Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault Part Five, the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination

Juvenile defenders, the court system, the governor, and other advocates recently celebrated a historic moment in juvenile justice. Monday was the 50th Anniversary of the In re Gault decision, which guaranteed juveniles the right to due process in delinquency proceedings. In honor of the event, this multiple part series on due process has explored the … Continue reading Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault Part Five, the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination

Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part Four, the Right to Confrontation

This post is the fourth in the series centered on In re Gault.  The Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment provides that “[i]n all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right . . . to be confronted with the witnesses against him.” U.S. Const. amend. VI.  This protection applies to state court criminal actions … Continue reading Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part Four, the Right to Confrontation

Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part Three, the Right to Notice

This post is the third in the series focused on In re Gault, the U.S. Supreme Court case which required that juveniles who were alleged to be delinquent should be extended the same due process rights applicable to adults in criminal proceedings.  The right to receive “notice” of a criminal charge or other alleged misconduct is … Continue reading Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part Three, the Right to Notice

Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part Two, the Right to Counsel

This post is the second in a series focused on In re Gault, the U.S. Supreme Court case which mandated that the core due process rights applicable to adults in criminal proceedings must also be afforded to juveniles who are alleged to be delinquent. Perhaps the most significant of these rights is the right to … Continue reading Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part Two, the Right to Counsel

Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part One

On May 15, 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court granted due process rights to children in the landmark case of In re Gault, 387 U.S. 1 (1967). The case involved 15-year-old Gerald Gault, who was taken into police custody without notice to his parents, held for four days, and committed to a juvenile facility for a … Continue reading Due Process Rights and Children: Fifty Years of In re Gault – Part One

2017 Year in Review

Another year gone, some great milestones achieved, and the Office of the Juvenile Defender (OJD) would like to highlight a few of those accomplishments from 2017: Legislation This was a monumental year for juvenile justice legislation as we celebrated the 50th anniversary of In re Gault and the passage of Raise the Age in N.C. … Continue reading 2017 Year in Review

From a Non-Lawyer Perspective: 2017 Juvenile Defender Conference Review by Marcus Thompson

On Friday, Aug. 11, juvenile defenders from across N.C. united at the U.N.C. School of Government for the 2017 Juvenile Defender Conference — and I had the honor of being among the 50+ attendees!  Only approaching my first full year as a part of the Juvenile Defender family, I was pretty excited to be able … Continue reading From a Non-Lawyer Perspective: 2017 Juvenile Defender Conference Review by Marcus Thompson