OJD Week in Review: Oct. 16-20

This week we’ve got a few new resources for you, a panel discussion, and a declaration from the governor’s office we had to include.

Quick Reminder

Firstly, we’d like to remind everyone of the approaching deadlines for a couple of job opportunities we’ve previously mentioned.  Applications for the NJDC Gault Fellowship are due Monday, Oct. 30.  Also, applications for North Carolina Judicial Fellowship‘s two associate counsel positions are due by 5 p.m. today, and applications for the six (6) two-year fellowships starting August 2018 will close on Nov. 3.  Hurry and spread the word or apply if you are interested!

The National Juvenile Justice Network has also posted an opening for a 2018 Fall internship.  The full details for this unpaid internship can be found here.

And moving on to this week’s news…

On last Friday, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper declared Oct. 15-21 “Juvenile Justice Week” (among other things).  In his proclamation (which can be read here), Governor Cooper acknowledges the milestones achieved by the Juvenile Justice Section of the Division of Adult Corrections and Juvenile Justice, including the decline of the juvenile crime rate and passing of Raise the Age.

AtlanticOn Tuesday, Juvenile Defender Eric Zogry joined Ricky Watson, Jr., co-director of the Youth Justice Project, and District Court Judge Louis Trosch, Jr., co-chair of Race Matters of Juvenile Justice and judge for the 26th judicial circuit, on a live panel with The Atlantic‘s Assistant Editor (now to promoted Managing Editor as of this post) Adrienne Green to discuss juvenile justice reform and racial disparities.  In the video, the panel touches on school-justice partnerships, acknowledging implicit biases, and expectations for Raise the Age.  You can view the video here.

From the On the Civil Side blog, Professor LaToya Powell offers some insights on capacity.  In the latest post, titled “Incapacity to Proceed and Juveniles“, Powell breaks down the requirements for a juvenile to be determined capable of proceeding.

The Sentencing Project has also released two new fact sheets, “Native Disparities in Youth Incarceration” and “Latino Disparities in Youth Incarceration“, which offer quick statistics on the disparities between juvenile placements of youth of these ethnic groups and their Caucasian peers.  These fact sheets can be paired with the “Black Disparities in Youth Incarceration” fact sheet released back in September.

NJJN image

You should also check out the National Juvenile Justice Network’s latest newsletter when you find the time.  NJJN has several new articles, including one discussing Texas’ plans for juvenile justice reform, ways to participate in Youth Justice Action Month, and recognizing implicit bias, just to name a few.  The toolkit for changing harmful media narratives about youth of color that we mentioned last week can also be found in their newsletter.

That is all for this week, folks.  We hope that it has been a great Juvenile Justice Week for everyone.  If there is anything you would like to share about your experience during Youth Justice Action Month, please let the N.C. Juvenile Defender community know on Facebook or here on our blog!

“Incapacity to Proceed and Juveniles” by Professor LaToya Powell

On Friday, Professor LaToya Powell added a new entry titled “Incapacity to Proceed and Juveniles” to the On the Civil Side blog.  In this post, Powell breaks down the conditions to determine if a juvenile defendant has the capacity to participate in court proceedings.  Please take a moment to read her full article here.

OJD Week in Review: Oct. 9-13

This week we would like to point out some new resources, upcoming deadlines, and available job opportunities.

Fellowships and Deadlines

Early this week, the North Carolina Judicial Fellowship, a new office within the N.C. Judicial Branch which provides legal support to district and superior court judges, opened applications for several positions.  Currently, the office is accepting  applications for two associate counsel positions and six fellowships for August 2018 to August 2020.  Applications for these positions will close next Friday, Oct. 20, and Nov. 3, respectively.  On Nov. 6, the office will begin accepting applications for two other fellowships serving from January 2018 to August 2019.  The deadline for applications to this fellowship will be Nov. 17.  For more information about any of the positions or to apply, please visit here.  Questions may be directed to Andrew Brown, Director of the N.C. Judicial Fellowship at 919-890-1671 or Andrew.Brown@nccourts.org.

The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law has also opened applications for a two-year clinical fellowship beginning on Jan. 8, 2018.  This will be an immigration law fellowship in the Bluhm Legal Clinic’s Children and Family Justice Center.  The fellow will participate in community outreach, represent youth and parents in immigration court proceedings, and assist in the supervision and teaching of clinical students.  The deadline for applications will be Nov. 15 and all application materials and questions can be submitted to Uzoamaka Emeka Nzelibe.  The full description and requirements for this position can be found here.

New Resources, Fresh Updates, and Media

The National Juvenile Justice Network released a new toolkit on Tuesday which offers suggestions for advocates of juvenile justice to change the narrative of how minority youth are portrayed in the media.  The toolkit discusses social media strategies, methods for establishing relationships with media outlets, and other resources to assist in the prevention of media that criminalizes youth of color.

Campaign for Youth Justice released its newest report this week titled Raising the Bar:  State Trends in Keeping Youth Out of Adult Courts (2015-2017),  which examines states that are creating solutions to prevent children from entering the adult criminal justice system.  The report suggests that since 2005, 36 states have implemented a significant number of laws to protect youth from being treated as adults, even referencing plans to raise the age in multiple states, including North Carolina.  The report highlights the strengths and weaknesses of reform efforts in specific states as well.

CFYJ State Trends

We would also like to bring attention to several videos on Suite 6 LLC’s Vimeo channel, produced in collaboration with Campaign for Youth Justice.  These videos showcase interviews with adults who were incarcerated as juveniles and the parents of children involved in the justice system.   The interviews offer a intriguing perspective of individuals affected by the juvenile justice system.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has recently updated its Statistical Briefing Book to include a Data Snapshot series.  The one-page data sheets reveal stats on subjects such as characteristics/trends in delinquency cases involving Hispanic youth, the continued decline of the juvenile placement population, and frequently asked questions about commitments based on race and ethnicity.  There are also updates to several older resources.  The list for all of the new info can be accessed here.

do-dont-sign-300x296The Council of State Governments also has a great resource that was released last month titled “Do’s and Don’ts For Reducing Recidivism Among Young Adults in the Justice System“.  The document is a concrete and concise list outlining the best strategies for policymakers and leaders in juvenile justice to improve the outcomes for youth involved in the justice system.

And that is all there is for this week!  Juvenile justice advocates are always welcome to lend their voices to our blog or podcast, and don’t be shy about leaving comments and questions for us on our social media pages as well.  We want to have conversations with you all!  We will continue to provide more updates to the news above and other events as they arise, so please be sure to check out our website, Facebook, and Twitter frequently.  And as always, thanks for all that you do!

New Office in N.C. Judicial Branch Offers Several Positions

The North Carolina Judicial Fellowship is a new office within the N.C. Judicial Branch that provides independent legal research and writing support to judges of the superior and district court benches with regard to the matters over which those judges preside.  This Fall, the Fellowship is hiring for multiple positions:

  • 2 Associate Counsel Positions (applications open October 9 – October 20).
  • 6 Fellowships serving August 2018-August 2020 (applications open October 9 – November 3).
  • 2 Fellowships serving January 2018-August 2019 (applications open November 6 – November 17). (Not yet posted).

More information about any of the positions above, including links to the online applications, can be found by visiting www.nccourts.org/Fellowship and clicking on the “Apply” tab.  Questions may be directed to Andrew Brown, Director of the N.C. Judicial Fellowship at 919-890-1671 or Andrew.Brown@nccourts.org.

OJD Week in Review: Oct. 2-6

This week we want to remind everyone of some upcoming events/deadlines, an update to a Court of Appeals decision and an old-but-new addition to our materials for defenders.

LeandroOn Oct. 13, from 9:30 to 1 p.m., the the UNC Center for Civil Rights and the UNC Education Law & Policy Society, Black Law Students Association, and National Lawyers Guild are sponsoring “Leandro at 20: Two Decades in Pursuit of a Sound Basic Education.”  This event commemorates the 20th anniversary of Leandro v. State.  Registration is free, but space is limited, so be sure to sign up now!

Also, a brief reminder to recent law school grads (Class of 2017 or 2018), that applications for the NJDC Gault Fellowship are due by Oct. 30.  You can find further details about this opportunity and how to apply in our previous post from last month.  njdc logo

The Wake Forest University School of Law has just announced that registration is now open for their upcoming symposium.  This event, titled “The New Law and Order: Working Toward Equitable Community-Centered Policing in North Carolina”, will be hosted by the WFU School of Law Criminal Justice Program, NCCRED, and the Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy on Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Four hours of CLE credit will be offered for attending.  You can register on their website here, and for further info on the symposium please check here.

00001[1]

We also need to thank Assistant Appellate Defender David Andrews for reminding us that the Court of Appeals vacated the adjudication in In re T.K. on Sept. 29.  Andrews writes: “The basis of the opinion was that the juvenile petition was defective because the court counselor did not sign the petition and check the box on the petition indicating that it had been approved for filing.

“After the Court of Appeals issued its opinion, the State filed a petition for discretionary review in the Supreme Court of North Carolina.  [Last Friday], the Supreme Court issued an order denying the petition, which means that the Court of Appeals opinion in In re T.K. stands and will remain undisturbed.  So . . . keep scrutinizing petitions to make sure that they are proper!”

We would also like to bring it to everyone’s attention that we have the materials from this year’s Juvenile Defender Conference now available on our website.  Apologies for not having it added sooner, and big thanks to Austine Long for notifying us.  If you need a refresher or if you just happened to miss the conference and would like to see what was covered, the electronic copy of the materials are now ready and waiting for you in the “School of Government” section under the “Materials for Defenders” tab.

Juvenile defenders and others are still encouraged to share if there is anything you wish to discuss on our blog or our new podcast!  We are expecting more updates for other events in the coming months and we will also have other activities to share from our office as well, so be sure to check back frequently!

Save the Date: Leandro at 20

Leandro

On Oct. 13, in recognition of the 20th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in Leandro v. State, the UNC Center for Civil Rights and the UNC Education Law & Policy Society, Black Law Students Association, and National Lawyers Guild are sponsoring “Leandro at 20: Two Decades in Pursuit of a Sound Basic Education.” This half-day conference will feature individual presenters, two panels, lunch, and an opportunity for engaged discussion among participants.  The conference features presenters who have played an integral role in education in North Carolina over the last two decades, including June Atkinson, Jack Boger, Ann McColl, Howard Lee, and Bob Orr.  In addition, Professors Erika Wilson (UNC) and Derek Black (USC) will discuss future challenges for education in NC.

Our hope is to engage law students, education advocates, school administrators, and community members in this exciting event.

Registration is free but space is limited!  Sign up here now!

OJD Week In Review: Sept. 25-29

avatars-000131869186-my9qya-t500x500

This week, OJD has produced its first-ever podcast and we are now on SoundCloud!  In the podcast, Eric Zogry and Kim Howes discuss the Saldierna case.  Please click here to listen to the eighteen-minute recording.  We want to offer a special thanks to the N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts’ media team for helping us to create this presentation.

We plan to create more podcasts in the future in addition to our regular blog, and we encourage everyone in the N.C. juvenile defender community to contact us if there is any topic you would care to discuss, by audio, video or print!