prior to court starting.  Shackling has an intense, lasting impact on your client and removal can be a good first step to developing confidence with your client. 
  • If your client is not released, make a plan to contact or visit them in detention to discuss next steps.  Make sure the parent/guardian has the contact information for the detention center as well to facilitate calls or visits.
  • If your client is released, make an appointment to meet before the next court date.  Review any conditions of release and encourage your client to contact you with any questions.

JOB OPPORTUNITY

IDS is seeking applicants for the Contracts Administrator and the position has been posted here:

https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/northcarolina/jobs/2768601/contracts-administrator

The position closes May 7 at 5pm. This is a great way to contribute to indigent defense in North Carolina for a detailed and energetic individual.

RESOURCES

  1. Resources from Racial Justice for Youth: A Toolkit for Defenders can help you advocate for your many detained clients who are youth of color:

Sign up to access the Toolkit’s defender-only resources.

2. SAVE THE DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 14 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

COVID-19: Implications of the Pandemic within the Criminal Justice System

NC CRED presents an interactive round-table webinar with leading experts in the North Carolina public health and criminal justice systems.

3. Rewatch Strategies for Youth Webinar: Improving Law Enforcement/Youth Interactions in Times of Crisis

HOPE THE START OF YOUR MONTH AND WEEKEND ARE GREAT!

THANKS FOR READING! JOIN US NEXT FRIDAY!

Week in Review: April 20-24

Hello from Friday with OJD. Another work from home week means that OJD is rounding up resources and information for you, anything we can do to help. It always goes without saying but thank you so much for your dedication to continuing the good (juvenile justice) fight, even from your homes.

TIP OF THE WEEK

Complaints Received

We are focusing our Tips of the Week on stages of juvenile proceedings that disproportionately impact youth of color. This week we are considering complaints received:

Attorneys are appointed to cases once a complaint is received by juvenile justice, then filed as a complaint.  So generally attorneys can’t impact whether or not a complaint is received.  But attorneys can prevent the case from going to adjudication by:

  • Asking for a dismissal for various reasons, such as the victim no longer wishes to prosecute or the juvenile has already made amends through a mediation program or restitution.
  • Continue the case for an opportunity for the juvenile to participate in a program such as suggested above, or Teen Court if your jurisdiction has one.
  • After an admission, ask the court to informally defer prosecution without an adjudication.

Resources

  1. IDS recently released information on how PAC can file fee apps for teleconferencing and interim fee apps. Please visit ncids.org for more information.
  2. Legal Aid-ACS has synthesized the federal and state guidance that has come out to date and offer concrete tips and resources for advocating for students during school closures. You can get more information here. There are five documents: 
  3. On Friday, May 1st from 11 AM to 12 PM, Legal Aid-ACS is also hosting a Coronavirus-and-Education Know Your Rights training via Zoom and Facebook Live.  The ZOOM link is at: https://zoom.us/j/91168580266. This session will include overviews of recent guidance, along with lots of practical tips for advocating for students. For those who can’t attend the live session, a video recording will also be available on Legal Aid of NC’s Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/LegalAidNC ) for families and advocates to access whenever they are available.

THANKS FOR READING!!

AS ALWAYS, HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND AND BE SAFE!!

Week in Review: Jan 13-17

Happiest of Friday’s to you OJD readers! This week was full of meetings and trainings… AND INTERVIEWS! We narrowed down the candidates for the Assistant Juvenile Defender position and began the second round of interviews this week. We’re so excited to have a new attorney with us in the office, this is going to be a hard choice!

APPEALS TIP OF THE WEEK: Courtesy of David Andrews, Office of the Appellate Defender

  • When you appeal, do these things:
    • Make sure the juvenile has the right to appeal. Generally, the juvenile can appeal from a dispositional order.
    • Give proper and timely notice of appeal.
    • Prepare an appellate entries with all of the hearing dates and have the judge sign it on the day you give notice of appeal.
    • Ask the judge to stay the dispositional order.
    • If the dispositional order is not stayed and the order requires the juvenile to be placed in custody, argue that compelling reasons do not exist to keep the juvenile in custody during the appeal.
    • Make sure the clerk sends the recordings to the court reporter and the court file to the appellate attorney in a timely manner.

Public Defenders! Wonder what the rate is for your current cases? Click here for the IDS Rate Information & Calculators.

Upcoming Trainings:

Juvenile Defender Enhancement Training February 26, 2020 – Sponsored by the Office of the Juvenile Defender, this training will provide vital Juvenile Defense topics such as: Transfer Hearings, Raise the Age Advocacy and Addressing Trauma in Adolescents. We have guest speakers and are covering the CLE cost & reporting 6 CLE training hours.

Intensive Juvenile Defender Training, March 4-5, 2020 – Brought to you by the UNC School of Government. The training will offer approximately 12.75 hours of CLE credit, which includes one hour of ethics. The tentative agenda is posted on the course page. Final session times may vary depending on the schedules of the instructors. Click the link for more information!

JOB OPENINGS

Center for Death Penalty Litigation (CDPL)

The Center for Death Penalty Litigation (CDPL) in Durham, North Carolina has two openings for staff attorneys.

CDPL is a non-profit law firm and advocacy organization that works to provide the highest quality representation to people facing execution, and to end the death penalty in North Carolina.  CDPL is committed to diversity and racial equity and is an equal opportunity employer. 

For details about the positions and how to apply, please click here.

UNC School of Government

The UNC School of Government seeks a tenure-track assistant professor who will specialize in the field of criminal law. This position will be responsible for educating judicial officials on North Carolina criminal law. Click here for the announcement.

Disability Rights North Carolina (DRNC)

Disability Rights North Carolina (DRNC) is seeking a Staff Attorney for their Education Team with a Juvenile Justice and Race Equity Focus. The Staff Attorney will work to ensure equity in the education and criminal justice systems; represent students in special education, and school discrimination matters, including youth in juvenile detention facilities; train attorneys, advocates and other stakeholders; and participate in policy initiatives related to the school-to-prison pipeline.

Send a resume and detailed letter of interest explaining your qualifications and interest in the position to: virginia.fogg@disabilityrightsnc.org. Include Staff Attorney – Education in the subject line of the email. No phone calls please.

Wow! That was a LOT of information. If you have any questions please feel free to contact the office and we can help! See you next week!

OJD Week in Review: Apr. 9 – 13

This week we’ve got a new resource we wanted to bring attention to regarding sex offender registration and a few new events to add to the previous week’s rundown.

From Around the Community

Registration is now open for the 81st Annual National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Conference.  The event this year will take place at the Hyatt Regency Denver at the Colorado Convention Center from July 22 – 25.  The conference will offer presentations/training tracks on  topics such as family law, juvenile justice, child welfare, and family violence.  This conference is judicially-focused and open to all those interested in the improvement of juvenile and family justice.  For registration and further info, please visit the NCJFCJ website here.

Recertification pic

We would like to take a moment to recognize those who recently received renewed certification to specialize in juvenile delinquency during the Annual Luncheon of the N.C. State Bar Board of Legal Specialization.  Congratulations to (from left to right) Juvenile Chief of the Wake County Public Defender’s Office and Chair of the Juvenile Specialty Committee Mary Stansell, Regional Defender at N.C. Indigent Defense Services Valerie Pearce, and Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry.  Union County Attorney Anna Goodwin, who is also a member of the Juvenile Specialty Committee, was also in attendance.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Council of State Governments Justice Center will host the 2018 Janet Reno Forum on May 21 at  Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.  The forum will highlight strategies for restructuring juvenile justice systems to more effectively enhance public safety and improve outcomes for youth.  The event will include the presentation of the second annual Janet Reno Endowment Women’s Leadership Award, and attendees will receive a publication featuring the highlighted strategies.  Policymakers, practitioners, researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders are invited to attend.  Please register here.

New Resource

Since North Carolina does not automatically require juveniles to register if they’ve been adjudicated of a sex offense, many defenders don’t think to discuss sex offender registration with their clients.  However, your client may be required to register if your client moves to another state, attends college out of state, or goes to Virginia or South Carolina for treatment.  This resource – A Snapshot of Juvenile Sex Offender Registration and Notification” will help you to advise your clients of potential issues if they leave North Carolina.  Please note that the manual is from 2010, so be sure to double-check that no new laws have been passed since then, but it’s a great starting point.  Additionally, if you find that DJJ is recommending sending your client for treatment in a state that will require your client to be on its sex offender registry (notably Virginia and South Carolina), please contact our office.  We have a motion for you to file to ask the court to enter an injunction regarding placement in a facility that would require the juvenile to register (and it’s been successful – many judges don’t understand this either).

Training

Disability Rights North Carolina will be hosting its 2018 Disability Advocacy Conference next Thursday, Apr. 19.  The conference offers 5.0 CLE credits for lawyers, which includes 1.0 credit hour for substance abuse/mental health awareness.  Sessions include parental rights, restrictive interventions in public schools, guardianship reforms, and a session exclusively tailored to attorneys titled “Recognizing and Responding to a Lawyer with a Mental Health Disorder”, just to name a few.  To learn more about this event and register please visit their web page here.

Registration is now open for N.C. Bar Association’s annual meeting, this year titled “The Future of Law”.   This event will be hosted at the Wilmington Convention Center from June 21 – 24.  For those who register before May 1, a President’s Luncheon ticket and 6.0 CLE credit hours will be included with the registration price.  Topics covered will include artificial intelligence, virtual reality, design thinking in the law, and the future of legal service delivery.  For further info and to register please check out the NCBA website and the event brochure.

RTA

On May 10, the N.C. Bar Association will be hosting “Raise the Age: A New Era for Juvenile Justice in North Carolina” at the N.C. Bar Center in Cary, from 8:25 a.m. to 3 p.m.  This seminar promises to expand attendees’ understanding of the Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act and its practical and ethical implications.  Attendees will receive 5.5 CLE credits total, with 1.0 CLE credit in Ethics/Professional Responsibility and 4.5 General CLE credits.  For further details about this event, please check the website here.

We hope you saved the date!  It was recently announced that the 2018 Defender Trial School, cosponsored by the School of Government and the North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services, will be held Monday, July 9 through Friday, July 13, 2018, at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.  Defender Trial School participants will use their own cases to develop a cohesive theory of defense at trial and apply that theory through all stages of trial, including voir dire, opening and closing arguments, and direct and cross-examination.  The program will offer approximately 30 hours of general CLE credit and qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit.  The Defender Trial School is open to public defenders and a limited number of private attorneys who perform a significant amount of appointed work.  Further details will be provided on the course page in the near future.  Any questions or requests for additional info should be directed to Tanya Jisa at jisa@sog.unc.edu / 919.843.8981 or Professor John Rubin at rubin@sog.unc.edu/ 919.962.2498.

23777394-Save-the-date-grunge-rubber-stamp-on-white-vector-illustration-Stock-Vector

Job Opportunities

The National Center for Youth Law (NCYL) is seeking a mid-level policy attorney to handle youth justice issues in Santa Clara County.  Applications will be accepted until Sunday, Apr. 15, so get yours in soon!  For further details and to apply please check here.

The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) is still accepting applications for its 2018-19 Youth Justice Leadership Institute.  This is an annual year-long fellowship program that selects 10 people of color working as professionals in the juvenile justice field to participate in a curriculum to develop their leadership and advocacy skills.  The fellowship can be completed with the fellows’ current employment, so those selected will not have to leave their jobs to participate in the Institute.  The fellowship will include two fully financed retreats, mentoring and frequent distance learning opportunities.  Applications for the Institute (found here) must be submitted by Apr. 23.

The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) is currently hiring a strategic communications manager.  The individual in this position will be responsible for crafting organizational messaging, overseeing editorial excellence, and working with leadership to implement a communications strategy that is creative, forward-thinking, and reflective of NJDC’s vision.  This position will remain opened until filled.  To find further info about the position and how to apply, please go here.

The UNC School of Government is seeking a tenure-track full-time permanent assistant professor of juvenile justice and criminal law.  The selected candidate for this position will be expected “to write for, advise, plan courses for, and teach” public officials, including judges, magistrates, law enforcement, prosecutors and defenders.  Applications will remain open until the position is filled.  The expected starting date for the new hire will be July 1.  Please find the full details for the position and how to apply here.

This will do it for now.  We will be in contact with a few members of the N.C. juvenile defender community soon, providing a survey to gather feedback to improve our communications as we did last year.  If you do not receive an email from us with a link to the survey, please feel free to contact us any time with your thoughts for our blog, podcast, Facebook, Twitter, or the listserv.    We are always seeking ways to provide better support to defenders.  Thank you for reading and we will be sure to share more next week!