Week in Review: June 22-26

Another week down Readers! How are you feeling? Ready to get off, grab some ice cold lemonade and enjoy some front porch action? Us too, so let’s get down to business.

TIP OF THE WEEK!

District court is generally not a court of record, however juvenile delinquency court is a court of record.  That means that you are creating a record for use on appeal if that becomes necessary at the conclusion of your case.  In addition to making sure you preserve the record for appeal (more on that later), you may want to consider requesting an audio recording of a proceeding for other reasons.  For example, if you have a probable cause hearing, you may want to request the audio recording (and possibly have it transcribed) for use in the subsequent adjudicatory hearing.  The AOC form to request the audio recording of your hearing is AOC-G-115.

Webinars & Resources!

The North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Criminal Justice System is hosting a webinar, Policing & Racial Justice: Where Do We Go From Here?, June 29 at 12:00 PM.

Topics include: police brutality, qualified immunity, the “defund the police” debate, and racial justice in the wake of the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and others. Presenters include: Frank Baumgartner, Kami Chavis, Cerelyn “C.J.” Davis and Greear Webb. See more information and register here.

As we close out our LGBTQ+ Pride Week, we wanted to share some important resources:

LGBTQ Cultural Competency Links –

Please read more about Pride Week and the historic Stonewall Riots written by Anthony Benedetti, Chief Counsel, Committee for Public Counsel Services in Boston, MA.

Job Seeking Anyone?

  • NCPLS is searching for a new Executive Director. Applications will be accepted until June 30th. NCPLS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit law firm that provides people incarcerated by the North Carolina Division of Adult Correction with constitutionally required meaningful access to the courts. The Executive Director has primary responsibility for managing the organization’s day-to-day operations, directing the work of the staff, and serving as the primary spokesperson for the organization. Click here for description and application!
  • Strategies for Youth (SFY), a national nonprofit organization committed to improving police/youth interactions and reducing disproportionate minority contact, is seeking a new staff attorney. They are considering remote candidates. Please read more about this amazing opportunity here.

Alright Readers! That’s all for this week. We hope you have a great weekend and we will see you on our Twitter (@NCOJD) and Facebook (North Carolina Office of the Juvenile Defender) on Monday!!

Week in Review: June 15-19

Here’s to another Friday in the books! Couple announcements and a bit of history today, and of course your weekly tip. Thanks for all that you continue to do.

Tip of the Week – Building Trust

Investing time is the single most important strategy for building trust and rapport with your client.  You need to listen and ask questions without judgment, and explain why you need to ask certain questions.  Allow your client the opportunity, and encourage him/her to ask questions as well.  Be sure to explain to your client how your role is different from other adults s/he has interacted with (i.e. attorney/client privilege).  And most importantly – never make a promise you can’t keep.  If you say you’re going to do something – do it!

Ahem! Announcements!

Juneteenth.

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States, also known as Freedom Day. June 19th  is recognized as the African American Emancipation Day after news delivered by Union soldiers in 1865, led by Major General Gordon Granger, announced in Galveston, Texas with news that the last of the enslaved were now free. This occurred TWO YEARS after President Lincoln’s Proclamation.

Today marks 155 years since the Emancipation Proclamation was revealed in Texas and many companies and brands have made this day a paid holiday, acknowledging the struggle and victories of the African-American culture. Other organizations will work to make today a day of learning, promoting knowledge and appreciation of African-American history and self-development. Happy Juneteenth.

NEXT WEEK

OJD will be celebrating and providing educational insight to the LGBTQ+ community as it is the last week of Pride Month. We will be sharing insightful tips on how to address, speak, and represent your LGBTQ+ clients in delinquency courts, as well as a little bit of history. Stay tuned!

And Finally…

CHEERS TO THE WEEKEND!

OJD Week In Review: Nov. 6-10

This week we’ve got a few new resources and updates for you, just in case you haven’t already got them in your own inbox.

In the Week Behind Us

Last week the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice released a report titled “Developmental Reform in Juvenile Justice: Translating the Science of Adolescent Development to Sustainable Best Practice“.  This report is designed to assist local- and state-level organizations with incorporating “adolescent development research into their efforts to maximize improved and sustainable youth outcomes and system performance.”

Wake U

Also last week, NCCRED in collaboration with the Wake Forest University School of Law and Justice Program, the Wake Forest Journal of Law and Policy and the Wake Forest University Rethinking Community series held its Community Policing Symposium on Nov. 3.  The event featured a virtual lecture, a video presentation, and several discussions on how to improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve.  The summary for the event can be read here.

 

Lots of NJJN News

First in National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) news, we wanted to notify everyone that NJJN has  released a call to action to combat racism.  In their statement, NJJN acknowledges efforts in America’s history for civil rights and addresses the shortcomings of the juvenile justice system, particularly for youth of color, but also pointing out the marginalization of LGBTQI youth, children with disabilities and others.  NJJN also asks juvenile justice advocates to evaluate how we have approached racial injustice, to identify leadership, and  ask how we are held accountable.  Please take a moment to read the full article, which can be found here.

Secondly, NJJN has launched a campaign offering recommendations to improve relationships between police and youth of color.  They have a page on their website with a downloadable PDF with data and suggestions for distribution, and a press release template to help groups and individual advocates spread the word and get others involved.

Finally, NJJN has also announced that the Youth Justice Project will be hosting the #NJJNForum2018 in Durham.  This forum will celebrate the passage of Raise the Age in North Carolina and address much-needed reforms, such as eliminating collateral consequences, remedying racial and gender disparities, better access to defense for youth, and stemming the tide of referrals from schools to courts.  Currently, the organizations are seeking volunteers to join the Forum Planning Committee.  Please email Alyson Clements for more details.

Police Platform

More Useful Info

Earlier this week, the North Carolina Bar Association published an article by Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry about the National Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit.  In his writing, Zogry gives a brief account of his experience during the 21st annual conference.  You can read his article here and check out the NJDC page for more info on the Summit.

The Pew Charitable Trusts has created a chart, offering a visual display of data released from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  The data shows the declining rates of adjudicated youth  from 2006-2015, by state.  You can see the chart here.

From the On the Civil Side blog, Professor LaToya Powell’s has a new entry, “The Juvenile Court Counselor’s Role As Gatekeeper.”  You can read Professor Powell’s latest post here.

…and a Final Reminder

We also want to offer one final reminder that the Center for Death Penalty Litigation will be closing applications for its new staff attorney position on Monday, November 13.  You can view the full details about this position and how to apply here.

That is all for now.  We hope everyone has a safe and relaxing Veteran’s Day and there is more to come soon, so be sure to check back with us!

Fashioning Children: Gender Restrictive Dress Codes as an Entry Point for the Trans* School to Prison Pipeline by Deanna J. Glickman

Dress codes are a point of controversy within many school districts,raising questions of classism, racism, and conformity. For trans* students, that conformity may come at the cost of their gender identity, a cost which can cause negative reverberations throughout their life, including lowered academic performance, higher dropout rates, and increased disciplinary action. This article in the American University Washington College of Law Journal of Social Policy, Gender & the Law discusses the relationship between gender norms and dress codes, how gender-restrictive dress codes lead to targeting of trans* students, and how this targeting pushes students into the school to prison pipeline.

Author Deanna Glickman is a 2015 Gideon’s Promise Law School Partnership Project Fellow practicing in the Robeson County Public Defender’s Office.

For more information about juvenile defense, the celebration of In re Gault, and protecting the rights of LGBTQ youth, please see below:

gault at 50 pride month

Three New Reports Impacting Special Juvenile Populations

Three new reports were released addressing special juvenile populations: