NCCRED Seeks a New Executive Director

The North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NCCRED) is now accepting applications for an executive director.

The organization seeks an executive director  who can provide organizational leadership, racial equity coalition building, and can manage its commission committees and initiatives.  Top candidates will have a passion for racial justice and criminal justice reform, excellent communication skills, the ability to manage a wide variety of organizational priorities, comfort with conflict and engaging in robust dialogue with people of differing views and experience in criminal justice reform.

To learn more about the job description and how to apply, please see the Indeed post here.

NCCRED

NCCRED is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that works across professional, political and ideological lines to identify, document and reduce racial disparities in North Carolina’s criminal justice system.  NCCRED brings together a diverse group of criminal justice leaders who share a commitment to building a more equitable, effective and humane criminal justice system in North Carolina.  Represented on the Commission are members of the Judiciary (Court of Appeals, Superior Court and District Court Judges), law enforcement professionals (Chiefs of Police and Department of Corrections), District Attorneys, Public Defenders, community advocates and scholars.  The Commission provides a forum for open dialogue, collective problem solving, information sharing and educating Commissioners on the most important developments in racially equitable criminal justice reform in North Carolina and across the nation.  NCCRED’s focus areas are pretrial justice, juvenile justice and policing.

 

IDS Now Offers Immigration Consultations For Attorneys

IDS is excited to announce a new resource for counsel representing appointed clients. As you know, the Supreme Court held in Padilla v. Kentucky, 559 U.S. 356 (2010), that the effective assistance of counsel may require counsel to provide advice about the potential immigration consequences of the possible resolutions of the case.  Even highly competent criminal defense counsel may not be able to meet the requirements of Padilla without assistance from trained immigration counsel.  In order to assist counsel in meeting this requirement, IDS has contracted with two, experienced immigration attorneys; Helen Parsonage and Robert Lamb.  Ms. Parsonage and Mr. Lamb will provide immigration consultations for counsel representing appointed clients.

We have added an Immigration Consequences page to our website, where you will find an explanation of the process, a link to an on-line form that you can use to request immigration advice, and a printable version of the form that you can use when interviewing your client or otherwise gathering the required information. http://www.ncids.org/ImmigrationConsult/Links.htm?c=Immigration%20Consultations.   There may be an issue if you are using Chrome as your browser, which should be fixed, otherwise you can start using this resource now.

As explained on the Immigration Consequences page, do not delay in seeking immigration advice when your client may face immigration consequences.

If you are an APD, Susan Brooks previously sent an email regarding how you should use this service.

Final Reminder to Register for 2018 Felony Defender Training

Registration for the 2018 Felony Defender Training scheduled for February 14-16, is available at https://www.sog.unc.edu/courses/felony-defender-training. This training is co-sponsored by the UNC School of Government and the Office of Indigent Defense Services.  The agenda is posted on the course webpage.

Program: This program is for attorneys who are new to handling felony cases. Topics will include discovery and investigation, suppression and other superior court motions, lab reports, preserving the record, jury instructions, sentencing, and trial skills— including conducting voir dire —necessary to handle felony cases from start to finish. The program is comprised of plenary sessions and intensive small group workshops.

Participants: The Felony Defender Training is open to public defenders and private attorneys who perform a significant amount of appointed work. The program is geared toward attorneys who are new to representing defendants charged with felonies in superior court. Attendance is limited to 48 participants in light of the intensive small group work.

LOCATION, DATES, & TIMES: This training will be held at the School of Government on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus February 14-16, 2018.  Check-in is from 9:15 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. on Wednesday.  The training ends at 12:45 p.m. on Friday. Lunch will be provided Wednesday and Thursday as well as light snacks and refreshments during most breaks.

REGISTRATION: We are currently at capacity for Private Assigned Counsel, Contract Attorneys, and other non-IDS employees, however there is a waiting list should additional space become available.  You will only be notified of space becoming available if you are on the waiting list.  To be placed on the waiting list, please send your name and phone number to Tanya Jisa at jisa@sog.unc.edu.

IDS employees may still register online, as well as to find directions, hotel information, and other program details—including our cancellation and refund policy—by visiting https://www.sog.unc.edu/courses/felony-defender-training. Space is limited and preregistration is required; the registration deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, January 30. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Please plan on attending all sessions.

Note that our registration system requires one unique email address per profile created, so each person who plans to attend must register separately using an individual email address. As we correspond with participants primarily through email, please ensure that your email address is current if you are a returning customer.

FEE: The registration fee for private assigned counsel is $415, which includes all materials, parking, breaks, and lunches. Thanks to support from IDS, there is no fee for IDS state employees.

Credit & Certification: The program offers 15.5 hours of continuing legal education (CLE) credit, including 1 hour of ethics/professional responsibility, 1 hour of mental health/substance abuse, and qualifies for NC State Bar criminal law specialization credit.

Hotel Information: A block of rooms had been reserved at the Holiday Inn Express Chapel Hill, however the deadline for the reduced rate has passed. To reserve a room online at the standard rate, please visit www.hiexpress.com/chapelhillnc or call the hotel directly at 919.489.7555.

TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT—IDS STATE EMPLOYEES ONLY: Travel reimbursement for IDS state employees is contingent upon state rules and regulations. For all questions regarding travel reimbursement, please contact Elisa Wolper, Fiscal Officer at IDS, at 919.354.7200. Please note that travel reimbursement forms must be submitted to IDS Financial Services within 30 days of travel or reimbursement will be denied.

Additional Information: We look forward to seeing you in February.  If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact Tanya Jisa at jisa@sog.unc.edu / 919.843.8981 or Phil Dixon—Defender Educator—at dixon@sog.unc.edu / 919.966.4248.

OJD Week in Review: Jan. 22-26

We’re bringing more reminders than big updates this week, but as always we’ve got a few good tidbits of news you can use.

Your Usual Training News

Earlier this week we posted that registration is now open for the “Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” training.  Cosponsored by the Office of Indigent Defense Services and the School of Government, this training will be held on March 9 at the UNC School of Government, starting at 8:45 a.m. and ending at 4:15 p.m.  The training will be geared towards attorneys who represent youth in juvenile and superior court and will cover topics including sentencing, mitigation, parole hearings, transfer hearings and the future of Miller cases.  In our previous post we provide details for hotel information, travel reimbursement and registration.

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We’d also like to remind everyone that registration for “Regional Training for Indigent Defense: Defending Sexual Offenses” closes Monday, Jan. 29, at 5 p.m.  This CLE, hosted by the UNC School of Government, will focus on defending sexual offenses with sessions on physical evidence, cross-examining experts, and motions and legal issues.  The event will be held on Feb. 8, 2018 at 1801 Nash St., Sanford, N.C. in the Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center.  This program is open to all IDS contract attorneys and privately assigned counsel representing indigent clients and will offer 3.0 hours of CLE credit.  There is an $85 registration fee that will cover CLE credits, snacks, and materials.  Please find further details and register here.

New Resources

If you’re in need of CLE credits before the annual deadline, the Indigent Defense Education Group at the School of Government is ready and waiting to help.  With on-demand courses taught by experienced staff and legal professionals, you have the option to take a course for free if you just want to learn something new for the day or pay a fee to obtain your required CLE time.  This should be a valuable resource for all defenders, offering courses in many areas including ethics, mental health/substance abuse, and more.  You can access the on-demand content library here.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has also added a new snapshot to its Statistical Briefing Book, focusing on girls in the juvenile justice system.  This new file offers statistics on the types of offenses committed by girls and comparisons of arrests for certain crimes between males and females, with data gathered up to 2015.  You can find the newest entry in the Statistical Briefing Book here and also check out other recent updates to the database here.

facebookThat completes the news for this week.  We still encourage all stakeholders in the juvenile defense community to feel free to contact us about submitting guest blogs or joining us on our podcast.  And for those of you who are new to juvenile defense, or if you know someone who is interested in juvenile defense, be sure to contact us to be added to our listserv, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter as well.

Registration is Now Open for “The Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder” Training

We are excited to announce that the School of Government and the Office of Indigent Defense Services will be cosponsoring a new course titled “The Advocating for Youth Charged with First Degree Murder”. This training will be held on March 9, 2018 at the UNC School of Government.

This special topics training is for attorneys who represent youth in juvenile or superior court. It will include topics that address sentencing, mitigation, parole hearings, transfer hearings and a discussion about the future of Miller cases. The training will offer 5.75 CLE Hours.  Here you will find a copy of the agenda.

Check-in will be on Friday, March 9, 2018 from 8:00 a.m. to 8:45 a.m., at which time the program will begin. The program ends at 4:15 p.m.

REGISTRATION: To register online, as well as to find directions and other program information, please visit the UNC School of Government website.

The registration fee for the training is $165.  The online registration deadline is 5:00 p.m. on FRIDAY, March 2, 2018. There is no onsite registration.

HOTEL INFORMATION: A block of rooms has been set up at the Holiday Inn Express Chapel Hill. The rate is $80 per night and includes a full deluxe hot breakfast, high speed wireless internet access and local shuttle service. To reserve a room online please visit www.hiexpress.com/chapelhillnc and use the group code JPM. To reserve a room by phone please call the hotel directly at 919.489.7555, provide your arrival / departure dates and the group code JPM. You are responsible for making your own hotel reservation. The reservation deadline for the block rate is February 15, 2018. After this date, guests will be accommodated on a space-available basis and may not be able to obtain the group rate.

TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT – IDS STATE EMPLOYEES ONLY: If you are an IDS employee, your eligibility for travel reimbursement at the state rate is contingent upon state rules and regulations. For all questions regarding travel reimbursement, please contact Elisa Wolper—Chief Financial Officer at IDS—at 919.890.1643. Please note travel reimbursement forms must be submitted to IDS Financial Services within 30 days of travel or reimbursement will be denied.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: We look forward to seeing you in March.  If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact me, Susan Jensen – Program Manager – at sjensen@sog.unc.edu or 919-962-0940, or Austine Long – Program Attorney for the Indigent Defense Education – at along@sog.unc.edu or 919.962.9594.

OJD Week in Review: Jan. 15-19

Good afternoon N.C. Juvenile Defender Community.  It has been a rather eventful week, depending on where you are, and we hope everyone is still warm and safe.  This week we would like recap a few important things.

ICYMI

Earlier in the week, Assistant Appellate Defender David Andrews offered a great breakdown of the updated North Carolina Juvenile Defender manual, the first new edition since 2008.  The new manual offers defenders instruction based on changes to the Juvenile Code over the past decade, including sections on procedures for suppression motions and Raise the Age legislation, along with expanded sections on other topics covered in the original.  Andrews co-wrote the new manual along with John Rubin, Albert Coates Professor of Public Law and Government at the UNC School of Government.  Please take a moment to read David’s article here and access the new manual on the School of Government’s website.

RTA

Also, earlier in the week our office released our “2017 Year in Review”, highlighting some of the juvenile defense community’s biggest achievements in the past year, including the passage of Raise the Age and commemorating the 50th anniversary of In re Gault.  In our post we also provide our plan going forward to evaluate contracts and provide training in response to the increase in juvenile jurisdiction.  To read our brief on some of our successes and plans from 2017, please check out our article here.

Quick Reminders

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) will be supporting National Drug and Alcohol Facts week, sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  From Jan. 22-28, these organizations will be supporting community events nationwide and beyond that bring people together, from adolescents to experts, to discuss alcohol and drug abuse.  The National Institute on Drug Abuse will be providing free booklets about how to deal with drug abuse, in addition to other educational resources.

OJJDP will also be accepting nominations for their 2018 National Missing Children’s Day awards until Jan. 24.  They are seeking nominees for their Missing Children’s Citizen Award and Missing Children’s Child Protection Award.  These awards are meant to recognize private individuals who helped to recover a missing/abducted child and professionals, such as law enforcement officers and child protective service agents, who have worked to protect children from abuse and victimization.  For further details and to submit your nominations, please check here.

That will be all for now, but warmer weather, better days, and more news are ahead!  Don’t forget to check back early and often and follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well.