OJD Week in Review: Feb. 12-16

This week there is of course more training to come and a few other events and resources to note.  And we would also like to bring a special notice to the attention of  juvenile defenders:

A Quick Note from IDS

Indigent Defense Services continues to try to address the low hourly rates that resulted from the budget crisis in 2011.  We will once again ask for expansion funding to increase the rates $10 across the board as partial restoration of the pre-May 2011 rates.  However, we face an uphill battle as that cost is over $10 Million.

Earlier this year, we did identify availability in our budget to address a small portion of cases and increased the rate paid for High-Level Felonies (Class A-D) to $75/hour.  Attorneys and judges in delinquency court sometimes forget that the hourly rate for these higher level felonies is different than the usual $55/rate.  For cases disposed of prior to November 1, 2017 where the highest original charge was a Class A-D Felony, the hourly rate should be $70; for cases disposed of November 1, 2017, the rate is $75/hour.

Around the Defender Community

All juvenile justice advocates are welcome to come out to support Scott Holmes who will be honored at the Elna B. Spaulding Founder’s Award Partner’s for Peace Celebration.  Scott is an assistant clinical professor of law and supervising attorney of the Civil Litigation Clinic at North Carolina Central University.  He has long been a champion for the rights of children, immigrants, and the mentally ill and he has represented jail, protesters, Black Lives Matter protesters, families of minorities killed by police, and many other activists and disadvantaged groups.  The event will take place on  Thursday, March 22, from 6:30 to 8:30 at Hill House on 900 S. Street, Durham, N.C.  Advanced tickets are $30 and tickets can be purchased at the door for $35.  More event details can be found here.

Earlier this week, Youth First released a video titled “Jim Crow Juvenile Justice”.  The film explores the history of youth prisons, including the correlation between the 13th Amendment and the creation of these institutions, and examines the modern juvenile justice system from a racial-justice standpoint.  Please take a moment to view the short film here.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention will be hosting a webinar from 2-3 p.m. on Feb. 20 to provide information for its FY18 Juvenile Justice Emergency Planning Demonstration Program.  The webinar will cover project scope, eligibility requirements and other information for those interested in applying to support this project.  Please check out OJJDP’s website for more details and you can register here for the webinar.

Training Time, Y’all!

Registration is open for Higher-Level Felony Defense, Part I.  This training will take place April 9-10 and will offer 9.0 CLE credit hours.  Topics will include working with investigators and experts, building rapport with clients, investigation and discovery, the theory of defense, and third-party records.  Space is limited for only 36 participants, so please hurry if you are interested in participating!  Members of public defender offices should get approval from the Chief Public Defender to register and contractors and privately assigned counsel must receive a fellowship from IDS Director Tom Maher.  For more information on registration, the agenda, and hotel information please visit here.

wvpviw

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform(CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

We also would like to remind everyone that registration for the 2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents seminar is open until Monday, Feb. 19.  The seminar itself will take place on March 1 from 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. and it will offer 6 hours of CLE credit, including one hour of ethics/responsibility.  For registration, directions, and other details, please visit here.

New Resource

The National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics released a report earlier this week providing details from its survey of state criminal history information systems.  The survey was conducted by administrators of the state criminal history record repositories and offers information on topics ranging from noncriminal justice background checks to state criminal history files and accessibility to records and services through state repositories.  The report can be viewed here.

That is all for this week.  We will be updating our channels with new podcasts and other information & if you are interested in participating in a podcast or submitting a guest blog, please contact us to let us know.  We will also be providing more news regarding Raise the Age and other initiatives over time, so please be sure to keep up with us on all of our channels.

Registration is Open for Higher-Level Felony Defense Training

We are pleased to announce a new course offering from the School of Government, Higher-Level Felony Defense, Part 1. As the name implies, the purpose of the course is to prepare attorneys to handle more serious felony cases at the trial level. The course will take place over two sessions, with the first part taking place April 9-10 at the School of Government. The first session will offer 9 hours of CLE credit including 1 hour of ethics credit. Part II will take place in late summer or early fall of this year. (Part I is not a prerequisite to Part II, although we hope that attending both will be helpful.)

The course description and agenda for part I of the course can be viewed here. The Office of Indigent Defense Services has agreed to fund registration for all participants, including contract attorneys and private assigned counsel (although they remain responsible for the cost of their own travel, lodging, and meals other than those provided during the training).

Due to the expected level of interest, the intensive nature of the training, and limits on seating capacity, the program will be capped at 36 total participants. You must take the following steps BEFORE you can register.

  • If you are in a public defender’s office, you must obtain the approval of your Chief Public Defender to register. Because of limited space, each office is allotted one slot.
  • If you are a contract attorney or private assigned counsel, you must apply to receive a fellowship to attend. It’s short, we promise. Interested applicants should submit a paragraph to IDS Director Tom Maher, K.Maher@nccourts.org, describing how the training would help them in handling higher level felony cases, the number of jury trials they’ve tried, the most serious level of felony that they have experience handling, the percentage of their work that involves indigent criminal defense, and the county or counties in which they handle indigent defense cases. The deadline for applying for a fellowship is Monday, March 5 at 5:00pm. However, don’t wait until then! Decisions will be made on a rolling basis, and the available spaces may fill quickly.

Once you are approved by your Chief Public Defender or offered a fellowship, visit the course page at https://www.sog.unc.edu/courses/higher-level-felony-defense-part-i#!#register to register.

Please contact Toogie Hampton, Program Manager, at thampton@sog.unc.edu or 919.843.6518 or Phil Dixon, Defender Educator at dixon@sog.unc.edu or 919.966.4248.

OJD Week in Review: Feb. 5-9

This week there are some great opportunities for work, training and community building in juvenile defense.

Job Post Reminder and a Nice Little Feature

We want to remind everyone that the North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) will be closing applications for its executive director position on Feb. 15.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

NCCRED

If you haven’t already heard, the UNC School of Government recently added a post promoting the General Counsel Office of the Administrative Office of the Courts.  This post is a Q&A with LaToya Powell, former law professor of UNC and the new assistant legal counsel for the Office of General Counsel, working primarily in juvenile justice.  In the article, written by Austine Long, Powell discusses challenges in her new role, making an impact on Raise the Age, and her personal interest in juvenile justice.  You can read Austine’s post here.

Training for a Better You

On June 12-14, 2018, Global Youth Justice will host its 19th Global Youth Justice Training Institute in Cape Cod, MA.  Through more than 25 presenters, sessions, and workshops, participants will learn strategies to establish or enhance local volunteer-driven juvenile justice and youth justice diversion programs called Teen/Youth/Student/Peer Court or Peer Jury.  Topics will include youth and adult volunteer training; quality community service placements, programmatic enhancements, and operational strategies, administrative tips, grant writing, identifying funding opportunities, and more.  This will be the first year that both adults and youth will be able to attend.  To register and learn more about this exciting event, please check the website here.

training toy storyThe UNC School of Government is excited to announce that the “2018 Child Support Enforcement: Representing Respondents” seminar has been rescheduled to Thursday, March 1 and registration is now open.  This full-day seminar provides training for attorneys who represent alleged contemnors in child support enforcement proceedings.  The seminar will begin with sessions on the requirements for civil and criminal contempt and the dispositional alternatives available to the trial court.  It continues with presentations on understanding the state and federal regulations, community resources for your clients, and advocacy in child support contempt cases.  The seminar also includes a one hour ethics session.  This training is open to public defenders and private attorneys who do appointed work and is geared toward attorneys who represent respondents in child support enforcement proceedings.  Pre-registration is required, there will be no onsite registration, and space is limited.  The registration deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 19.  To register online, as well as to find directions and other program information (including our cancellation and refund policy), please visit here.  If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact Tanya Jisa, Program Manager, jisa@sog.unc.edu or 919-843-8981, or Austine Long, Program Attorney, at along@sog.unc.edu or 919.962.9594.

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform(CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program until March 2.  This program will take place June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  The training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  For further details on this program and how to apply, please check out the link here.

That will be all for this week.  We will have more to come soon and we encourage you all to check back soon for updates and fresh announcements.

OJD Week In Review: Jan. 29-Feb. 2

This week we’ve been promoting some great new resources and opportunities, and continuing our momentum from the past few days, we just want to rehash a few things and introduce some other good nuggets for you all:

NCCRED Wants YOU

NCCREDThe North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) has opened applications for a new executive director.  The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.  Applications will be accepted until Feb. 15.  Please find the details about the position and how to apply here.

New Resources

The North Carolina Office of Indigent Defense Services (IDS) is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients.  As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  In order to assist counsel in meeting the requirement of Padilla, IDS has contracted with two experienced immigration attorneys who will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.  An Immigration Consequences page has been added to IDS’ website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) has recently launched a Teen Dating Violence feature on its website.  This page offers links to the National Dating Abuse Helpline along with various publications and other resources to help victims and others involved with people who need aid or just want to be educated on the issue.   Their pages also provide further links to information on domestic violence, sexual assault, and “special populations”, including juveniles.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also released an updated review on “Interactions Between Youth and Law Enforcement“.  This document compiles research from various organizations, analyzing youth-initiated and police-initiated interactions, the impacts of such interactions on the juvenile justice system, police training programs, diversion programs and more.  The full review can be found here.

Training Opportunities

Registration is still open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training until Feb. 15.  We want to make sure that everyone, especially those in the juvenile defense community, have a chance to take advantage of this valuable training.  Please be sure to check it out here and we will continue to offer light reminders in the coming weeks.

i-love-training-trainings-my-favoriteThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) is accepting applications for its Youth in Custody Certificate Program, to be held June 11–15, 2018, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.  This training is designed for juvenile justice system leaders and partners working to improve outcomes for youth in post-adjudication custody.  The curriculum covers critical areas, including culture change and leadership, addressing racial and ethnic disparities, family engagement, assessment, case planning, facility-based education and treatment services, and reentry planning and support.  Upon approval of a Capstone Project Proposal initiating or building on local reform efforts, participants receive an Executive Certificate from Georgetown University and join the CJJR Fellows Network of more than 850 individuals.  Applications will be accepted until March 2.

 

That will be all for this week.   There is plenty more to come in the next few weeks, so check back here early and often.  Also, if there is anything anyone in the N.C. juvenile defense community would like to submit to us to promote on our website and other channels, be sure to contact us and let us know.  We are always here to support you!